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Camsie

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About Camsie

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  1. TPG is a no-go for me, because apparently they don't do Fiber To The Curb, which I'm slated for. A quick glance over the iiNet page gives me the impression that their the same...
  2. The NBN's coming to my street soon and I'd like to get some idea who the best providers are - not so much in terms of bang for your buck (I can survey that landscape pretty well myself), but in terms of customer service quality. See, I realize that most of the faults with the NBN are NBNCo's responsibility, so in that regard, the choice of provider is somewhat arbitrary, seeing as how the hardware leading into my house is the same either way. But say I do have problems, which providers have the customer service depts. that are easiest to get along with and get results the fastest? Are there any companies I should avoid like the plague? Appreciate the community's thoughts on this one...
  3. My PC's developed an annoying little tic where it doesn't automatically assign a drive letter to USB drives (both HDD and flash) that I plug into it, forcing me to assign a letter manually via Computer Management. Problem doesn't seem to occur that much with drives that I plug in on a regular basis, but new drives and rarely-used drives don't get assigned a letter. Once I've manually assigned a letter, though, the drives all behave normally. Any idea how I can fix this? Windows 7 64-bit.
  4. Camsie

    Laptop Wifi Failure

    Sorry. Sort of abandoned this thread after I discovered the nature of the problem myself. Turns out it was the Wifi card. When I went in and did a BIOS-level hardware check, the computer had no idea that it had a Wifi card present. We since ordered a new PCI-e Mini card to replace it. Tried installing it yesterday - the computer refuses to boot with it installed. Can't even get into the BIOS screen. The message on the screen said something like "unrecognized Wifi Card" or maybe it was "incompatible" - I can't remember the exact wording. I'd think they should all adhere to the same PCI-e Mini standard, so I'm guessing that HP have rigged the laptop to only accept the cards they designate as acceptable. The Laptop is a HP G6-1325TU, the old (broken) Wifi Card is a Ralink RT5390 and the replacement we brought was an Intel 7260HMW. I realize this is a longshot, but does anyone know of a way of reconfiguring the laptop to accept the Intel card? I've checked the HP website and the BIOS for the machine is the most up-to-date version.
  5. Camsie

    Laptop Wifi Failure

    Well, System Restore to a time when the Wifi was definitely working was a bust. The network adapter is still invisible.
  6. Camsie

