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Electr0

Welcome To Linux (etc.)

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Bonjour everyone! (No i'm not French but that probably did get your attention) .... (Or not?)

Any who.

 

As i mentioned hither, i am a Windows boy, i entered this world on a comp running Win'95 and have progressed up to XP since then. I have a pretty good knowledge of Windows systems but when it comes to Linux, i am completely clueless. I think this is because i prefer GUI's as opposed to a terminal and punching out code, hovever, having said that i wouldn't mind rolling up my metaphorical sleves and getting my hands dirty learning about linux. So if anyone can teach me a thing or two about linux, right from the basics, i'm all ears.

 

Also if someone would explain the differences between Linux/BSD/etc/etc that would be great.

 

Or even just point me in the right direction, or lend me a copy of "Linux for Dummies" :P

 

This is one of the reasons why i have stayed away from it thus far:

Posted Image

 

and another reason:

Posted Image

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The difference between Linux/BSD/etc/etc is the kernel, essentially the thing that talks to your hardware. They pretty much all use the same software that you interact with, that's the GNU part. So when you hear someone say they are using GNU/Linux, that just means they are using an operating system that uses a linux kernel with some GNU software over the top of it.

 

Basically you just have to think of these types of operating systems as bits and pieces pasted together. That is where Linux distributions come into play, they are just something that packages the kernel and the other software together.

 

When starting out from scratch you are probably better sticking to Linux distributions due to the support. Most people will recommend you use Ubuntu as a first Linux distribution to get you started. Personally Im not a huge fan, but its not bad if you just need something that you can stick in a computer and have it work.

 

If you're afraid of partitioning hard drives you should have a go at using Ubuntu using some type of virtualisation software like virtualbox. I think VMware still give away free copies of vmware server (but Im not too sure). If you do it this way you won't have to worry about fucking up windows. If you do decide to dual boot (have the two operating systems on the one disk) make sure you back up everything you need. When starting out I must have formatted my disk about a million times over the first year or so. Mostly due to changing distributions though.

 

A couple of hints, don't get caught up in the battles like gnome vs kde and emacs vs vim, save that for a later date. When just starting out just use the basic stuff -- plain old Ubuntu. Also when starting out you should use the 32bit version, stay away from the 64 bit for now, it's got some compatability issues with things like flash and java.

 

a few link you may want to check out

http://www.ubuntu.com/

http://distrowatch.com/

http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/index.php

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A couple of hints, don't get caught up in the battles like gnome vs kde and emacs vs vim, save that for a later date. When just starting out just use the basic stuff -- plain old Ubuntu. Also when starting out you should use the 32bit version

Cool, thanks for the head up on that. Yeah i have heard of the gnome vs kde thing before, that just the different desktops or appearence thing-o aren't they?

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A proper post from me will be coming soon, basically small additions to what slimdog said.

 

For the moment though, I just wish to voice my support for VirtualBox over VMWare. It's a fair bit simplier and nicer to use without forfeiting important usability.

 

Rob.

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The best thing about Ubuntu is that you can get a taste of a mature an very full-featured distribution and decide whether the Linux world is for you based on the software available and your needs as a user.

 

One of the other reasons to start there is that all the features of a "bare bones" Linux installation are there, with a GUI fallback if you need to throw your hands up every now and again.

 

Personally I have stuck with Windows as my primary OS simply because I want to play games. Every now and again I stick my head into a couple of Linux distros to see how they're faring but I just don't have time to learn. As someone once said: Linux is only truly free if your time is worth nothing.

 

I don't mean to sound like a wet blanket. Another way of looking at it is as a free resource to learn how computers really work on the inside. If you're a true enthusiast, looking for a career in IT or just enjoy learning how to solve your own computer problems then Linux is the place to be and the community to be a part of.

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"My girlfriend said to me, "if you don't stop playing that damned guitar, I'm leaving", Fu*k, I miss her!"

 

There's plenty of support for nix's.

 

Here at atomicmpc, of course and at LQ (www.linuxquestions.org)

 

check it out.

 

Suse 11 is out now, mandriva 2009.0 is due mid october, and virtualbox can be used to run winxp from linux.

 

What are you worried about? ;-)

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"My girlfriend said to me, "if you don't stop playing that damned guitar, I'm leaving", Fu*k, I miss her!"

 

There's plenty of support for nix's.

 

Here at atomicmpc, of course and at LQ (www.linuxquestions.org)

 

check it out.

 

Suse 11 is out now, mandriva 2009.0 is due mid october, and virtualbox can be used to run winxp from linux.

