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Digital Distribution - Dealing in Denial

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Always a controversial topic.

 

I am pro-steam, but I'll be the first to admit it can be a pain in the arse.

 

Things I like about Steam:

-Cheaper, and sometimes really cheap, games. (So for those who like to on-sell their games, I dare say the amount you save on the inital purchase would at least half make up for the fact you can't on sell said game?)

-Convenient. Auto Updates. Integrated friends network.

-It's by Valve. And I love Valve. Of my top 5 favourite games ever, four, maybe all five of them are made by Valve (TF2, L4D, HL2Ep2, portal, and the fifth probably being UT series (they're all great) or maybe psychonauts or something. *shrugs*)

-I love the business strategies and attitudes behind Valve/Steam. Gabe Newell knows his shit. Especially in regards to intrusive DRM, pirating, how to make a good game, etc.

-Region-free game releases are encouraged (ie, released everywhere at the same time. There are some exceptions, but for the most part it's released everywhere within two days)

-Generally easy to crack for a pain-free offline experience.

-Support. I've had a few issues (which all ended up being caused by me fiddling way too much, and being fixed when I realised what I had done previously), and the response has always been relatively quick, and not too stupid.

 

Things I dislike and/or hate about Steam:

-Offline mode. I think I've got it working perfectly now, but offline mode has had no end of troubles in the past. One LAN about a year ago, out of the 12 or so wanting to play TF2 (steam only game), only one guy could get offline mode to work. Another LAN I forgot to set to offline mode before I left, and as you could guess it wouldn't work. I went so far as to grab my PC, monitor and UPS, and go cruising aroudn town to try and find an open access point to sign on to steam with. No luck. Ended up going home to do it.

-Games can sometimes take a while to open. Most of the time TF2 will take 20 seconds before it will launch the game itself (auth'ing with the steam servers or something, I guess?). I'm often doing other things pre-game, so it doesn't impact me much.

-Not being on an ISP with free content servers

-The bandwidth meter normally showing about half of what was actually downloaded.

 

As a LAN admin, steam sucks. Making comps using steam games generally annoying (but I am noticing a slow improvement in their reliability. I still have resort to steam cracks most LANs though, 'cos I forget to go to offline mode before leaving).

 

Regardless of all, I do quite love steam, even though it's no where near perfect.

 

(nb: I wrote this post quite a few hours ago, then forgot to click post)

 

Most ISPs have a free-downloads section and if they allowed Steam or any other digital distribution platform in to be free-download that would be fantastic.

Internode, Westnet, iiNet, Telstra and I think a few others all have steam content servers that do not count towards your download limit.

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Maybe you should find a new hobby if you cant afford your current one. Or find a different way to get your games, but for most people with full time jobs, its not hard to afford, unless you make commitments that you shouldnt.

i can easily afford to buy the games, my argument is with the comment that people who refuse to throw money at their computers to solve problems are tightarses.

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Maybe you should find a new hobby if you cant afford your current one. Or find a different way to get your games, but for most people with full time jobs, its not hard to afford, unless you make commitments that you shouldnt.

i can easily afford to buy the games, my argument is with the comment that people who refuse to throw money at their computers to solve problems are tightarses.

 

Would this be a bad time to point out that you can buy a 500GB HD from UMart for $92... *less* than a new release game?

 

Seriously. Of all the components in your computer that suck up the money, hard drives are the *least* expensive.

 

CPU - More expensive.

Memory - More expensive

Video Card - Crazy expensive

Monitor - More Expensive.

Motherboard - More expensive

Soundcard - More expensive...

 

If you can easily afford games, you can easily afford additional hard drive space. It's fine if you want to argue on principles... but cost really isn't a great platform for the argument.

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From reading this thread, what it seems to come down to is that Steam is not going to be a solution or the solution for everyone, in all situations. And that's ok. There's very few things in life that are truly one-size-fits-all :-)

 

I agree with Khirareq when he says it's about choices. That's what I appreciate about things like Steam and Good Old Games (nice to see that get a mention in the latest Atomic) - choice. I personally haven't used Steam myself because it hasn't met my requirements yet, but that doesn't mean I think the platform itself is wrong. Far from it, in fact - I think the innovation is important, and as a consumer I appreciate having choices.

