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chrisg

Superherø
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Everything posted by chrisg

  1. chrisg

    Hey Chrisg... name the aircraft.

    :) There's a few around elf - The Boeing museum in Seattle has one, complete with drone, Wright Patterson has one in Dayton and the Smithsonian in Washington. The last I looked NASA aslso still had one active at Edwards for research. Those were Doomsday plans K, if the Cold War had have ever heated up all the RAF could do was try to get our nuclear bombers on to targets in Russia and try to stop theirs from hitting their targets. both were thought of as rather forlorn hopes, the Vs were not quite fast enough or long-ranged enough to handle it by the seventies and sheer weight of numbers with Russian heavy bombers, their more reliable aircraft, especially covered by long range fighters, made getting them all just about impossible and you only had to miss one... For both sides in the air it would have been one-way trips. It would have been an ICBM/SSBM war anyway, the UK's only real deterrent was and is the nuclear subs, enough unstoppable warheads to exact a lot of revenge for a dead island... Thank God it never happened, although the danger is by no means over. Cheers
  2. chrisg

    Hey Chrisg... name the aircraft.

    :) Probably because of local conditions 1shot, as in Oz.... Kit has never been a big thing with American front-liners, always more...... Luxury ... :) Cheers
  3. chrisg

    Hey Chrisg... name the aircraft.

    :) Yeah K... Losing an airplane... bit more investigation - I really do sympathise with the ground troops and the ground vehicles (hey, you cannot be a good pilot and not have airplane empathy :) ) I would guess having thought about it that it is mostly a one-way trip for ground vehicles, although I'd bet they try to recover M-1s :) Cheers
  4. chrisg

    Hey Chrisg... name the aircraft.

    It was in their game plans, only because nothing else at the time could go in in front of the rather slow bombers, range issues. They had a problem - a big one - their missiles were optimised for hitting barn doors, not agile little fighters, and we had a supposedly good close in jammer - that's a bit of a pucker factor, but they would have had little answer to suicidal F-4s :) Mad time..... Lovely airplane, in Russian terms it was even reliable, politics has no say in standing back and looking at good engineering :) Cheers
  5. chrisg

    We haven't had one of these for a while

    :) But she likes that... or so she says :) Cybes I look forward to meeting in November :) Cheers
  6. chrisg

    Hey Chrisg... name the aircraft.

    Had no real choice PL. The paranoia years. Two primary scenarios: Either they initiated or we did, and whilst we always said we would not sometimes/often pre-emptive has best chance. If they did there were a multitude of scenarios, starting with getting away from anything likely to suntan us, then find some fuel then deal with whatever was coming. Russian tactics, and equipment, suggested that after the ICBMs would come the Bears and Bison, covered by Fiddlers - their other fighters just didn't have the range. We did, with F-4s, and French assistance, plus tankers, but that was going to be a hard fight and likely to be fuel driven. Best hope fpr personal survival, depending upon bomber routes, was likely to be hit them until out of weapons, run away, eject over Sweden.... Lovely job I used to have.... :) If we initiated we had a little more control, could put tankers out as far as the curtain, hope to catch them off-guard with the probable Fiddlers not too close so we could tank and run in ahead and nail them to protect the bombers - a mix of stuff there, V's, alert -52's, French Mirage IV's. Either way to get out and take them out we were always going to go under the SAM curtain, low, which is fuel hungry,then hit as far as possible from the bombers, we knew we could beat them, better position, better manouvering, better weapons, better radar, so long as we ignored the fuel racing past bingo :) It truly was mad, and never happened, thank god, the line was pretty thin, but, we were pretty good, when Authors comes back you can, if you have not yet, read a story I placed in there of those years. One of the many problems was if anyone went EMP. We would probably not, they truly did care less about their forward assets, if they could down a bomber wave that way I doubt they would have hesitated. It was never a gelled plan, much as it tried, but, if you can find it, have a look at Russian availability for aircraft in that time - we had plus 80%, they we lurking below 40.... makes a difference... I have NO idea how I could have contributed in my last tour, on Harriers - way too little range, strategic planners need an enema and an IQ injection. VERY little point in using an aircraft with less range than a stand-off missile to engage its carrier, when you have no answer to the missile launch.... A lot of reasons why I drifted into analysis and why many armchair warriors run away if my name appears :) Been there done, done that, have the PTSS.... :) Cheers
  7. chrisg

    I raise my (metaphorical) glass to "that guy"

    :) Pay forward, it always works :) Cheers
  8. chrisg

    Hey Chrisg... name the aircraft.