 

What are you worried about? ;-)

 

And don't forget Intrepid Ibex is released in the next couple of weeks

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Hi, I use Ubuntu. I've tried a number of great distro's over the years, but find in Ubuntu, things 'just work' (sounds like an oxymoron in linux).

I, like most people found the initial time learning linux difficult and very frustrating at times.

I threw in the towel a number of times, but alway came back :)

So my point, hard work, and it will pay dividens in the end.

 

I dual-boot to Win XP, and also run a VM of Win XP (yes I have 2 Windows licences) as I need to run Windows specific software.

So may need to look at either of these, if you can't escape Windows.

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Hi, I use Ubuntu. I've tried a number of great distro's over the years, but find in Ubuntu, things 'just work' (sounds like an oxymoron in linux).

I, like most people found the initial time learning linux difficult and very frustrating at times.

I threw in the towel a number of times, but alway came back :)

So my point, hard work, and it will pay dividens in the end.

 

I dual-boot to Win XP, and also run a VM of Win XP (yes I have 2 Windows licences) as I need to run Windows specific software.

So may need to look at either of these, if you can't escape Windows.

No worries. Thanks. I might try that dual boot. And see if i can get a VM running too.

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Linux pro quotes...

The Linux Insecurity Complex

 

ref. http://penguinpetes.com/b2evo/index.php?ti...p;tb=1&pb=1.

 

"If I stop trying to be somebody else, the world will have to love me for who I really am."

"Linux is like air: Everywhere, but transparent to the casual observer."

"Anything that could have killed Linux has already been tried."

"Pigeons will always crap on the statues of heroes."

"Real love is earned, not bought."

"Act like a winner, and the world will treat you like one."

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i suggest that you burn a live cd or usb of a linux distro. this way there is no partitioning fiasco. sure VMWare if u really want to hastle with it, especially to get an idea about installing. personally my best linux experience has been with slackware. man i loved it, but i wouldnt start there. my only recommendation is by all means stay away from mandrake/mandriva. ubuntu looks alright havent really given it a go yet. probably stick with a consumer distro. stay away from unix but if u feel u must definitely recommend freebsd. imho setting up linux can be very hard and time consuming but very educational or too easy and pointless (im guessing ubuntu). so if you do get into it my main recommendation is that you have to get down and at least a little dirty. bit by bit. bring up bash, learn to use it. learn basic tools like ifconfig. learn a text editor like vim. learn how to compile from source. learn to install some drivers, mount NTFS partitions, all these sorts of things.

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i suggest that you burn a live cd or usb of a linux distro. this way there is no partitioning fiasco. sure VMWare if u really want to hastle with it, especially to get an idea about installing. personally my best linux experience has been with slackware. man i loved it, but i wouldnt start there. my only recommendation is by all means stay away from mandrake/mandriva. ubuntu looks alright havent really given it a go yet. probably stick with a consumer distro. stay away from unix but if u feel u must definitely recommend freebsd. imho setting up linux can be very hard and time consuming but very educational or too easy and pointless (im guessing ubuntu). so if you do get into it my main recommendation is that you have to get down and at least a little dirty. bit by bit. bring up bash, learn to use it. learn basic tools like ifconfig. learn a text editor like vim. learn how to compile from source. learn to install some drivers, mount NTFS partitions, all these sorts of things.

Hi kickstep I met you at the JB opening, I was the old fart wearing an Akubra good to see you here.

 

Anyway that's some good advice, see you next time I'm down that way : )

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Mandriva rocks!

 

I can't see how Mandriva is any worse than any other distribution, when was your last experience with it? and what Version was it?

 

by quickstep...

 

my only recommendation is by all means stay away from mandrake/mandriva

I have been using Mandriva since 10.0 (with the Uber Gateway tute). Problems don't occur for me I search them out, so disregard any probs you may have seen from me.

 

Cheers, Glenn

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do you have any reason to change like spouse held at gunpoint? or you just want to learn linux?

 

If the latter just make a virtual machine with the debian server cli installer on it. Set a goal to try and make a fully functional webserver with a few nifty goodies, raid as well as some nifty samba file sharing with authentification WITHOUT using any gui. Once you master the .conf file in general everything gets very easy.

 

after youve made a 1337 box by configuring it, time to learn how a linux system ticks by either using archlinux or gentoo and rolling your own. I liked the latter but there is alot of compliling to be done.

 

if you are thinking about making a physical server in the future make sure you read up on mdadm raid5 raid6 raid10 and lvm's.

 

Because ages back i was like you, installing linux as a desktop os in dual boot to try it and learn it but i just kept on using windows cause i needed to get work done at the same time, didnt have enough time to dedicate fully to mucking around.

