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g__day

Member Since 10 Sep 2008
Offline Last Active Dec 03 2017 10:12 AM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: Gigabyte X299 Aorus 7- how to get the memory to 300 MHz?

30 November 2017 - 04:24 PM

About 20 times faster than before - it was definitely CPU bound before :)


In Topic: Gigabyte X299 Aorus 7- how to get the memory to 300 MHz?

27 November 2017 - 12:10 PM

Adia64 confirms yes 3,000 MHz - success! Many thanks all!


In Topic: Gigabyte X299 Aorus 7- how to get the memory to 300 MHz?

27 November 2017 - 02:41 AM

Well further development - nothing I did at the BIOS seemed to give the desired result.  I tried the Gigabtye Windows utility for overclocking and selected only RAM - shifted it to 3000 MHz - rebooted - Windows Performance manager still said it was 2133MHz but CPU-Z and Futuremark seem to think its 3000MHz RAM.

 

They sure don't go out of their way to documenting things well or making life easy!


In Topic: Gigabyte X299 Aorus 7- how to get the memory to 300 MHz?

27 November 2017 - 12:59 AM

Yes - memory frequency appears at 3000 MHz and 2133 MHz - with no documentation as to why two numbers appear nor what informs the BIOS as to which number to choose.  More sleuthing required!


In Topic: Gigabyte X299 Aorus 7- how to get the memory to 300 MHz?

26 November 2017 - 07:49 PM

Monitor solution found thanks to doctor google!  Under BIOS -> boot - RoG advises turn CSM off - disabling capability system mode switched screen straight away so not my landscape 30" Kogan presents the BIOS boot screen staright away and now the portrait Acer and Samsung are inert - which I can live with.  Finally I can read the BIOS without twisting my neck off!

 

Thanks all!

 

Now I just have to figure out why the BIOS RAM frequency with XMP says 100 MHz with 30 multiplier but shows speed as both 3000 MHz and 2133 MHz - then selects the 2133 MHz option.  Back to Google I reckon.  It was only on youtube I discovered that although the Corsair RAM is very good - and is stable at 3000 MHz - someone, somewhere defines that as an overclock - versus a marketed clock - and obscures what you have to do to achieve this rated clocking speed.