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#1 Master_Scythe

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Posted 08 May 2015 - 10:57 AM

So just an idea,

It may fall off and drift to page 9999 in no time, but maybe people care.

 

Who has car questions?

Never changed your oil?

Unsure which fluids are best\should be used?

Been told a 'Job is hard' and think you're being ripped off?

Want advice\help on a DIY?

 

Discuss it here!

I'm a bit of an oil and fluids nerd myself, so feel free to ask... things.

 

 

 

 

I'm actually going to start this one off myself with a story, and to see if anyone can think of any bases I haven't covered...

 

To cut a long story short (it's still long...); working on a  Stock Turbo'd EJ20;

Both banks on the passenger side are super lean.

Both banks on the Drivers side are fouled (but have colder plugs in them; 7's, and IMO subaru already specs one range colder than needed... so i'm not too worried here)

 

The drivers side proves the rail (at least on that side.....) is getting sufficient fuel pressure, as there is only one shared feed (otherwise we'd have a full lean condition, not just 2 cylinders)

 

First thing we tried was temporarily clamping the fuel return hose, which helped a fair bit. (I only wish I had a fuel pressure gauge, because those spiked levels are scary, lol)

We changed the fuel pressure reg (which could be blown through albeit slowly, by mouth pressure alone). And that helped a little.

 

I cleaned up the plugs and re-gaped them to 0.76mm. Yes, subaru specs 0.85, but just from experience I've found EJ's idle way smoother with a smaller gap. Timing is probably ever so slightly off in the tune to meet emissions.

 

Cracked open the fuel tank and checked the pump.

Someone had installed a Walbro 255 (nice....) and left the stock 'subaru negative fuel capacitor' setup hooked up. Its an oddball thing, so we removed the stock wiring and put the genuine Walbro wiring kit into the harness\pump.

Noticing the pump was less than 2 years old, and the fuel sock pretty clean, we threw him back in.

 

Next was injectors. One friend was certain; 2 injectors going at once would be 'near impossible' but the crud we found inside it were scary. I wish I got pictures.

we're talking large grain of sand deposits stuck to the spray, and 1mm thick crud around the entire injector in general (never good...)

The inside of the rail looked clean now though; so I'd say its buildup over the 15 years of running.

 

Some new injectors helped majorly. But we still had somewhat (< understatement) rough idle.

 

Injectors show similar Ohm's (good) and the wiring loom seems to have various identical reading on both positive and ground, between the 'good' side and the bad; so the loom seems A-OK.

Turns out, some numpty had the old style 'dumb' Idle air control valve at maximum adjustment. Calming that down restored warm idle near perfect.

 

So we're left with a car that hates life when cold.

We're yet to be able to inspect the plugs yet, its only done 20km (too soon, junior).

Anyone have any ideas of what we've missed?

 

I'm thinking the lean condition could be during idle only, because you tend to hear Boxer engines pretty clearly when they ping at high revvs.

Also that always open IACV that we re-adjusted lets its air in on the 'lean' side we found.

 

I'm running out of ideas to smooth this bad boy out entirely.

They only have a single Air\Fuel sensor, so that's the next trial. Subaru's are happy to have it unplugged and just run a little rich. 

The Air Flow meter is a known working unit from a car that got a Speed Density tune and 'didn't need it'.

 

The only extra thing to add is that the engine does have 5~7psi lower compression figures on that side of the engine. So it could be leak down mechanical leaning.

But I'm thinking, to be that lean, we'd be smelling fuel in the oil and it's holding up pretty well.

 

Besides the A\F (o2) sensor, and the MAF, can anyone think of what we've overlooked?

 

Not a bad night of testing for 4 hours and 2 cans of coke :)

 

 

And feel free to ask questions! basic shit, tire pressures, fuel types, Octane ratings, whatever. Open the floor :)


Edited by Master_Scythe, 08 May 2015 - 11:09 AM.

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#2 half-fix

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Posted 08 May 2015 - 11:44 AM

im in the process of getting my GQ patrol registered last thing is to have have rear lights replaced (bulbs rusted into the sockets and the housing was cracked) getting the correct air con belt for the td42 is annoying. but funds are too low for the requied roady and registeration etc



#3 Rybags

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Posted 08 May 2015 - 12:18 PM

Overlooked?  Maybe check for possible air leaks in the intake path.  Also, dirty MAF or malfunctioning temp senders could contribute to a bad cold idle.

Have you checked if any fault codes present in the ECU?

