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@~thehung

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@~thehung last won the day on October 11

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About @~thehung

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  1. @~thehung

    Star Citizen / Squadrdon 42 - a real PC game

    - fwoar, the ATD with the 3rd/1st person parity thing blew my mind - i wonder if they could / will ever attempt to train NPC behaviour via machine learning of player behaviour? with a big enough player base that might become feasible on day. - i dont care about the MMO, just release Squadron 42 already! well, i do care, but the online experience would have to be near flawless and thoroughly bug free for me to even be bothered, which likely won't happen until a long time after release anyway. - if the SP game is moddable it could make a great canvas for playing around with A Slower Speed of Light, if only to make a far flashier educational tool out of it.
  2. @~thehung

    Your mug, my mug, or everyones bloody mug ?

    yeah, but then your previous comment about Pelosi makes this a bit of a pot and kettle situation -- FWIW @hulkster, your first reaction against washing it seemed in good humour "Its personal to me lol" so i wasnt expecting to hit a nerve by taking the piss. i was expecting maybe a "haha fuck you! :D". one option is disposable cups. or maybe something like this:
  3. @~thehung

    Your mug, my mug, or everyones bloody mug ?

    you didnt mention that it wasnt either. so its not unnatural to wonder if there would be level of clean that might do the trick, such as taking it home and scouring it with baking soda and submersing it in a pot of boiling water for ten minutes. but i guess not. i understand that a personal attachment to something isnt always completely rational, and doesnt have to be. the aforementioned method would be enough for me to eradicate the taint. but speaking of taints, i probably wouldnt wear someone elses underpants no matter how scientifically they were cleaned
  4. @~thehung

    Your mug, my mug, or everyones bloody mug ?

    and which part of sanitise/sterilise did you not read? when youre done, its still exactly the same cup minus the foreign matter and maybe a few atoms here or there. whats the issue with that? the thing i hate the most is when someone yoinks my empty mug from my desk, thinking i wanted it cleaned. no, i like to make coffee on top of coffee and let the festiness build. that way nobody ever has any illusions that the mug is communal.
  5. @~thehung

    Your mug, my mug, or everyones bloody mug ?

    btw, for as long as ive been drinking coffee on the regular, i have had "my special cup" that i dont want others using. but for even longer than that, ive known how to clean and sanitise/sterilise tableware. maybe having it blessed by a priest would help?
  6. @~thehung

    What's on your mind?

    the genuine news part is that a display is commencing at Vincennes Zoo. it was their press release that started the proliferation of stories, and now heaps of people are hearing about the craziness of this mould for the first time. that can only be a Good Thing™. i only barely knew of it from a RadioLab podcast from a while back.
  7. @~thehung

    Your mug, my mug, or everyones bloody mug ?

    when nasty people do mean things like calling us names, like poopyhead, or use our special cup without asking, that can really hurt sometimes :( isnt there a grown up around you can talk to?
  8. @~thehung

    What's on your mind?

    well, even supposing you attended a very advanced primary school, i am guessing at least some of the learnings from this millennium will be news to some of its alumni :) researchers demonstrated Physarum polycephalum can solve the shortest path problem in 2000. in 2008, they showed it can anticipate events via some kind of memory. in 2010, the mold created an efficient nutrient transport network between oatflakes placed to represent the positions of Tokyo train stations. all of this from an organism with no centralised brain or nervous system. its wild!
  9. @~thehung

    The truth is out there.

    quantum spin is another one. how many times have you seen an electron represented as a ball spinning on its axis? but they arent balls. and they dont spin. but they do have angular momentum. aaaaagghhh!!!!
  10. @~thehung

    The truth is out there.

    what's crazy is theres more than enough stars in the universe for there to be at least one in any possible direction you could point to. the reason the night sky is dark is because most of that light hasnt or never will reach us. btw, fuck the balloon analogy. i'm sorry, but its one of those things (like the ball on a blanket demonstration of gravity) that gets over used and really shits me. why? because it creates more confusion than it alleviates. the balloon gets across that everything is moving away from every other thing more or less uniformly. fine. its also a way of showing theres no centre point of the expansion as you might expect — so long as youre fine with treating the warped surface of the balloon as a 2D projection of the entirety of 3D space. yeah, good luck with that.
  11. @~thehung

    The truth is out there.

    yeah, i got that. and i am saying without knowing the maximum duration and minimum energetic cost of a single intelligent thought for all potential enacting mechanisms, even a safe assumption of the immutability of that law leaves us without much in the way of a workable sense of scale. you are assuming something "similar to ourselves" in that youre making unspoken assumptions about biological life. perfectly reasonable assumptions, too. like, for example, its reasonable to suppose that extreme G forces can kill anything. i am just taking an extreme "what if" angle, because thats the game we're playing in this thread, no? :) and, because we dont even understand how frogs manage to not die when most of their body water is frozen solid and theyre showing no classical signs of life...
  12. @~thehung

    What Did You Watch Lately ?

    happy to say i was very happy with it. seems to be a fair number of genuine BB fans who werent impressed, but maybe thats coz they were expecting the wrong thing? it doesnt really follow the narrative arc you would expect of a stand alone film. it hasnt been movie-ified. it feels more like a bonus 2.5 episodes. just a tidy and fitting epilogue for Jesse. and thats fine with me. written and directed by Vince Gilligan. nuff said. i highly recommend refreshing your mind on the events of the final season first: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breaking_Bad_(season_5)
  13. @~thehung

    The truth is out there.

    you guys are really having a semantic debate about over- and under-statement. it all depends on how you choose to frame things. you can say Newton wasnt wrong - just incomplete. you can also say he was dead wrong in that fundamental premises of his physics were later contradicted. you could say, Einstein broke the physics we already knew, or merely extended it. *sigh* both are valid characterisations. it was a monumental shift in understanding which ever way you cut it, mkay. likewise, you must allow for the possibility that something we learn from encountering new naturally occurring elements could lead to a comparable shift in our understanding.
  14. @~thehung

    The truth is out there.

    like chrisg suggested, when talking about alien life we cant make too many assumptions about "brains" and their timescales. we could think of a brain as any self-sustaining mechanism that executes sentience/intelligence in terms of processes of raw informational interchange, which could encompass non-DNA-based forms, for instance. also the lines between organisms and superorganisms may yet be blurry. as for timescales, here on earth, scientists estimate the "subterranean biosphere is teeming with between 15bn and 23bn tonnes of micro-organisms, hundreds of times the combined weight of every human on the planet.... ...One organism found 2.5km below the surface has been buried for millions of years and may not rely at all on energy from the sun. Instead, the methanogen has found a way to create methane in this low energy environment, which it may not use to reproduce or divide, but to replace or repair broken parts. Lloyd said: “The strangest thing for me is that some organisms can exist for millennia. They are metabolically active but in stasis, with less energy than we thought possible of supporting life.” Rick Colwell, a microbial ecologist at Oregon State University, said the timescales of subterranean life were completely different. Some microorganisms have been alive for thousands of years, barely moving except with shifts in the tectonic plates, earthquakes or eruptions. “We humans orientate towards relatively rapid processes – diurnal cycles based on the sun, or lunar cycles based on the moon – but these organisms are part of slow, persistent cycles on geological timescales.” https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/dec/10/tread-softly-because-you-tread-on-23bn-tonnes-of-micro-organisms
  15. @~thehung

    The truth is out there.

    this works as a response to the neutrino experiment AND i believe it concisely gets across the gist of what Cybes was originally getting at https://www.jimal-khalili.com/blog/Faster-than-the-speed-of-light
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