 

Whilst I do recognise the importance of the platform, and I'm sure it's quite a robust system, I'm not going to absolve it from all sins *just because it's Steam*. That's incredibly myopic and stifles innovation. We've seen here in this thread that Steam does not meet the requirements of some - and that's ok, because it's not a one-size-fits-bloody-all solution.

 

Just as purchasing tangible products is a better fit for some right now, so to are others more comfortable with or happier to use digital distribution models. Both models have their advantages and disadvantages. Sure, there may come a time when bricks-and-mortar distribution channels are gone entirely, to be replaced with digital distribution models. But when that happens, hopefully we will still have choices of providers and platforms :-)

 

I agree with and support the principle of digital distribution models, and I agree to an extent that they are, in fact, the way of the future :-) I'm happy with that. At the moment, though, I'm just happy to have the choice :-) I think that's important.

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There are two choices at the moment, Steam, and Games for Windows Live, some games are available on both, one platform may suit some more than the other.

 

Who knows how far the Microsoft platform will go, they've had a lot of dodgy internet ventures in the past. It works for Xbox, will it work for PC? Microsoft Points really suck though, it's much less friendly than even the $US prices that Steam charge us in.

 

Maybe one day there will be a more open and free system than what we have at the moment, but it all depends on the games publishers and what platforms they choose to support.

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There are two choices at the moment, Steam, and Games for Windows Live, some games are available on both, one platform may suit some more than the other.

 

Who knows how far the Microsoft platform will go, they've had a lot of dodgy internet ventures in the past. It works for Xbox, will it work for PC? Microsoft Points really suck though, it's much less friendly than even the $US prices that Steam charge us in.

 

Maybe one day there will be a more open and free system than what we have at the moment, but it all depends on the games publishers and what platforms they choose to support.

Agree completely.

 

The issue with having multiple Digital Distribution channels becomes the client software.

 

The *last* think I want to see is people having to install a dozen different clients just so they can play games from different publishers.

 

Ideally, we'd see some kind of open standard DRM/Packaging platform that would exist independently from the platforms distributing them.

 

Much like we have in stores now. EB and JB-HiFi don't each require their products to be in "special" boxes that only they can sell.

 

I doubt such an open standard will ever be allowed to come into being... but one can always hope.

Edited by neowulf

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Then your mind wanders to the possibility of a digital marketplace, where digital media of all types could be bought and sold by anyone... (well, by copyright holders at least) and license trading was allowed, even if they whacked on a small fee on for the original copyright holder.

 

oh, dreamland.

 

imagine if you will, the case of Bigpond Movies.

 

What if, you paid 50% - 75% of the cost of a DVD for digital movies, in the same way Steam (And probably iTunes) operates. They would stay on your account perpetually, allowing you to download them and view them on any device.

 

Bigpond Movies on the other hand is just a form of digital movie rental. Just as I never rent DVDs any more, I prefer to buy them (even second hand) to watch at my convenience. If I could "buy" a digital "DVD" that I could watch whenever I wanted, I would be so much happier. I have a feeling iTunes and maybe XBox Live may already offer this, but I don't have a device capable of using either service.

 

Steam already has a "My Media" tab, what if they were to offer a full-blown movie sales portal to their portfolio, People have got used to purchasing media that way, surely music and movies are not far off. The problem is with the old knobs who head these industries are afraid they will lose profits, but if it makes their product more accessible, I can only see more profits.

Edited by smadge1

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Then your mind wanders to the possibility of a digital marketplace, where digital media of all types could be bought and sold by anyone... (well, by copyright holders at least) and license trading was allowed, even if they whacked on a small fee on for the original copyright holder.

 

oh, dreamland.

 

imagine if you will, the case of Bigpond Movies.

 

What if, you paid 50% - 75% of the cost of a DVD for digital movies, in the same way Steam (And probably iTunes) operates. They would stay on your account perpetually, allowing you to download them and view them on any device.

 

Bigpond Movies on the other hand is just a form of digital movie rental. Just as I never rent DVDs any more, I prefer to buy them (even second hand) to watch at my convenience. If I could "buy" a digital "DVD" that I could watch whenever I wanted, I would be so much happier. I have a feeling iTunes and maybe XBox Live may already offer this, but I don't have a device capable of using either service.