    :) I suppose if any ground vehicle sees action or a lot of travel it is likely to get attritioned far more than an aircraft or ship.... Makes sense, wouldn't really know, personal is aircraft, close friends are Navy and SF, don't have much in the way of tanker contacts. There was a Russian aircraft that filled those shoes PL, TU-28 Fiddler... no real equivalent. In my service days we had only one answer to those guys, use whatever means to get inside with something nimble, down them and eject, because no way you would have fuel to go home :) :) Cheers
  9. chrisg

    Hey Chrisg... name the aircraft.

    :) Yeah, DM is a complex place, it is not as often referred to really a "boneyard" a lot of aircraft return to service. The A-10s have rotated through several times. they also do comprehensive service work and for long-term high value assets, which is a funny description - some trainers are deemed that way, not because they cost a lot, but because the lines are closed - they use "mummification" techniques to preserve the aircraft against future use. Every time I go there it bemuses me a little that the oldest aircraft, heavy piston transports, are mostly the least cannibalised. Those are truly unique, but are the easist to deploy in third world situations lacking jet fuel. They built those aircraft to really last, there are some pristine examples of aircraft like C-119s, C-124s, C-130s, C-133s there. They also take particular care of prototypes that didn't make it, because some of the tech in those might turn out to be unique and best to be preserved. One, I think totally absent from DM aircraft, but I could be wrong, you can never see everything there, is the A-11/A-12/SR-71 "Blackbirds." Some have been shipped off to museums but the titanium bodies are just too valuable. That's an interesting question Invicta, I don't know. Aircraft wind up at DM, ships mostly at Newport, there must be a place for wheeled/tracked storage, but I don't know where, Bragg or Benning possibly? Funnily enough I DO know that the Russians do that, a place whose name I cannot recall in Siberia. Cheers
  10. chrisg

    Hey Chrisg... name the aircraft.

    Hmm, I don't recall if they chopped up the -52s at DM or not... The YF-4 drone programme has been running for ages but yeah, some will go to that but unless things have changed since I was last there a couple of years ago quite a number of F-4s are held in good condition for various contingencies - they are still a highly capable aircraft. Several allies have some earmarked in the event of needing rapid replenishment, plenty of F-4 skills still in service, and a few, a very few, go back into service as Wild Weasels from time to time as others rotate off that duty for a rest. Cheers
  11. Wow!!! Mac was sure right, Melbourne Cup week/Spring Carnival - melbourne is BOOKED!!! Had to really chase around to get what we wanted but finally got a two bedroom apartment in Burwood.... looks like a nice place though, The Punt Hill, but bit of a trek into the city, ah well, only have to go twice. :) Cheers
  12. chrisg

    Hey Chrisg... name the aircraft.

    :) Wasn't looking for cars. Yeah that's true OJ, although those went to the crusher. Cheers
  13. chrisg

    We haven't had one of these for a while

    :) khir? All around great bloke - never met him, but he is :) Cheers
  14. chrisg

    Hey Chrisg... name the aircraft.

    :) Thet are MiB, they -52 finished production long ago but persists in service, and production was never anything like that of the F-4, which exceeded 5000. There are not many F-4s left in operation anymore, so not much parts demand. The B-1s are similar, smallish run, still in service, parts needed, notably wings and probably hinge assemblies. I found what I'm pretty certain is the F-111B, right where it was last time I was there, but it does strike me that this is probably quite a recent photo, it shows a LOT of F-14s, but full retirement was not long ago. However not TOO recent since they are now well into breaking up the F-14s as a matter of security to keep the parts out of the hands of Iran. What I wouldn't give to pick up one of those T-38s cheap - would make a sweet company jet :) Cheers
  15. chrisg

    Where's That Warranty Card?

    It's more a case that in summer the available power grids have spare power, in winter the consumer demand rises and so does the price of power to large users. Cheers
  16. Gah!!!!! Half the cops I know are dopers - stressful job, who can blame them? But that's just dumb and and either culpable or deceitful, I'd protest strongly, AND make it public. Cheers
  17. chrisg

    Dog food is good for you

    :) I'd not seen it before but assumed it was not original - after I got up from FOCPMSL that is :) Cheers
  18. chrisg

    Wither Peak Oil?

