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ok to start, buildin new comp for my cousin he purchased parts and i put together was just wodering cause the idiot bought a PSU without modular cables ie cant only install the ones you need, iwas wondering if its perfectly acceptable to cut off the ones not being used and just put abit of electrical tape around the ends because he has a relatively small case and even tying them up still takes up abit of room

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I'd be concerned that two wires in a bundle (e.g. earth and live) might end up touching, and it sounds like a recipe for disaster TBH. Perhaps others have experience with it but I'd be a bit freaked out by doing that unless you at the very least properly isolate the wires.

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First why not just return the PSU and exchange it for a modular one ?

 

If that's not possible for some reason then obviously you would make sure the power is off, and that any cables you remove will not be needed now (or in the future IE: adding a second drive ect), then those you don't need could be safely cut and individually wrapped in insulation tape.

 

Also remember if you do this you can kiss the warranty goodbye.

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A safer option is to unsolder it from the power supply PCB... but why not just bundle them up neatly and tuck it out of sight and the way of your airflow?

 

Another problem with cutting them off is, well they're simply not there when you want to use them!

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A safer option is to unsolder it from the power supply PCB... but why not just bundle them up neatly and tuck it out of sight and the way of your airflow?

 

Another problem with cutting them off is, well they're simply not there when you want to use them!

I beg to differ opening a PSU can be deadly so telling someone to do that is not advisable IMHO.

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It's not your rig so who cares about cable management. Also because it is not your rig don't do anything that can void warranty or could be potentially dangerous.

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I beg to differ opening a PSU can be deadly so telling someone to do that is not advisable IMHO.

True... especially when it's powered on.

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the idiot bought a PSU without modular cables

oh not its the end of the world the psu isnt modular well have to throw it out and get another... pft like it maters

id call him smart for not blowing cash on a gimic provided the psu is decent quality

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If you really want to cut off the extra cables do it right.

 

Cut wire to around 1-2 inches, use heat shrink tubing to properly insulate each wire individually, then bundle them and use a bigger diameter heat shrink or a cable tie for the whole (Short) bundle. Don't use electrical tape, over time in a hot PC case the adhesive can fail and can then cause problems.

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I beg to differ opening a PSU can be deadly so telling someone to do that is not advisable IMHO.

True... especially when it's powered on.

 

Even when it's off they can store enough power to kill a week later. :)

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I beg to differ opening a PSU can be deadly so telling someone to do that is not advisable IMHO.

True... especially when it's powered on.

 

Yea no kidding...

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I beg to differ opening a PSU can be deadly so telling someone to do that is not advisable IMHO.

True... especially when it's powered on.

 

Those capacitors will give you a nasty shock even if it's completely removed from mains power.

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well happy days thanks for all your inputs guys i went with cable tying them up to the roof of the case it look like abit of a monkeys abortion but oh well ill just wait to he buys another one, peace out

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well happy days thanks for all your inputs guys i went with cable tying them up to the roof of the case it look like abit of a monkeys abortion but oh well ill just wait to he buys another one, peace out

No reason for him to. Modular cabling is a frill, not something you should be calling you friend an idiot over. We lived without it for 30 years, you can deal with it now.

 

Good to know you got it sorted though, shows perseverance, a good trait.

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Those capacitors will give you a nasty shock even if it's completely removed from mains power.

Has someone done any tests to see the discharge rate of the caps in a typical power supply? Or maybe just measure the resistance seen at that point... Surely they can't hold charge for too long - definitely not a week later.

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Has someone done any tests to see the discharge rate of the caps in a typical power supply? Or maybe just measure the resistance seen at that point... Surely they can't hold charge for too long - definitely not a week later.

Which novice waits a week before modding something they shouldn't? I'd wager not many!

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Has someone done any tests to see the discharge rate of the caps in a typical power supply? Or maybe just measure the resistance seen at that point... Surely they can't hold charge for too long - definitely not a week later.

Which novice waits a week before modding something they shouldn't? I'd wager not many!

 

I don't think its really the voltage flowing inside the PSU thats the danger more so the AMPS since I think its what 5 amps that can stop your heart? and capacitors are designed to hold charge so its not like they are suddenly going to lose what they are storing when its turned off although it would be a good idea to discharge into the ground if you ask me.

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here

Those capacitors will give you a nasty shock even if it's completely removed from mains power.

Has someone done any tests to see the discharge rate of the caps in a typical power supply? Or maybe just measure the resistance seen at that point... Surely they can't hold charge for too long - definitely not a week later.