 

Steam already has a "My Media" tab, what if they were to offer a full-blown movie sales portal to their portfolio, People have got used to purchasing media that way, surely music and movies are not far off. The problem is with the old knobs who head these industries are afraid they will lose profits, but if it makes their product more accessible, I can only see more profits.

You know, given time I suspect that's a pretty good representation of the system we'll end up with.

 

Dispite what companies think, it's the consummers who make the rules in the end. If the consumers decide "I want to download my movies..." then business will have to figure it out.

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You know, given time I suspect that's a pretty good representation of the system we'll end up with.

 

Dispite what companies think, it's the consummers who make the rules in the end. If the consumers decide "I want to download my movies..." then business will have to figure it out.

Yep, it's simple supply and demand.

If there is demand for something, but no supply, however 'illicit' procurement is simple, safe, and easy, then it will happen.

 

It's like prohibition of alcohol. Alcohol is easy and cheap to make, with a little knowledge.

 

As for electronic distribution, I think Steam is fantastic.

 

I love the fact I can reload my games if the disks get scratched.

That I don't have to keep the disks around, and fish them out.

I love the fact that games get updated automatically.

 

My brother was away for four months. He's trying to find his CoH disks so we can play. On the flip side, I used the steam backup to chuck left4dead onto his machine, and he purchased that, and we got straight into it.

 

Sure, if you get capped it sucks.

Sure, it's annoying if it auto-updates something and pushes you over, and you get locked out of the game. On the flipside, you never get those version mismatch errors you got in games when you try to join a new version hosted.

 

As pointed out, steam is unmetered on many ISPs.

 

Combined with the cheap price, based on $US for most titles (at least for me), and it's a total winner!

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IMO the argument stands like this: good internet is cheap which makes it easy to download the games and Hard drives are getting cheaper for desktops and laptops, so if you are going to use things like that as an excuse to hate steam then thats your fault for being a tightass.

so says mr privileged, who clearly doesn't subside on a paycheck of about $100 a week on average, and clearly lives in a location where the internet works properly.

 

lots of us live in places where the internet doesnt work properly, and lots of us live on very small paychecks. we arnt tightarses, we just dont have the options available to you.

 

If the money you're earning isn't enough, go out and earn more or figure out a way to utilise your money better.

If the internet in your area is lacking, move.

 

this is a monumentally weak and arrogant argument. same goes to the sanctimony from nesquick, neowulf and other Steam apologists arguing that all inconveniences should be slavishly accepted and paid for by consumers. thats like defending a shop that sells exclusive but stained clothes -- because if you cant afford the dry-cleaning to fix their faulty product, its somehow your fault, and you should buy something else then....you lazy peasant. by all means argue that the pros outweigh the cons, but this bullshit borders on religious fervour.

 

its not about your job, your internet plan and the biggest hard drive you can afford.

 

i can afford to travel to developing countries for months at a time. i can also afford bigger and bigger storage, although there is never enough space. so call me crazy, but i prefer the convenience of carrying all my games [especially those i merely want the unlikely option to play] and episodes of Saddle Club as hard copies. discs that work perfectly after re-installing my OS, if needs be -- without access to anything other than woeful and intermittent dial-up or none at all -- which has happened, and can happen for oh so many reasons. and i would feel pretty retarded if i'd taken the Steam route in procuring those games. but then i'd also feel pretty retarded if my account was hacked. or even if i was sitting at home one night during a black out and i couldnt get permission from Gheybe Newell to play a game that i'd forgotten to put into buggy-as-fuck offline mode.

 

its fine when Steam is just an option but when its enforced its just an unasked for, unwanted, unneeded, third-party pain in the arse. oh but wait, my bad; getting to play ETW isnt a right. its a privilege that previous fans could enjoy even with bad internet. now i guess some of them should just get real, and quit their job and move their whole family elsewhere to enjoy that privilege. yeah, Steam is sooo fricken cool it hurts.

 

 

 

My "you are wrong" comment is actually in reply to the statement about me going along with the ridiculous idea of DVD's needing authentication.

 

I like Steam because it gives me access to awesome games with relative ease.

If you don't like it. Fine.

 

There is no need to harp on and labelling people cock suckers and what not (although I did enjoy this response).

