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Win 7 Crashing As It Wakes Out Of Sleep

Windows 7 Crash Sleep

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#1 Camsie

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 12:12 AM

So recently, I've developed a problem where, more often then not, when I wake my Win 7, 64-bit PC out of sleep (note: not hibernation, my desktop doesn't have this feature), the machine doesn't wake properly into it's pre-sleep state, but rather stalls for a second, then reboots. Obviously, it's crashing upon waking up, but the trouble is, I can't seem to get a clue as to what's causing it.

 

I have software called "WhoCrashed", which is normally pretty good at sniffing out OS-crash causes, by examining the logs in C:Windows\Minidump and C:\Windows\memory.dmp except in these recent cases, whatever is causing the crash isn't leaving any logs behind. At least, none that I can find.

 

There are also no recent entries in my general program crash dump folder.

 

Any idea on how I can track what's going on?


Edited by Camsie, 17 February 2017 - 12:15 AM.


#2 Rybags

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 12:24 AM

Hibernation shouldn't require any special features, you just need to enable it.  It's essentially a save state followed by power-down although you can get issues on re startup like graphical glitches or worse.

 

In my experience hibernation isn't so useful anymore as big Ram systems can take longer to do the hibernate/resume sequence than doing a plain shutdown/restart, and probably even moreseo with modern OSes since they have hybrid shutdown anyway.

 

Sleep/resume problems are pretty common and something as simple as a non conformal USB device or dodgy driver can be sufficient to screw things up.  I have an inherent sleep problem with my Macbook in that a boot sector patch is needed to put the system into AHCI mode before Win 7 boots with the side-effect that a sleep/resume will always BSOD.

 

You could debug the situation by removing peripherals and components one at a time or just do without Sleep.  It's not so useful on desktops anyway and thanks to modern CPUs and GPUs having pretty good power management an idle PC will use a good deal less power than those of 10 years ago.

 

A better idea might be to try streamline the boot process and just use shutdown/restart.  Or maybe get hibernate going and see how it goes.  I've only bothered to enable it myself because my UPS will use it if there's an extended power interruption.



#3 Nich...

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 10:37 AM

Have you tested the memory to see if that's error-free?
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#4 Jeruselem

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 12:25 PM

What devices you have? Some devices just HATE sleep or hiberation.


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#5 Master_Scythe

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Posted 20 February 2017 - 11:04 AM

If you have an older SSD, my moneys on that.


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#6 Rybags

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Posted 20 February 2017 - 11:14 AM

The thing is, it worked then it didn't.  So my guess would be that it's physical config change, altered Bios setting or more likely a driver or Windows update item has come along and just screwed everything up.



#7 Master_Scythe

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Posted 20 February 2017 - 11:15 AM

The thing is, it worked then it didn't.  So my guess would be that it's physical config change, altered Bios setting or more likely a driver or Windows update item has come along and just screwed everything up.

 

Good points.

My only thinking was that is it was old enough, SSD's had a habit of writing the same blocks at startup\standby\hibernate when they were 'brand new tech', so you often get bad b locks that the file system isnt checking.

At least in my experience. And we're talking VERY old drives by SSD standards....


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#8 Jeruselem

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Posted 20 February 2017 - 12:49 PM

Win7 was also an OS not totally optimised for SSD drives, I think win8 and win10 were better optimised for SSD drives.


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#9 @~thehung

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Posted 20 February 2017 - 06:05 PM

​​

​you say its happening more often than not, so it might be hard to isolate.  how common is it?

​maybe try terminating any non-essential programs and services and disconnecting all external devices, and see if you can replicate it.


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