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ShiroKage

It said 1.85:1 aspect ratio...

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This seems like a good as place as any for this thread...

 

I got the film Sister Act from the library. Yes okay stop laughing, I liked it as a kid. It says on the cover it is in 1.85:1 aspect ratio.

 

I boot it up on the computer (using a 22" screen) and it is dodgey... Hard for me to explain, but it is essentially in 4:3 "TV" ratio, but with additional borders on the top and bottom of that to maintain the 1.85:1 ratio. In other words, it is a small little picture surrounded by black borders on the top, bottom, left and right! They can't do that?! What the heck.

 

Is this just bad luck? Is there a way to zoom in or something and actually make it the 1.85:1 ratio I'm used to (i.e. take up most of my 22" screen)?

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Try the crop options in VLC.

Edited by cmos

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ah sweet, that did the trick.

 

i tried it out on the xbox360/tv combo and it look like it automatically cropped it, no problems there.

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Oh, it's one of those dodgy deals where the video itself is tallscreen, but there's an embedded widescreen video in it? I hate those.

 

Yeah, the crop options are what you want.

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Given it's an English language thing, you've not experienced the absolute evil that is possible with encoding widescreen within a 4:3 format.

 

When the DVD mastering process moves the subtitles into the bottom blank area, so that any attempt to zoom/crop the aspect ratio by a TV (so that you fill your nice large ws TV with a ws movie) results in loosing the translation text :(

 

Movies where you don't understand what the German/Russian sub captain is yelling is perhaps a little too authentic for me....

Edited by stadl

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Maybe it's non-anamorphic 1:85:1 ?

 

Your TV may have a Zoom function which stretched the image to cover the whole screen.

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