 

Im not trying to say anything with this comment but in my eyes windows or osx is better as a desktop os overall in the sense that the commercial applications i need work, Pretty much all hardware works out of box without any driver issues and alot of the stuff i do seems to work nicer on windows.

 

That said ive had a few nix servers around the house, they are great for that. Atm in my house all of the desktops are windows based and the main server runs etch and my router/proxy/firewall pc was running pfsense but its been retired for a more simple modemrouter system.

 

Soon ill be setting up a freebsd box for funsies and i might get it to run all my external things like the htthost and openvpn stuff :P

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Throw a PCLinuxOS live CD in a drive and boot, play around.

 

Stable, easy to use distro.

 

They are working on a new version which will be released soon, currently up to the beta's.

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My first Distro was Ubuntu and I hated it >:(

That's the experience I had, nothing I can really put my finger on but I just didn't like Ubuntu...

 

...maybe it was more a KDE vs Gnome thing.

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That's the experience I had, nothing I can really put my finger on but I just didn't like Ubuntu...

 

...maybe it was more a KDE vs Gnome thing.

There's more than one Ubuntu. There's Kubuntu if you want KDE, and if you like xfce there's one for that, too.

 

I will throw my support behind the use of a virtual machine as opposed to dual-booting, for starters, at least. If you're really prepared to get your hands a little dirty and learn some stuff before you necessarily get to all the pretty eye candy, then I'd recomend Gentoo for Linux, or FreeBSD for BSD.

 

I'm primarily a FreeBSD user, and it's always served me really well. It also has an excellent documentation base, which goes a long long way if you're starting from scratch and learning.

 

If you've got any old computers laying around, using one of those for tinkering with a *nix is a great idea, too.

 

If you're in Sydney, I have a couple of Pentium III vintage Dells that I inherited, and am more than happy to give you (or anyone else) one for this kind of thing.

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There are three basic flavors of the Open Source OSes.

 

Unix: This is not free usually used for corporate servers, most common is Solaris

BSD: A derivative of Unix developed by Berkley University as is the basis for numerous Unix like OSes, as well as OSX

Linux: OSes based around Linus Torvalds Linux kernel, with a desktop manager of GDM or KDE. Most common are Ubuntu and Fedora followed by SUSE and Gentoo.

 

Gnome Desktop Manager was based around trying to make Linux more like windows, KDE is still considered the true linux desktop manager even though its popularity is now fading.

 

In my opinion an introduction to Linux would best be done through Ubuntu as it has XCE, KDE, and GDM options. It also has the largest support community and is reported to have the user numbers of all the other distributions combined. It also has a version that can be run from inside Windows. If you do use the default Ubuntu install Compiz, Emerald, and AWN for a nice dock too.

 

FreeBSD would by recommendation if you preferred to try a Unix based distro as it is the version the OSX was directly adapted from, and arguably the most popular.

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....This is one of the reasons why i have stayed away from it thus far:....

 

A small truth if you don't/cannot recognise the fine print.

 

Linux is a bit unhandlable if you do not bother to understand to use it from a specific angle of "What You Get".

You do not spend 250 - 500 dollars on touted guaranteed software, you spend money if ever on a stable release and carefully packaged and

documented set of programs and kernel thats' guarantee is only the media condition and appliant documentation and specifications of the

operational architecture.

 

Treat it as to WYSIWIG editor is its Kernel and integrated setup and software.

 

After that , "know how to" and "know why to" use the software first : e.g. You had a purpose in mind when you started an image in GIMP,

You had a purpose when you decided to write a shell script to edit some repetitive documents e.t.c.....

 

Linux is a tool that effectively operates with no real gaurantee against failure, its simply a hell of a good try or achievement that can all

but have guarantee.

 

Take it for what it is, Freeware that probably will operate and definitely does unless your unlucky.

 

An old business moto goes well with it ..."All care No Responsibility"...

 

Linux user info , basically...

http://www.nicephotog-jsp.net/linux-install.html

 

The binaries and kernel file system section(what it uses to run for a FAT) was et2 and added others for recognition.

 

Don't try to view it as MS Windows , Solaris or Mac OSX or HP UNIX e.t.c.

Its UNIX but its own entity and has what it has.

Learn to starve through it like a wolf in lean times if it appears bad at points.

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Gnome Desktop Manager was based around trying to make Linux more like windows, KDE is still considered the true linux desktop manager even though its popularity is now fading.

 

That there is funny in so many ways. :P

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I have Ubuntu, but I need to get my linux box working again. (damn PSU packed it in!)

 

I find Ubunu very frustrating, and it's code and Terminal confusing after being a windows guru.

 

Sometimes I fell like

.

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