 

 

But, it is the internet after all.

i made no comment specifically about YOU going along with the hypothetical scenario of DVD authentication, nor did i call anyone here a cock sucker. re-read if necessary.

 

Steam is a wolf in sheeps clothing. you think the DVD scenario is ridiculous. it could happen, but whether or not its tomorrow or in five years is immaterial. i dont know how you can call online authentication of DVDs a ridiculous idea when apparently you dont think its ridiculous that your computer needs to phone home to another company so you can play a single player game, and communicate who-knows-what while its at it. that truly blows my mind.

 

@ANYONE: who here would pay, if your new BluRays required a nominal $5 per annum fee to remain authenticated?

 

again, try to follow the gist of the idea rather than its immediate plausibility. most of you would rebel. hard. but then you would watch in horror as more and more impatient and unthinking people bought these fancy new Broken-BluRay™ titles. of course the update would come with Cool-Stuff™ like film-specific games and cast interviews etc (including membership of the hip new club the Broken-BluRay™ Brigade lol) -- so retards buyers could feel vindicated for buckling to mendacious corporate shenanigans. all that, for only $5! and the forum posts would follow: if you cant afford the minor inconvenience, stick to B&W on your cathode ray tube and forget about High Def old timer.

 

Steam should be renamed Control Freak. whilst it has many positives, especially for small independent developers -- the cons far outweigh the pros, particularly when the "choice" to use it is no choice at all.

 

personally i prefer 2D Boys' approach to DRM:

http://arstechnica.com/gaming/news/2008/10...eal-from-us.ars

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IMO the argument stands like this: good internet is cheap which makes it easy to download the games and Hard drives are getting cheaper for desktops and laptops, so if you are going to use things like that as an excuse to hate steam then thats your fault for being a tightass.

so says mr privileged, who clearly doesn't subside on a paycheck of about $100 a week on average, and clearly lives in a location where the internet works properly.

 

lots of us live in places where the internet doesnt work properly, and lots of us live on very small paychecks. we arnt tightarses, we just dont have the options available to you.

 

If the money you're earning isn't enough, go out and earn more or figure out a way to utilise your money better.

If the internet in your area is lacking, move.

 

this is a monumentally weak and arrogant argument. same goes to the sanctimony from nesquick, neowulf and other Steam apologists arguing that all inconveniences should be slavishly accepted and paid for by consumers. thats like defending a shop that sells exclusive but stained clothes -- because if you cant afford the dry-cleaning to fix their faulty product, its somehow your fault, and you should buy something else then....you lazy peasant. by all means argue that the pros outweigh the cons, but this bullshit borders on religious fervour.

 

I also feel the argument of I need to carry around discs so I don't have to download them cause steam is shit is monumentally weak, as many have pointed out all you have to do is download it once or get the backup from a friend and you can then go and burn the files to a DVD or CD and problem solved, steam itself is only a few MB to download and if you have it on your laptop all good to go then you don't need a flash internet connection to re download your games as they are all on the discs you painfully had to bring with you.

 

each to their own though, if you don't like it don't use it, its not like you have to go around bitching about it when so many others think its great.

Edited by nesquick

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*shrug*

 

I suppose this is the way it is with all change.

 

"But we've got candles... What do you *mean* I have to pay someone to run wires to my house! I can *make* my own candles? And candles are so much cheaper than light bulbs. I can bring them with me anywhere! Stupid electric light..."

 

 

"What the hell? A Car? What do I need a car for? My horse can run a whole *day* with an occasional stop for food and water. Can a car do that? The things cost a fortune, are as noisey as hell, need *fuel* to run. Damn things break down all the time. Stupid cars. I'll keep my horse thank you very much..."

 

"Why would anyone need more than 640k of RAM?"

 

The world changes. Change is seldom welcomed.

 

Those of us "defending" steam are simply looking for the opportunities that come with that change.

 

I don't recall saying Digital Distribution is perfect. It's not. Perhaps it will cost us somethings. Most change does.

 

But it *is* the way of the future, just like the telephone, the automobile and the internet.

 

I'm OK with that.

 

If enough people take issue with it, then I'm sure there will remain a market for "discs", munch in the same way there is still a market for vinyl records.