 

Just google it and you will see that it is so. Like this from Wikipedia

 

The capacitors inside can retain electric charge hours or days after the system has been off and powered down. The charge is strong enough to cause severe damage when touched.

And here,

 

Why is a power supply dangerous even after the power is disconnected?

 

Because of the big electric charge held within the capacitors inside it.

 

Capacitors store energy (power) for an indefinite time. Touching both leads of any capacitor can give you a real good jolt.

 

For example, your television set is a giant capacitor in electronic terms: even though a TV may have just been switched off and unplugged, there may still be about 40,000 volts stored up in its cathode ray tube (CRT) that will cause great harm unless proper precautions are taken to discharge it safely.

 

The same applies to a computer's power supply.

 

<><><>

 

Power supplies have large capacitors in them. These capacitors store electricity in them even when mains power is shut off. If you were to contact the connections on the bottom of the capacitors, you could receive a potentially lethal shock. For this reason, you should never disassemble a power supply unless you have received training in how to properly discharge the capacitors.

 

And here,

 

WARNING: Do not open the power supply, it contains capacitors which can hold Electricity (WHICH CAN KILL) even if the computer is power off for a week, if not longer. If you do open it, WHICH IS NOT RECOMMENDED, take all precautions and ensure you work with one arm behind your back to direct the electricity away from the heart. Also ensure that you have no jewelry on (such as a watch or rings). However, again, THIS IS NOT RECOMMENDED, and still cannot protect you 100% and is still potentially dangerous. Because of these precautions, no extensive information will be found on this page about opening power supplies.

 

You get the idea :)

Edited by bowiee

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WARNING: Do not open the power supply, it contains capacitors which can hold Electricity (WHICH CAN KILL) even if the computer is power off for a week, if not longer. If you do open it, WHICH IS NOT RECOMMENDED, take all precautions and ensure you work with one arm behind your back to direct the electricity away from the heart. Also ensure that you have no jewelry on (such as a watch or rings). However, again, THIS IS NOT RECOMMENDED, and still cannot protect you 100% and is still potentially dangerous. Because of these precautions, no extensive information will be found on this page about opening power supplies.

 

You get the idea :)

I think that holding your arm behind your back would do sweet fuck all since the electricity is going to go along the easiest way to a ground which is at a right angle from your arm touching the capacitor so in theory your heart would still be fried since the electricty may be running through/around it.

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WARNING: Do not open the power supply, it contains capacitors which can hold Electricity (WHICH CAN KILL) even if the computer is power off for a week, if not longer. If you do open it, WHICH IS NOT RECOMMENDED, take all precautions and ensure you work with one arm behind your back to direct the electricity away from the heart. Also ensure that you have no jewelry on (such as a watch or rings). However, again, THIS IS NOT RECOMMENDED, and still cannot protect you 100% and is still potentially dangerous. Because of these precautions, no extensive information will be found on this page about opening power supplies.

 

You get the idea :)

I think that holding your arm behind your back would do sweet fuck all since the electricity is going to go along the easiest way to a ground which is at a right angle from your arm touching the capacitor so in theory your heart would still be fried since the electricty may be running through/around it.

 

Agreed :) although they do say it's dangerous. But I only posted these examples to show edmund.tse that the caps in a psu can indeed be dangerous for a week or even longer. : )

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WARNING: Do not open the power supply, it contains capacitors which can hold Electricity (WHICH CAN KILL) even if the computer is power off for a week, if not longer. If you do open it, WHICH IS NOT RECOMMENDED, take all precautions and ensure you work with one arm behind your back to direct the electricity away from the heart. Also ensure that you have no jewelry on (such as a watch or rings). However, again, THIS IS NOT RECOMMENDED, and still cannot protect you 100% and is still potentially dangerous. Because of these precautions, no extensive information will be found on this page about opening power supplies.

 

You get the idea :)

I think that holding your arm behind your back would do sweet fuck all since the electricity is going to go along the easiest way to a ground which is at a right angle from your arm touching the capacitor so in theory your heart would still be fried since the electricty may be running through/around it.

 

Agreed :) although they do say it's dangerous. But I only posted these examples to show edmund.tse that the caps in a psu can indeed be dangerous for a week or even longer. : )

 

Yea well just look at the size of them, I remember what little tiny ones could do from physics when I was at school.

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I'll have to concede here because electricity is indeed dangerous. It's just that I would feel comfortable about tinkering inside PSUs.

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