If you don't have the proper scanner, it's worth a look online - some cars, especially before OBD2 have a technique (usually paperclip job) to get a code readout without any extra hardware.

 

Recent car adventure - a mate buys/sells cars.  I've recently gone into a couple with him as joint venture and bought/sold one myself.

Got a 2003 Camry for $1,200 - thought it was to be a sure thing to nearly triple our money.

Didn't turn out to be quite the case.  Failed the rego inspection due to both front lower control arm bushes (rear inner mount) being totally worn out.

Our workshop guy rang Pedders and the guy told him it's a 6 hour job involving having to jack up the engine to gain access and a bunch of fiddling about.

Turned out he was either mistaken for another model or full of shit.  Put the car on jack stands and everything is accessable.  Still fiddly, but both control arms come off in about 10 minutes flat.

Getting them back in proved to be not quite so easy.  We made the mistake of taking a lunch break, and after getting rid of some pesky visitors the reinstall of the second side took way longer than it should have.

Still... $60 cost rather than probably $600+

Car sold, not quite the hoped for profit but $400 each is better than a kick in the 'nads.



#4 SquallStrife

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Posted 08 May 2015 - 12:28 PM

I had an LT Focus Zetec until last Friday.

It was a good car, fun to drive, but jesus christ they made some dumb engine bay design decisions.

E.g. The battery is hidden underneath the plastic "shelf" below the windscreen, and the bonnet latch is linked to the key barrel by a telescoping plastic rod held in place by friction.

That's my rant. It's in repairable-writeoff-heaven now. Buying a new car tomorrow.

Edited by SquallStrife, 08 May 2015 - 12:28 PM.

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#5 Rybags

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Posted 08 May 2015 - 12:33 PM

I like some of the Focuses, esp the fast ones.  Never driven one though.

 

Plenty of modern cars have stupid engine bay design.  Also, seen a recent Commodore 6?  There's so much plastic shit that you can't even see any of the engine.

It's a statement of the modern car.   It's become an appliance and you have no business going near the innards.  The only things you touch are the yellow caps for oil, water, coolant.  Everything else is under that tupperware crap and you pay the dealership a bucket of cash to maintain it for you.

 

These battery and terminal covers are a bit of a joke.  They do little to stop dirt or sulphur compound buildup on the battery or terminals, in fact they just serve to hide it.



#6 SquallStrife

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Posted 08 May 2015 - 12:36 PM

Mine wasn't an RS or anything super sporty, just the "luxury" model with the 2.0L engine and 5sp manual transmission.
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#7 Cybes

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Posted 08 May 2015 - 04:57 PM

Last time I messed around with a car was last century!  It was an Alfa built in 1968.  The engine bay could probably have accommodated a small V8 at today's packing densities, but there was just a ~2L inline 4 sitting in there with a good 15-20cm of airgap all around.

 

Disc brakes, LSD*, 5-speed transmission, 2OHC, extractor exhaust, twin dual-chokes carbs, and monocoque construction were about as advanced as things got for when it was made, but that was old tech even in the '90s.  What pollution controls?  What do you mean by "energy-absorbing geometry"?  What are "air bags"?  Side intrusion?

(*Diff, not drug you comedian!)

 

Considering what I used to put that (and earlier) beastie through, it's a miracle I lived long enough to get sick. ;p


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#8 chrisg

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Posted 08 May 2015 - 06:03 PM

:)

 

I've just been getting back to DIY after a long sojourn.

 

I used to really enjoy working on my own cars, sort of grew up on it in the UK but my real era was similar to Cybes, Fiats from 73 on and so engaged with them that I had a repeat time with a restored - semi really, X1/9 in 98 for a couple of years.

 

i think like many home mechanics I took a look under the hood on a Pug 406 I bought in about 2000 and decided time to find a real mechanic - which I did and he has been great, but expensive and he is just really hard to get to for anything but major services.

 

I now have a smaller Pug, a 307, it actually suits me way better and I really agree with Ry, most of that plastic in the engine bay is crap. Been progressively assessing and removing it.

 

I did not make the mistake of losing my tools when I stopped DIY, but I did have an interesting hiatus when I wanted some new ramps that allow me under this nothing more than cute hatch but suits for now - damned thing is quite low. I found some good ABS ramps but in the land of wait-awhile took some time to turn up - about six months :)

 

That actually wrapped around to now - 40C under a car - not fun :)

 

Shall be back in there very soon, soon as this week actually, so long as rain stays away :)

 

I have nfi on your turbo thing M_S, the only thing I really know about turbos is if someone is messing with them it is a REALLY good idea to cross the street to avoid the explosion :)

 

However, seems you know what you are doing so I'll just chuck in one thing that may not even exist on the car - I had a year once of an under-warranty situation that whilst not costing me money, did cost me time, because the repair agent was clueless, of lamba (?)) sensors being installed back to front.....

