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View old Local Area Connection properties


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#1 tantryl

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 02:33 PM

I've got a system here that I've had to switch from one PC to the next (dead mainboard) and due to custom software (POS system) I can't simply do a re-install. I've got the OS and whatnot working on the new hardware but I need to know what static IP address the previous network adapter was using (the device it's plugged into is passworded and set up in a certain way and the owners don't know the password - factory resetting it would screw up the POS system). So on the new PC the network adapters (2 of them) are Local Area Connection 4 and Local Area Connection 5. I need to look up the previous static IPs of Local Area Connection 3, 2 and 1 to figure out what the adapter is meant to be set to. Any ideas on how?
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#2 Xen

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 03:50 PM

I've got a system here that I've had to switch from one PC to the next (dead mainboard) and due to custom software (POS system) I can't simply do a re-install.

I've got the OS and whatnot working on the new hardware but I need to know what static IP address the previous network adapter was using (the device it's plugged into is passworded and set up in a certain way and the owners don't know the password - factory resetting it would screw up the POS system).

So on the new PC the network adapters (2 of them) are Local Area Connection 4 and Local Area Connection 5. I need to look up the previous static IPs of Local Area Connection 3, 2 and 1 to figure out what the adapter is meant to be set to. Any ideas on how?


Only thing i could think of would be to dig around through the event logs and or any other log files hoping to come across one or both of the IP addresses.

the other shitty option would be to see if you can grab the router IP address by sniffing out some ARP packets then randomly testing ip addresses from the subnet... i however would prefer a rusty fork to the eye.

#3 tantryl

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 04:15 PM

I know the router IP, I just don't know what the computer's static IP needs to be. It's possible I can find it through one of the terminals, but that sounds like the more difficult task. *EDIT* Only IP addresses I could find in the event viewer were for the terminals (it's creating DCOM events when it can't find them).

Edited by tantryl, 21 February 2012 - 04:24 PM.

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#4 sponger

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 12:56 AM

I think Windows stores that stuff in the registry. Maybe search it for the network portion of the address, eg if the network's 192.168.0.0/24 search for "192.168.0". Or search for what you believe the interfaces were named, eg "Local Area Connection", but from my quick look (on Windows 7) the results don't seem to accompany IP details (but potentially other stuff to identify/find the correct IP details). Of course, Windows may have deleted old config.

#5 Xen

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 07:54 AM

Of course, Windows may have deleted old config.


That was my first thought when i saw the OP's question.

I don't think that the original IP address would be kept anywhere other than logs when the IP address has been changed.

#6 lew~

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 08:49 AM

Of course, Windows may have deleted old config.


That was my first thought when i saw the OP's question.

I don't think that the original IP address would be kept anywhere other than logs when the IP address has been changed.

Registry was my first thought.



Does it have to be the exact IP? e.g. could you configure addresses in each of the private subnet ranges and do a ping scan to test connectivity? 10.0.0.10/8, 192.0.0.10/8, 172.0.0.10/8

#7 SledgY

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 12:36 PM

The IP address might still be listed in the routers ARP table. You will need to do a little elimination and guess work if you don't know the actual MAC address.

Edited by SledgY, 22 February 2012 - 12:43 PM.

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#8 AccessDenied

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Posted 10 March 2012 - 01:45 PM

If you have other POS's, can you do 'the obvious' and check their IPs and see whether there is a standard? If you have 192.168.0.41 and 192.168.0.43, you could guess at .42 AD F#$KIT. Just saw the date. My point still stands.
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#9 chrisbrownie

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Posted 14 March 2012 - 09:34 PM

HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentcontrolSet\network\ enjoy.




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