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edit: bugger it. if you really believe that i should quit my job and fail at uni, as well as move house so i can use steam, rather then take the more practical option of CD's, you are a twit.

Edited by Sir_Substance

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IMO the argument stands like this: good internet is cheap which makes it easy to download the games and Hard drives are getting cheaper for desktops and laptops, so if you are going to use things like that as an excuse to hate steam then thats your fault for being a tightass.

so says mr privileged, who clearly doesn't subside on a paycheck of about $100 a week on average, and clearly lives in a location where the internet works properly.

 

lots of us live in places where the internet doesnt work properly, and lots of us live on very small paychecks. we arnt tightarses, we just dont have the options available to you.

How does your internet not work properly?

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IMO the argument stands like this: good internet is cheap which makes it easy to download the games and Hard drives are getting cheaper for desktops and laptops, so if you are going to use things like that as an excuse to hate steam then thats your fault for being a tightass.

so says mr privileged, who clearly doesn't subside on a paycheck of about $100 a week on average, and clearly lives in a location where the internet works properly.

 

lots of us live in places where the internet doesnt work properly, and lots of us live on very small paychecks. we arnt tightarses, we just dont have the options available to you.

How does your internet not work properly?

 

we are excessively far from the exchange. we can only barely get ADSL, via a large number of boosters. often it will take 60 clicks of a hyperlink (thats 3 clicks per second for 20 seconds) before a link will "catch" and take me to the page, during peak usage times. and by peak, i dont mean internodes peak time, but when it actually spikes, like late at night when everyone between me and the exchange turns on their torrents overnight. the speed is fine, but steam doesnt do re-trying connections very well. i ahve to keep canceling the download and restarting it, and it takes a few seconds for steam to start displaying the download speed so i know its working. it makes the process of initializing a download or update very slow.

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edit: bugger it. if you really believe that i should quit my job and fail at uni, as well as move house so i can use steam, rather then take the more practical option of CD's, you are a twit.

If you'd like to point out where I indicated that you should do any of the above things, I'd love to see it.

 

I'd also like to point out that taking a single external hard drive with over 50 ISO images on it is *far* more practical than lugging a CD wallet around with me...

 

You're still thinking "now". Now "steam is not perfect". Now "Steam has limitation that can be worked around *if* you're willing". Now "High Speed internet access is still limited in places". I'm willing to admit Steam isn't perfect. Where is the admission that it actually has some excellent features that others might actually value?

 

I'm not thinking "now". I'm thinking 5, 10, 20 years from now.

 

I'm saying that in 20 years from now, everyone (you included) will have access to this kind of internet.. just like you have access to power, water and electricity.

 

I'm saying internet *will* become just like every other utility we have. Society (Well, 1st World Western Society anyway...) will simply refuse to except anything less.

 

When that kind of infrastructure becomes available, digital distribution will finally come into it's own.

 

It's already happening in the states. They have fibre optic links to the door now. With that kind of bandwidth at your finger tips, why would you waste the petrol driving to the store...

Edited by neowulf

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I remember when steam first came out, it was slow, it crashed alot, it took a long time to do anything and generally it caused more problems than it solved. I didn't like it then but I could see the potential even if the immediate reality was annoying as all hell just like Games for WIndows is right now. Over the years Steam has matured into something more reliable and effective which lifted my opinion of steam from annoyed to indifferent. \

 

It has brought many advantages to users like lifting the audience and ability to market indie games on a recognisable platform, a platform which allows the ability to aquire games without having to leave the home for hopefully less than retail market value, a platform which organised and updates games with reasonable ability, a platform which allows all games to be backed up and transported then used at a different location and a platorm which has some of the least obstrusive DRM.

 

Of course with the pros comes cons such as the fact that the below market value of games isn't the 50% drop people were expecting because of publisher views on online content, it requires consistent internet connection in order to authenticate to both install and play games with offline mode is buggy at best, it isn't as customisable as it may be wanted such as destination locations for files and other such greivances.