 

Conventional and established wisdom says make things one-way - seems the French have yet to learn :)

 

Cheers

 

 

 

 


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#9 aliali

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Posted 09 May 2015 - 08:19 PM

 

the only thing I really know about turbos is if someone is messing with them it is a REALLY good idea to cross the street to avoid the explosion :)

Start at about 2 minutes :-)


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#10 Rybags

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Posted 09 May 2015 - 10:44 PM

Lisa Rogers... *drool*

 

Went halves in a 2000 Astra yesterday arvo.  Rush job to fix a CV boot retaining clip and restore the headlights before getting a rego inspection just in time at the end of the day.

Was amazed at how the headlights came out.  They were yellow and foggy to the extent of being an obvious fail.  I did the 3 sanding stages and wasn't impressed at all with the result.

Then spray on the laquer.  Aside from a bit too much applied to one with an obvious bit of dribble, they look good as new.

 

Spent a while today giving it a wash/clean and went to the wreckers and got a door side molding and another glovebox.

Bit of a ding and scratch in the rear quarter, put my 1337 panel beating skills to the test by removing a storage panel from the boot trim then pushed it out with my foot... so trading 2 largish impressions for 4 smaller ones.

Remaining issues are the remote on key doesn't work, yet to try the resync to car trick which hopefully should fix that - and the ventilation blower does nothing.

Supposedly the resistor block can go bad or just cut out and work again by plug/unplug so I guess it might be out with the glovebox again to get at that stuff.



#11 stadl

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Posted 10 May 2015 - 10:29 AM

I'm a car tragic. Like them, know very little bit about them - enough to be dangerous, Like buying tools to fix them, but rarely get around to doing anything... pay mechanic.

 

the Forester is a daily drive and gets taken to a mechanic - if I end up halfway though a service on the weekend and need a part, I can't be without it during the week. 

 

I've done a few oil changes and basic services on the elise partly for fun, and partly because I haven't found a local mech I trust yet... But SSC has been travelling to Adelaide from Sydney every couple of years, so I get big work done then,

Next service will be a full fluid drop, replace a dicky O2 sensor in the exhaust (all stuff I would do) but they are visiting (hopefully this month) and I also want to upgrade the brakes and the rear toe links.

 

Financially, I think I've spent far more on tools, than I have saved on servicing, but it's a hobby, so they sort of go like that.


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#12 Gas Lee

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Posted 11 May 2015 - 07:05 AM

I would have said that I'm the car tragic, I've had heaps. I usually buy them cheap, have fun in them for 9-12 months and then move them on.

 

Recent toys include a Nissan Cefiro, an R33 Skyline, a 77 Chrysler Lancer and an LS1 VX Calais.


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#13 Master_Scythe

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Posted 11 May 2015 - 09:19 AM

Overlooked?  Maybe check for possible air leaks in the intake path.  Also, dirty MAF or malfunctioning temp senders could contribute to a bad cold idle.

Have you checked if any fault codes present in the ECU?

If you don't have the proper scanner, it's worth a look online - some cars, especially before OBD2 have a technique (usually paperclip job) to get a code readout without any extra hardware.

 

Yeah I own a proper scantool; the ECU is clean of codes; we did a hard reset anyway (in subarus that = Green to green plugs, and it does a factory reset).

MAF is always a concern for EJ20's, it was such an issue for so long. But a failed MAF should show an overall lean, or overall rich condition, not just 2 banks.

Coolant temp sensor could be s thing though..... good thinking.....


 LS1 VX Calais.

 

 

Did you sell her before skipping town?


Lisa Rogers... *drool*

 

Went halves in a 2000 Astra yesterday arvo.  Rush job to fix a CV boot retaining clip and restore the headlights before getting a rego inspection just in time at the end of the day.

Was amazed at how the headlights came out.  They were yellow and foggy to the extent of being an obvious fail.  I did the 3 sanding stages and wasn't impressed at all with the result.

Then spray on the laquer.  Aside from a bit too much applied to one with an obvious bit of dribble, they look good as new.

 

Spent a while today giving it a wash/clean and went to the wreckers and got a door side molding and another glovebox.

