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Which way does a hacksaw blade go on?


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#1 robzy

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 11:41 AM

This blade isn't symmetrical, the triangle thingos have a straight (perpendicular) edge, and a slated edge...

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Which way do I orientate it when I put it on the bracket thingo?

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#2 Jeruselem

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 11:46 AM

OK, I'm not expert ... this is from wikipedia A screw or other mechanism is used to put the thin blade under tension. The blade can mounted with the teeth facing toward or away from the from the handle, resulting in cutting action on either the push or pull stroke. On the push stroke, the arch will flex slightly, decreasing the tension on the blade.
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#3 Oracle X

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 11:46 AM

The slanted edge should face towards you, I think. But I prefer to cut up my victims with a knife, so I could be wrong.
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#4 SquallStrife

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 11:48 AM

The cutting points should point away from you, so that you cut on the push stroke.

#5 smadge1

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 11:49 AM

depends how you use it, are you stronger with the push or pull stroke? I would orient it so it was cutting on the push stroke.

Edited by smadge1, 03 December 2009 - 11:49 AM.

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#6 moofactory

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 11:50 AM

from memory you want the perpendicular angle to be facing you and the slanted angle to be facing away from you. (so it slides foward easyer? which as said is also the cutting angle)

Id expect its easyer to pull on the strait angle of the teeth than it would be to push on it.

Just think in your head about the last time you were sawing...

just to show an example:

ice carving saws

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Edited by moofactory, 03 December 2009 - 11:54 AM.


#7 Oracle X

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 11:50 AM

depends how you use it, are you stronger with the push or pull stroke?

I would orient it so it was cutting on the push stroke.



oh I think robzy is very skilled at the pull... stroke... :-P
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#8 VannA

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 11:51 AM

... wow. :D Cut on the push.

#9 wlayton27

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 11:53 AM

Yep, straight edges facing away from the handle so it cuts on the push stroke. Wiki may be right that it goes either way, but it's safer and more effecient to cut on the push strokes. Plus an electric saws-all blade only plugs in one way and the flat edges face outwards.
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#10 SquallStrife

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 11:55 AM

Id expect its easyer to pull on the strait angle of the teeth than it would be to push on it.


It's not about being easy to move, it's about cutting away more material per stroke.

If the cutting points are pointed away from you, it will be cutting while you're pushing, with plenty more weight behind it than when you pull.

#11 robzy

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 11:57 AM

I assume the straight edge is the cutting edge, it seems to agree with the random facts floating around my mind. Straight edge cutting on the push stroke? Done :) Thanks guys. Rob.

#12 Jeruselem

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 11:59 AM

I don't use them very often I find it easier to cut on the push or maybe it's way the ones at home are done - for the push cut.
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#13 Rybags

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 12:00 PM

It's actually easier to cut on the pull stroke. That's how mine's setup. If you have one of those you-beaut Japanese tree saws, that's the way they're setup too. Prove it to yourself - try each direction and operate the saw one-handed. Electric is different... generally the design is to deflect shavings/chips away from the operator, and to design the tool such that it won't jump upwards if it sticks. but... it could be argued with a hacksaw two-handed, you can apply more power as the second hand can better apply forward + downward force.

Edited by Rybags, 03 December 2009 - 12:01 PM.

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#14 SquallStrife

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 12:05 PM

It's actually easier to cut on the pull stroke. That's how mine's setup.
If you have one of those you-beaut Japanese tree saws, that's the way they're setup too.


It's easier, but (in the case of a hacksaw) takes way longer to cut, since there isn't nearly as much force on the teeth.

#15 Rybags

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 12:14 PM

The other argument for pull-stroke action: the blade is less likely to buckle due to the entire saw being contracted, and is also less likely to jump off the piece of work and stratch the shit out of it.
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#16 tastywheat

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 12:23 PM

The other argument for pull-stroke action: the blade is less likely to buckle due to the entire saw being contracted, and is also less likely to jump off the piece of work and stratch the shit out of it.


This.

Pull-to-cut is the standard, or at least the standard tradies use.
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#17 Foods

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 12:30 PM

Just be sure to have the teeth facing up. '
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#18 SquallStrife

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 12:34 PM

The other argument for pull-stroke action: the blade is less likely to buckle due to the entire saw being contracted, and is also less likely to jump off the piece of work and stratch the shit out of it.


This.

Pull-to-cut is the standard, or at least the standard tradies use.


I guess it's a personal preference thing then? I've never ever ever seen hacksaws used pull-to-cut.

You put more force on the saw when you push, gently dragging the teeth back across the material to cut seems futile.

Edited by SquallStrife, 03 December 2009 - 12:34 PM.


#19 Jeruselem

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 12:36 PM

I think Robzy has to work out which is best for him I guess!
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#20 MoshVandal

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 12:42 PM

The other argument for pull-stroke action: the blade is less likely to buckle due to the entire saw being contracted, and is also less likely to jump off the piece of work and stratch the shit out of it.


This.

Pull-to-cut is the standard, or at least the standard tradies use.

Really? Pretty much every saw I've ever come across cuts on the push stroke, save for a pruning saw that I have, which cuts on the pull (from memory, been a while since I used it), and the pruning saw at my folks house, which has bi-directional teeth ('M' shaped).

That said, I remember an ad on TV years ago for something like this SHARKSAW, which is a pull saw. But aside from that, every rip/tenon saw I've ever seen has been on the push.

I've messaged my brother, the ex stair builder, turned all round builder. So a proper tradie answer should be forthcoming. :)
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