 

Personally I stand with others on this issue. I want to be able to install my games without authenticating to servers which I may not have access to because servers no matter how redundant have to go down sometime and it is the matter that I don't trust that the servers will be there when I need them. It may not be a problem now but what about in 10 years, 20 years when I want to play my copy of Half-Life but the game is no longer supported on the server or the zombie apocalypse happens and all the servers are down permanently how the hell do I play my game then? (yes I have priority issues). I see the benefits of Steam as a universal platform to aquire games and maintain them effectively but in Australia as a technologically backward first world nation we have a unique perspective of what we consider reliable. Internet services, coverage and speed have improved but they are not to the levels that other countries consider the norm and hence more and fairly justified resistance to the idea of a solely online medium.

 

For me it boils down to the fact I don't want to be part of the cloud I want to be able to do things on my own and connect to the cloud when I want to not because I have to but things are moving slowly towards that idea. Digital distibution is a reality and one that will become more and more encompassing as things improve and perhaps Steam can address my issues and I can move from indifferent to satisfied.

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It may not be a problem now but what about in 10 years, 20 years when I want to play my copy of Half-Life but the game is no longer supported on the server

Hopefully a patch or mod to the game would be made available so it does not need online Authentication to run. Even non-steam games like BF2 will need this if people still want to play it online and they shut down the auth servers.

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It may not be a problem now but what about in 10 years, 20 years when I want to play my copy of Half-Life but the game is no longer supported on the server

Hopefully a patch or mod to the game would be made available so it does not need online Authentication to run. Even non-steam games like BF2 will need this if people still want to play it online and they shut down the auth servers.

 

hey that sounds more like a crack, but what the hay

 

I'm a steam fan boi however I remember trying to install HL2 cd's at 11pm with steam on dial up. And that was a 2am give up on it job. Next day it worked I think.

 

Now Steam is great when it works, awful when it wont. I am getting more crashes and updating loop bs with it recently (ok with vista and nod32) than every before. It used to quite stable.

 

right now steam is getting stuck on checking for steam updates and 'no responding'. I hate having to crack open my box of steam 'repair' tricks, which are useless if the servers and not the client is the problem.

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It may not be a problem now but what about in 10 years, 20 years when I want to play my copy of Half-Life but the game is no longer supported on the server

Hopefully a patch or mod to the game would be made available so it does not need online Authentication to run. Even non-steam games like BF2 will need this if people still want to play it online and they shut down the auth servers.

 

Hopefully indeed. It does address multiplayer issues to a degree but what about single player games that require online authentication? Are they going to cover them all? I can recall a very recent dance with Bioshock trying to get it to authenticate online. Unless I see a written guarantee I won't be satisfied with the intent to make games available without authentication. The simple fact is that computers can work without the internet so internet while highly essential isn't as essential as power or water so it is expected for them to be able to operate on their own and not have to connect to a cloud to be useful. Personally I still don't see the need for authentication at all but then I stand on the far left of the IP debate.

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It may not be a problem now but what about in 10 years, 20 years when I want to play my copy of Half-Life but the game is no longer supported on the server

Hopefully a patch or mod to the game would be made available so it does not need online Authentication to run. Even non-steam games like BF2 will need this if people still want to play it online and they shut down the auth servers.

 

Hopefully indeed. It does address multiplayer issues to a degree but what about single player games that require online authentication? Are they going to cover them all? I can recall a very recent dance with Bioshock trying to get it to authenticate online. Unless I see a written guarantee I won't be satisfied with the intent to make games available without authentication. The simple fact is that computers can work without the internet so internet while highly essential isn't as essential as power or water so it is expected for them to be able to operate on their own and not have to connect to a cloud to be useful. Personally I still don't see the need for authentication at all but then I stand on the far left of the IP debate.

 

I suspect that as games fall out of vogue, Valve may just "turn off" authentication for the particular title. It would make sense for them to help prune back old titles out of their software library.

 

Understand that for the most part, developers don't *care* really what happens to their game 10 years after launch. If they've made money out of it, that's all they really care about.

 

The guys at Valve would happily say "Well, last we checked, RION has had a valid copy of game X for the past 10 years... So we're fairly confident he actually owns it. No need to authenticate".

 

The guys at Valve aren't idiots. They *want* online distribution to succeed and to do that, they know they have to be responsive to what the customers want.

 

Offline mode will improve as time goes on and Valve have stated on numerous occasions that should they ever go under, they will release the source code for Steam onto the internet, enabling people to disable authentication.

