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just_some_guy

Broadband: should I go cable, or naked DSL?

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Hahaha good call.

 

The shoe's on the other foot when it's something you live and breathe.

Indeed. And the internet never forgets. :P

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Hahaha good call.

 

The shoe's on the other foot when it's something you live and breathe.

Indeed. And the internet never forgets. :P

 

I deserved that.

 

I fully regret that Techno stuff, I was having a really bad few days, and was feeling argumentative.

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http://www.google.com/search?q=7GB+cable+modem

 

7GB refers to the data allowance of the plan. Not the modem. lrn2read.

Once again you link to Australian terminology, when I already stated clearly that USA measures bandwidth differently and it was a USA modem. I'm not sure what they're using now, but in those days cable modems were rated according to speed. It had nothing to do with the plan and wasn't purchased from an ISP.

 

Sure, the hardware has speed ratings and limitations. Doesn't stop the fact that "7GB" is not a speed.

 

Well no, it's not "JUST" hype. They are actually separate standards. But I guess for the consumer, there's no real reason to differentiate.

No, it's hype, and in this case the standards are hype as well. ADSL2+ is nothing more than ADSL with higher frequency spectra. ADSL2+ modems are backwards compatible with ADSL. Same exact technology.

 

You're correct, there is no reason to differentiate by name. All the end user cares about is speed. It's much simpler to understand a 1.5mb/s, 3.0mb/s, or 30mb/s connection than ADSL, ADSL2, ADSL2+, or ADSL2+ Extreme.

 

As SS says, they are different standards... but I agree listing their speeds rather than using all the ADSL/ADSL2/ADSL2+ crap, would be much better. But I guess they can't do that, due to your achievable speed differing based on the distance you are the exchange, and the quality of your last mile copper line.

 

Just an incorrect usage of the term "limit" on your part then. To say that something is "limited" infers that is all they're capable of, regardless of the reason. If you'd said they were limited by the ISP, your post would have read as you now say that you intended. They are apparently throttled down in Australia since I've never gotten anything above the advertised speed on ADSL or ADSL2+. DSL was never throttled down in the USA. The plan guaranteed a minimum speed, but they often reached much higher than advertised.

Yeah, that's fucken annoying...

Bloody tight-arses here.

 

Anything else?

 

Edit: The main point here is that you're confusing technologies with products. DSL is a physical mechanism, it uses free bandwidth in copper cables to communicate between a DSL modem, and a DSLAM. When you use fibre optic cabling to connect the customer equipment to the exchange, it's no longer DSL. It's technically not even a broadband connection, it's baseband (100BaseFX or 1000BaseFX). What it IS, is a fast Internet connection.

 

Edit2: For clarity: Fibre optics ARE used in the delivery of DSL connections (e.g. from HQ to the exchange, or from the exchange to a local RIM) but not for the last mile.

I haven't confused anything. If anyone has, you have. In one breath you say DSL can't be used on copper, and in the next breath you say it can, but not from the exchange. Obviously digital can be used on both copper and fiber, but it needs to be converted at some point for your computer. ISP's have chosen to do this in AU at the exchange for now.

 

From what I can tell he's been talking about the last mile all along, and in that 2nd edit, which you've quoted, he makes that clear.

I was also under the impression that that part can only be over copper, and reading through the Wiki article, it seems to pretty well back that up.

 

Do you have references to back up your assertion that the term DSL can refer to consumer internet access that doesn't use twisted pair at all, darklife41?

 

 

-A-

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It's about a 1.5km drive from my place to the exchange and I get about 16/1. There are things you can do to increase speed like get a central splitter installed.

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It's about a 1.5km drive from my place to the exchange and I get about 16/1. There are things you can do to increase speed like get a central splitter installed.

Distance by car means nothing, its how far it is by wire. Its possible (though granted not likely) to live right next door to the exchange and still have a kilometre of copper between your modem and the DSLAM.

 

I live about 1.8 - 2 km drive to the exchange, and I'm a bit over 2.6 km by wire.

 

You ISP tech support may be able to tell you how far you are (I'm with iiNet and they're able to look it up.)

 

 

-A-

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Do you have references to back up your assertion that the term DSL can refer to consumer internet access that doesn't use twisted pair at all, darklife41?

He decided to leave the thread in a huff, rather than actually answer the questions raised.

 

Because quite obviously we're all blowing smoke, the ITU standards are hype, and cable modems have storage in them.

 

He hasn't backed up a single thing he's said. He hasn't provided ANY evidence for his ramblings at all. I provided a LONG LIST of links from an American company to back up my claim, but apparently it was Australian terminology. Go figure.

 

Oh, unless you count "Well it's different in America" as evidence.

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