Bit of a ding and scratch in the rear quarter, put my 1337 panel beating skills to the test by removing a storage panel from the boot trim then pushed it out with my foot... so trading 2 largish impressions for 4 smaller ones.

Remaining issues are the remote on key doesn't work, yet to try the resync to car trick which hopefully should fix that - and the ventilation blower does nothing.

Supposedly the resistor block can go bad or just cut out and work again by plug/unplug so I guess it might be out with the glovebox again to get at that stuff.

 

Nice work :) 

Its amazing how well restoring headlights works, isn't it?

Whack a coat of UV reflecting wax (or even armorall) on it once a week and it wont yellow again.

 

Also, you have the "Self Destructing Engine" in that car; tldr version, the timing belts were a failure from day 1.

After market belts fix the problem.

It may be cheaper to wait till it blows, then buy a second engine these days, with the belt done; but generally, mechanics did them at 75000kms instead of 100k~150k (depending on which dealer\country you're from) due to so many total failures.

 

Quick story about those; Mums friend bought one in factory condition (it was unbelievable! brand new for 14 years old!); anyway, I've said "How many K's on it?"

"Only 80 thousand" she replied,

"Ah, Nice, but get that timing belt done this week. Nice car" (i meant it, for a ladies daily drive it was mint!).

"My mechanic said I don't need to worry about that till 100~120 thousand"

"Yeah, but..." *talked over*

"I THINK my mechanic know more than YOU"

 

K, no big, she's always been an uppity little woman, have your fun. 

8 days later, exactly, engine lunched itself with a snapped timing belt.


Edited by Master_Scythe, 11 May 2015 - 09:22 AM.

Wherever you go in life, watch out for Scythe, the tackling IT support guy.

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#14 Gas Lee

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Posted 11 May 2015 - 09:34 AM

 LS1 VX Calais.

 

 

Did you sell her before skipping town?

 

 

Negative, Pretty blue land barge is safely stashed.


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#15 Master_Scythe

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Posted 11 May 2015 - 09:36 AM

 

 LS1 VX Calais.

 

 

Did you sell her before skipping town?

 

 

Negative, Pretty blue land barge is safely stashed.

 

 

Considering the BUCKETS of comfort that thing had, sacrificing 10% or something to some handling mods would make that thing a real beast. It was a nice ride!


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#16 chrisg

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Posted 11 May 2015 - 11:18 AM

Hmm,

 

What I thought was a bit of an odd one.

 

My wife has not been driving her car for quite a while due to illness but is very determined to get back behind the wheel. Being left un-driven her car, two door Lancer coupe, 2005 I think, ended up with a flat battery. I only had a God alone knows how old trickle charger which deemed the battery unable to be charged. Well, it really is not a very old battery, less than 12 months. A mate brought around a fairly old Projecta SC4000 battery charger which promptly got to work and the battery is now re-charged.

 

So having decided a less intelligent or perhaps more willing charger would be a good thing I headed off to Super Cheap yesterday, they stock Projecta. Was told that the one my mate has is no longer made but was a classic, that brand now offers a model that makes no claims about re-charging a dead battery but does "maintain" a charge. That would be fine if the car was garaged, it's under a carport.

 

I was recommended to go with a home brand SCA unit that features the ability to charge from zero volts.

 

Got it home, tiny thing compared to what I'm used to, but it seems to tick all the boxes, except it says it is ideal for batteries up to 500 CCA.

 

I had to dredge my memory to even recall what CCA is, "Cold Crank Amps?"

 

I dunno what CCA rating the battery is, the labellng does not mention it, but memory says that 500 would be more than adequate for the Lancer and besides a charger just might take longer to charge up a higher rated battery, I would think ?

 

Obviously I don't need to be charging this battery right now but I am wondering if I should not return this little charger.

 

Any thoughts?

 

Cheers


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#17 Rybags

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Posted 11 May 2015 - 11:30 AM

Plenty of retailer and battery makers have selectors like this http://www.superchar...ch-your-vehicle

 

Generally cars will use a battery with a healthy amount of headroom re CCA provided vs what's needed.

 

Extreme e.g. A Hyundai Excel with a 1.5 litre engine which you could almost start by hand uses the same battery as Falcons/Commodores of the same era.

Then you get others, from memory Imprezza uses a piddly battery compared to what you might expect.