    :) I possibly know your aunt Girvo, Woodside are a major customer of mine. I suppose the price will eventually go down Director, but of course we have this annoying situation where our prices are linked to Singapore oil, which is very slow to decline after a price hike and of course they always use the excuse that the cheaper oil is not in the delivery system yet. Conveniently forgetting that they sold us lower price oil at a higher price when the price began to spike because that was not reflected by what was in the bowsers and storage either. :) Cheers
  19. No, but then I mostly work from home ;) Cheers
  20. chrisg

    Wither Peak Oil?

    Possibly, even probably, but electric cars are going to have to improve a good deal first. The current hybrids are all very well, but no more economically viable over the life of the car than expensive petrol. You pay more for the car, it has a shorter life, replacement batteries are hugely expensive and disposal at end-of-life is a nightmare compared to conventional vehicles. Petrol is something we need to stop using, oil is too valuable in other areas not least plastics and pharmaceuticals for us to just go on burning it. The industry, which has long objected to and probably suppressed alternative fuels is actually now investing in them. Cheers
  21. chrisg

    Wither Peak Oil?

    Depends Tinny, some of the geo guys I know take the Russian method seriously - they have to, the Russians are striking oil using their approach. No one argues that oil is finite, but the reality is that we have only explored a relatively small part of the globe and what we have exploited is not truly exhausted, it just becomes more difficult and thus more expensive to get it out - same with deep reserves. The industry is now looking at better methods in all three areas, exploration, extraction and deep drilling. The expectation in the industry is that there are huge deposits beneath both the Indian and Pacific oceans, we already know there is beneath the Atlantic. That's why a company called Technip manufactures a flexible submarine pipe - used to make it here in Perth, now main production is in Brazil. The idea is to drill from submarine rather than surface rigs (a la Abyss) and then hook the wells together using the pipe to common well heads that rise to tethered platforms. Tankers tie up to those platforms to take on oil. You'll see more and more of this on the northwest shelf in coming years. My friends tell me it is in no way SF, it is happening and it is overall no more expensive than rigs because the submarines will be far easier to move from drill site to drill site than a rig is and not cost much more in the outset than a big rig. This is why the industry is starting to recruit in the submariner community. We all know why oil companies keep prices high, but are careful not to push them out of reach - profits, pure and simple. I finished reading Twilight in the Dessert" on peak oil a while ago - discussed it with some friends in the know, who had also read it, they all say the same thing, it is essentially alarmist crap. A lot of the money being invested in the new methods is being funded out of Arabia, especially Saudi and Kuwait so they can go on profiting from oil even when their local reserves go low or methods of reviving the "exhausted" fields have not yet appeared. Cheers
  22. chrisg

    Wither Peak Oil?

    He's not the only one, every oil engineer I know holds similar views, some even more optimistic. Cheers
  23. chrisg

    Hey Chrisg... name the aircraft.

    :) Martin B-57 Frag, several different versions, including ELINT were, and some still are, operated by the USAF. Cheers
  24. chrisg

    Hey Chrisg... name the aircraft.

    :) The C-5s will be mostly aged out -A models, the wing box tended to fatigue on those and with the -B in production by then the -As were deemed too expensive to upgrade and were retired. The C-17s however are most probably just temporary visitors, surplus to requirements for now but likely to be recalled to service. Davis Monthan, or Mighty Masdic as it is often called, is an ideal location to store aircraft, low humidity, stable climate, lots of space. Not just military either, the airlines mothball airliners there in times of low demand - sometimes because of situation changes aircraft go straight into storage there from the production lines. If memory serves I think you will find that one of those F-111s is/was (depends when the picture was taken) the sole -B prototype, it has been there a long time, but Smithsonian want it for the new museum at Dulles. Cheers
  25. chrisg

    Hey Chrisg... name the aircraft.

    :-) Been there, interesting place. I doubt that is a Rafale, more likely a retired Agressor Kfir, they used them on Snake duty for quite a while. It's a movable feast at Davis-Monthan, they do try to hang on to the unique ones, and shuffle them off to museums, but the high production ones go to the crusher rather quickly when off the possible re-call roster - sad ..... Cheers
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