    Laptop Wifi Failure

    First thing we tried. The LED on the key is permanently glowing orange - indicating no WiFi network connection. Yeah, there's a "Show Hidden Devices" option there, but it won't show old/disconnected devices without being opened with the command line sequence I note above. Don't ask me why.
  7. My dad's laptop seems to have inexplicably lost it's wifi capability. It's like the Wifi network adapter doesn't even exist anymore. At first I just assumed that maybe the circuit fried or maybe just disconnected from the motherboard. But the thing that's really throwing me is that when I do a full check of device manager (i.e. "set devmgr_show_nonpresent_devices=1 start devmgmt.msc" in the command prompt), there is no record of the computer EVER having had a Wifi network adapter. I've had circuits fizzle in my computers before, but even when that happens, the computer still remembers that it used to have a working circuit inside it. In this case, the Wifi circuit seems to not only have died, but to have been completely erased from the computer's history. My dad reckons all this began with a recent update of his Norton's 360 security suite which required a reboot. I'm inclined to believe that may be the culprit - it wouldn't be the first time Nortons has caused us grief. However, I've done a full uninstall of Nortons and the problem still remains. I've tried reinstalling the network adapter drivers as supplied by HP, and I've also tried sfc /scannow, which turned up nothing. If this is a hardware fault, it's a bloody odd one, to have erased all trace of the working part from Windows' memory. Can anyone offer any insights as to what might be happening, what I might try next? The OS is Win 7 64-bit.
  8. So recently, I've developed a problem where, more often then not, when I wake my Win 7, 64-bit PC out of sleep (note: not hibernation, my desktop doesn't have this feature), the machine doesn't wake properly into it's pre-sleep state, but rather stalls for a second, then reboots. Obviously, it's crashing upon waking up, but the trouble is, I can't seem to get a clue as to what's causing it. I have software called "WhoCrashed", which is normally pretty good at sniffing out OS-crash causes, by examining the logs in C:Windows\Minidump and C:\Windows\memory.dmp except in these recent cases, whatever is causing the crash isn't leaving any logs behind. At least, none that I can find. There are also no recent entries in my general program crash dump folder. Any idea on how I can track what's going on?
  9. Seems like the right kind of tool, but it's a bit pricey. I know, shareware, but still, I don't like to waste my one and only use of a product if I can help it. I think I've got my problem sorted for now, so unless my solution goes kaput, I probably won't use this tool ATM, but I shall keep a note of it for future reference. Thanks for the suggestion! :D
  10. I'm looking for some kind of tool (i.e. software) that can tell you what information the computer is getting from whatever is plugged in to it's USB ports. Obviously working USB devices must broadcast some kind of basic "header" information to the computer when they are plugged in - otherwise the computer wouldn't recognize devices that are plugged in to it and know what kind of drivers it needs to load for them. I need a program that can give me a look at what information the devices are outputting. I'm *NOT* interested in a program that just echoes to me what the OS thinks is plugged in to the computer. e.g. If I have an iPod plugged in, but I've mistakenly assigned iPhone drivers to it, I want a program that will tell me "the thing in USB port 4 says it's an iPod", not "the thing in USB port 4 has been assigned the identity 'iPhone'". I want a tool that specifically focuses on the information coming from the USB port itself, not the driver registry. Ideally, it should be a program that will notify me if the information coming out of the USB device is corrupt, or invalid. It needs to be a program that can interrogate all manner of USB devices - not just with external drives/flash drives (programs for interrogating drives are easy to find, programs that interrogate USB devices in general, less so). I'm not interested in a tool geared towards testing the computer's own USB circuitry, as I don't believe my problem is with the computer itself. I'd also be interested if anyone can recommend any software designed to check USB connections for broken wires/bad pin connections. i.e. to check that all the electrical lines between the PC and the circuitry of the device are intact. Thanks. :)
  11. My understanding is that Wireless XBox 360 controllers can't be connected up to a PC (i.e. can't transmit their input) via a cable, they can only be used on PCs via wireless recievers? Is that correct? The USB cables I've seen around for wireless XBox 360 controllers are strictly for drawing power from the PC, if I understand correctly? Their mostly called "charging cables", but could I just use one to power a controller without batteries? Or do they litterally only funnel power into the batteries, without actually powering the circuitry of the controller itself?
  12. Camsie

    Connecting A GTX1070 To A VGA Monitor

    Thanks everyone. I managed to get up an running just a few days before Xmas with a $9.40 Displayport to VGA cable. Through my various enquiries I actually heard back from the people who actually invented and administer the Displayport system and they informed me that all Displayport to VGA adapters are infact "active" adapters. So it turns out all the confusion I had about that market was all for naught, as there's only really the one type! :p
  13. Camsie

    Connecting A GTX1070 To A VGA Monitor

    Just looked it up. My monitor has the HD-15 type. But all the adapters on the market still call it a VGA plug. Does this mean that there's a chance I could buy something with a VGA output and still wind up with problems because I've got myself a DE-15 outputter instead of the HD-15 outputter I actually need? Wonderful.
  14. Camsie

    Connecting A GTX1070 To A VGA Monitor

    Okay, but I obviously don't have USB ports on my graphics card, so essentially, the picture data has to come back out of the card via the PCI Express slot, through the motherboard and then out the USB sockets. That actually works? I've never had an arrangement where the picture data doesn't come directly from the graphics card, so this is all new to me.
  15. Camsie

    Connecting A GTX1070 To A VGA Monitor

    Damn, this is getting more and more confusing by the second. Everything I've read up til now has suggested to me that a passive Displayport converter won't work for me, but now you are telling me that it will. But also, you keep talking about DB15 ports. I've just looked it up and it looks like a DB15 port is the kind of monitor port I used to have on my old Advance 86. (Ah, for the days when 640KB of RAM was considdered high-end...) What my monitor has is a VGA port. It has the same trapezoid-type shape, but it has 3 rows of pins, not 2. It's a completely different plug, so I really need to make sure what I get is VGA-outputting, not DB15 outputting.
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