 

It's good to have a charger around.  The cheap ones ~ $30-$40 will do the job.  A battery will run flat on it's own in 5-6 weeks, installed in a car it'll go flat quicker since there's standby use generally by the security/entry system.  A battery outside of it's prime might get to the point of struggling to be able to start the car after only 2-3 weeks although still have another couple of years service life left in it.



#18 Master_Scythe

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Posted 11 May 2015 - 11:30 AM

Yep, CCA is cold crank amps, and its VERY over-rated.

There's a great video on youtube of a guy with a 6Cyl Diesel (so compression engine, notoriously hard to turn over) being started with a 9Ah SLA battery from jaycar.

I'm sure it wouldnt do it long, but it works.

 

Myself, I use a dry-cell motorcycle battery in all my cars. Its a decent weight saving, very cheap, and has a 'wow' factor for the bling scene.

Various sizes of this series.

http://www.ebay.com....=item338c61a1f6

Depends what shape\size best suits the 'look' im going for under the hood.

 

The battery ONLY starts the car, and once running, ONLY handles my 'doof doof' :P

it doesn't need to be big

 

I'm a big fan of CTEK which are on special at the moment.

https://www.ozbargai....au/node/192997

 

For trickle charging I use a small solar panel outside, with leads coming inside. It barely registers any charge at all, but it 'slows the drain' which is all I personally need.

 

In short, you're saying thus:

You own a 'smart charger' that see's too high a resistive load to charge a battery at 0v.

Your solution is to buy the absolute cheapest 'Dumb' charger you can get.

 

Sounds like an OK plan to me.

 

Personally, I have a few 2.5A, 13.9v laptop chargers that are 'Junk' laying around which I cut the tip off and use for an hour to get above 0V, but I'm ghetto like that, and pretty confident with DC volts.

 

 

EDIT: that 'up to 500CCA' is to cover their ass. 

You could use it on a 10KA battery if you wanted to. It might take 10 years to charge it, but it'll be fine.

Mine gave me 5 years of service before it finally ate itself alive from over-use.

Since then, its been flawless laptop chargers, and a couple of battery clips from jaycar for me :)


Edited by Master_Scythe, 11 May 2015 - 11:39 AM.

Wherever you go in life, watch out for Scythe, the tackling IT support guy.

"I don't care what race you are, not one f*cking bit, if you want to be seen as a good people, you go in there and you f*ck up the people who (unofficially) represent you in a negative light!"


#19 chrisg

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Posted 11 May 2015 - 11:42 AM

:)

 

Thanks guys.

 

I honestly have no idea where my charger that turned its nose up at the battery came from, must be at least 20 years old, could be longer but does seem too smart for its own good.

 

This little SCA will suit me fine it seems although it does make some claims of being "smart," sounds like the micro industry of battery chargers has discovered FUD :)

 

Cheers


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#20 Master_Scythe

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Posted 11 May 2015 - 11:48 AM

Our workshop guy rang Pedders and the guy told him it's a 6 hour job involving having to jack up the engine to gain access and a bunch of fiddling about.

Turned out he was either mistaken for another model or full of shit.  

 

It's the latter.

 

It must be store policy to overquote and undercharge.

Good policy, but not by that much.

 

I have a set of stuts and springs, assembled ready to go. I have a stuck lower bolt that I need a workshop level rattlegun to remove.

"How much to install 2 shock absobers, assembled, strust and springs, ready to go"

"Ohh at least 4 hours, and $300"

 

jokers.

 

Bought a rattlegun and compressor for $200 (both were on 'end of line' clearance; rattelgun was $16 down from $380, lol), and will do it this weekend.

Bloody Pedders man, I'm tellin ya!


:)

 

Thanks guys.

 

I honestly have no idea where my charger that turned its nose up at the battery came from, must be at least 20 years old, could be longer but does seem too smart for its own good.

 

This little SCA will suit me fine it seems although it does make some claims of being "smart," sounds like the micro industry of battery chargers has discovered FUD :)

 

Cheers

 

Open it up. There's no warranty stickers usually; look and dont touch :)

I bought the literal "Best Buy" brand charger from supercheap; was entirely an inverter and a resistor. Relying on the natural resistive rise of the battery to stop it.

Worked fine.

 

They're making good profit on a box with 2 simple parts in it, lol.


Edited by Master_Scythe, 11 May 2015 - 11:48 AM.

Wherever you go in life, watch out for Scythe, the tackling IT support guy.

"I don't care what race you are, not one f*cking bit, if you want to be seen as a good people, you go in there and you f*ck up the people who (unofficially) represent you in a negative light!"






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