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Learning multiple languages
kikz
post Jan 23 2012, 10:36 PM
Post #21
Hero
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http://www.tiobe.com/index.php/content/pap...tpci/index.html
Python isn't that popular...
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.:Cyb3rGlitch:.
post Jan 23 2012, 10:43 PM
Post #22
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I wish more people started learning Scala, it's so much better than Java. It's like people are scared of functional programming.

This post has been edited by .:Cyb3rGlitch:.: Jan 23 2012, 10:44 PM


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"Great minds discuss ideas; Average minds discuss events; Small minds discuss people." - Eleanor Roosevelt
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kikz
post Jan 23 2012, 10:49 PM
Post #23
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QUOTE (.:Cyb3rGlitch:. @ Jan 23 2012, 11:43 PM) *
I wish more people started learning Scala, it's so much better than Java. It's like people are scared of functional programming.

It's probably a useful think. Functional languages aren't as useful as the procedural languages and their derivitives (esp OO). Particularly in the applications world where the top languages rule.
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.:Cyb3rGlitch:.
post Jan 23 2012, 10:50 PM
Post #24
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Hero




QUOTE (kikz @ Jan 23 2012, 11:49 PM) *
QUOTE (.:Cyb3rGlitch:. @ Jan 23 2012, 11:43 PM) *
I wish more people started learning Scala, it's so much better than Java. It's like people are scared of functional programming.

It's probably a useful think. Functional languages aren't as useful as the procedural languages and their derivitives (esp OO). Particularly in the applications world where the top languages rule.

Scala is functional and object orientated. It also supports Java libraries without any special considerations or boilerplate code. It's quite elegant.

EDIT: Here's a quick overview (it's by no means thorough though).

This post has been edited by .:Cyb3rGlitch:.: Jan 23 2012, 10:52 PM


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superfireydave
post Jan 26 2012, 05:33 PM
Post #25
Atomican
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QUOTE (.:Cyb3rGlitch:. @ Jan 23 2012, 10:43 PM) *
I wish more people started learning Scala, it's so much better than Java. It's like people are scared of functional programming.

It probably has to do with the fact it's a very niche market. Scala is to Java what Ruby is to PHP.

PHP is popular because it's installed on a lot of cheap servers, it's relatively similar to C in terms of syntax, and despite being horribly verbose, only recently introducing namespacing, having very little open sourced libraries, and having a horrible package system it's the predominant web language.

Java is similarly popular because it's relatively similar to C style syntax, has some niceties that you don't get in various C languages (maybe C# has them?) that make it harder to kill your application, and because people like to code literally everything to do in Java (so you see Java desktop apps, Java web services, Java web applications, Java games etc).

Scala is a lot nicer than Java, it's not as verbose (although it's not nearly as terse as Ruby which is a shame), and it's the sort of language that helps you do your work, rather than make you do more (see: PHP, Java, and any other language where you have 50 lines of code that could be condensed into 10). If I was going to be developing the backend for a web app that had a heap of users, I'd be using Scala (that's what Twitter do, and it seems to be working pretty well since they moved from Rails).

Sidenote: Python seems to be quite nice. I'd prefer Ruby over it, just because it's got a bigger/more active community, but I've been using CoffeeScript heavily as of late, and the idea of your code's formatting being important is nice (and it enforces the other developers who work on my code to keep it looking nice!)


QUOTE (kikz @ Jan 23 2012, 10:36 PM) *

Depends where you're looking :)
https://github.com/languages
Most of the projects and developers I'm interested have work on github, so find that to be a more authoratative source - for me - than Tiobe's results.



Finally: to the OP: if you're interested in cutting edge sort of stuff, getting to grips with JavaScript and CoffeeScript is a great idea, understanding a-synchronous UI's, and then checking out Node.js would be a pretty good idea.

This post has been edited by superfireydave: Jan 26 2012, 05:40 PM
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kikz
post Jan 26 2012, 08:02 PM
Post #26
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don't see how, dave (of course, you did say projects you're interested in...). C# social devs will primarily be using codeplex, and tiobe looks at the professional space, which wouldn't be users of github. At least I'd probably not allow a policy stating to store my trade secret code on github... :p

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superfireydave
post Jan 27 2012, 04:07 PM
Post #27
Atomican
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QUOTE (kikz @ Jan 26 2012, 08:02 PM) *
and tiobe looks at the professional space, which wouldn't be users of github. At least I'd probably not allow a policy stating to store my trade secret code on github... :p

Well github does offer private plans, and you get companies like Twitter, Facebook, and Joyent hosting things on github, which for me is a lot more meaningful than the company down the road that employs developers who still code like it's 1990 (or who still use SVN - bleurgh :P)
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kikz
post Jan 27 2012, 04:31 PM
Post #28
Hero
Titan




hey I can't argue with what you find meaningful, that's your business :p

however, it's hardly representative of the most used languages when its nature excludes the vast majority of users of particular languages :)
(not to mention you can code like it's 1990 and post to github, like a milllion backyard hackers :p including me :p)
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SilverShaft
post Apr 9 2012, 02:41 PM
Post #29
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Nearly everything I see in my day to day work at a large financial revolves around primarily python/perl and java. I think you'll find python hasn't got a large market share in these polls as its generally employed as scripts rather than for full blown programs. Look at the linux space for an idea of what I mean, things like package managers, daemons etc. This probably translates to fewer occurances in the polls as these scripts often go unpublished outside of their respective projects.

Personally, I cut code in Bash, Ruby, Python, Perl, Java and PHP almost everyday in my job. I also have used C/C++ extensively but it was working as an embedded developer so not exactly an atypical usecase.

My advice for anyone starting out is to learn Ruby, Java and Python in that order. If you wish to continue from there you should be able to pick up most languages. C/C++ is a nice side excursion that will solidify your skillsets across all languages but as mentioned earlier in the thread, they are just painful to use these days in comparison.

This post has been edited by SilverShaft: Apr 9 2012, 02:42 PM
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