 

With the move towards local ISP's mirroring steam content, the likely hood that you'll be completely locked out of your games is slim. But hey, as you say, each to their own.

 

Personally, I love the idea of the cloud. That my data is always within reach, no matter where i am and what I'm doing. With portable hard drives getting ever cheaper (and larger), it's a non-event for me to backup my entire game library from steam and carry it around with me.

 

I could even *burn* it to disk if that was more suitable :P

 

The technology will get there. I for one can't wait to see what it holds in store for us :)

 

Now... if only Steam would introduce a world class game matching service... then we'd *really* be in business :P

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So, what's the problem you've all had with Offline mode?

 

My net goes down, I restart it in offline mode, and all is sweet from what I've seen.

 

*shrugs

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In the end for me and for oothers I imagine it is a matter of control. I cannot control the cloud, I cannot control steam. I can control a local copy of a game and in that regards for most people like this online authentication, distribution and the cloud in general is a step backward. I want to control my data not have it on a server somewhere that could go down or be inacessible. THe same reasoning applies to a PC of course being it is a single point of failure but a cloud is a multiple point of failure so far the net and onbline distribution in general has shown itself more failure prone. THis will improve with time but still the aspect of control remains.

 

I don't have problems with the cloud per say just my own perceptions of it don't co-incide. If the copy was entirely local and didn't need constant authentication so it could be truly transferd and played anywhere I wouldn't have a problem at all but this isn't the case. I want to control my data but right now Steam won't let me so I don't rely on it if I don't have to but that doesn't mean Steam is bad either.

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In the end for me and for oothers I imagine it is a matter of control. I cannot control the cloud, I cannot control steam. I can control a local copy of a game and in that regards for most people like this online authentication, distribution and the cloud in general is a step backward. I want to control my data not have it on a server somewhere that could go down or be inacessible. THe same reasoning applies to a PC of course being it is a single point of failure but a cloud is a multiple point of failure so far the net and onbline distribution in general has shown itself more failure prone. THis will improve with time but still the aspect of control remains.

 

I don't have problems with the cloud per say just my own perceptions of it don't co-incide. If the copy was entirely local and didn't need constant authentication so it could be truly transferd and played anywhere I wouldn't have a problem at all but this isn't the case. I want to control my data but right now Steam won't let me so I don't rely on it if I don't have to but that doesn't mean Steam is bad either.

Interesting point of view their Rion. I never really thought about it.

It's probably the same reason people feel frightened sitting in a car next to a driver going at 300kph, yet might feel quite at ease if they were the ones behind the wheel.

 

The idea behind the cloud means it's *more* fault resistant than a single point of access.

 

Consider this. I upload my resume and all my photo's to the cloud.

 

My PC blows up. No worries, go to the local library and access it online.

My house burns down. Still ok.

My internet goes down. That's ok, go over a friends, or work, or some cheap internet cafe and access it.

My hard drive crashes. Nope, still ok. Just re-download everything from the cloud.

A single node in the cloud fails. That's ok, there's *dozens* more in the cluster, to ensure continuing uptime.

 

Corporate enterprise can afford to throw crazy crazy money at redundancy and fail over. Far more than a private citizen can. Although, again I believe it's a case of perception.

 

I assume Rion you get paid via direct deposit rather than cash yes? You can't even *request* to have your pay given in cash anymore. The banks handle it. The banks have complete control of our money.

If you lose your pin, or they freeze your account, or the ATM network goes offline... guess what. No access to your money.

 

Yet, it's the world we live in. We gave up some of that direct control in favor of convenience. It's a similar thing that's occurring with platforms like Steam.

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I see your point and you can see mine. The thing is that gamers of the current generation experienced complete control and now control is being taken away. For the next generation it will be in place hence no problem, for those who get paid through banks that was done ebfore our time so its accepted as normal so we go down this continual road of losing direct control to have convience replaced by it. That doesn't make it bed per say. It does however conflict with people's idea of control, no matter how well it works we can no longer control it and that for some of us can be a maddening thought no matter what benefits it brings. That is the mentality I imagine one needs to fight in the most staunch anti-steam people.

 

I sit somewhere between heaven and hell, I can see the benefits and experience them but another part of me is telling me they are coming at a cost and I don't like it. Therefore I say why does it need to be either/or why can't it be both?

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