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MisterK

Google Chrome OS

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Google is all about making everything available to everyone, via the internet. While their intentions started out good, I suspect privacy would become a thing of the past if they get their way. I'm a fan of their search engine, but can't say their software has ever appealed to me much, mainly for that reason.

 

Consider that AU and many other countries already have capped bandwidth, and that the USA is now considering it universally (already some ISPs have gone to capped usage). Bottom line is that bandwidth is finite, and the cloud is not currently a realistic solution for that reason. So now an OS will start up logged on, and upload and download everything to work? Get ready to up your current DL/UL cap just to use it.

On these two points;

I think you will find that there will be a big push in user data security soon, it'll be the driving force in "Web 3.0".

And most (if not all) of the ISPs that started down this path have stepped back due to customer backlash.

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Security and privacy can be quite separate things however. Most users will probably be happy to have all their info on Googles servers for the convenience factor, and will be happy to trust Google to keep it secure.

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hmmm, interesting :-) I've been idly waiting for OS thinking to step in this direction for a while now. In very general terms, I enjoy seeing some outside-the-box thinking. I realise that very little is new these days, and Google wouldn't be the first - this just happens to have some pretty influential mainstream clout behind it, some good timing perhaps :-) At the very least, it will get people thinking and talking :-)

 

As for this product in particular, I'm very interested to see how this pans out. I note that the article does make reference to netbooks in particular, so I'm not overly worried at this stage about cloud OS design somehow dominating the desktop (or enterprise) marketplaces just yet :-)

 

I don't pledge allegience to any particular browser software; I use Opera, Firefox, Chrome, IE and IceWeasle daily as I move between various machines and I'm generally happy with them. Most quibbles I have can be put down to carbon-based failures, usually when I've tried to use a keyboard shortcut or look for a menu item quickly and not realised I'm in the wrong browser :-p I really do enjoy the tab/process separation that Chrome's got going on, though - Google won a few points in my book for that :-)

 

So a Google Chrome OS, tailored (at least initially) towards netbooks with an emphasis on cloud computing, at the very least I'm hoping this will be an interesting process to watch :-) It's also interesting to see what theoretically (at this stage) amounts to a new paradigm for the Linux desktop (rather than another MS clone) can be like.

 

I'm going to wait and see before I critique it. Not a fan on 'cloud' dependency though.

I'd personally expand on that comment by saying I'm not a fan of cloud dependency in all situations of my computing experience :-)

 

I have to say that I do spend a fair bit of time in the cloud these days (that's not the same as having my head in the clouds :-p ) which, on a level, does kind of surprise me because it's something that I was always quite wary of (for security purposes). For example, I do the majority of my personal word processing through Google Docs, mainly for the convenience and accessibility but primarily because my requirements are quite shallow and GD caters to most of my needs. My personal email is also taken care of by web mail.

 

Just by moving these two functionalities to a web-based environment, I have found I am more personally productive, responsive and less tied down by my own data. So on some very basic levels, cloud computing has worked for me, although of course it's not to say it is a paradigm that will fit or work for the proverbial 'everyone' in 'all' situations :-) As for dependence, well, yes there are compromises, of course, just like with most aspects of this industry.

 

There are, however, aspects of my computing experience where the cloud really doesn't help me :-) I'm hardly going to bust out Photoshop and do some graphics work on my eeePC when on the bus to work in the morning :-) But using an eee in transit is ideal for me to drop in here, for example, or share testing notes with an international games dev team.

 

The implications for cloud OS design, now that's an interesting topic. Of course, initial thoughts do turn towards security and privacy. There are some things I would be inclined not to use the cloud for, and not every application is geared towards or would work in a web environment, and I think this will be reflected in OS development for some time to come yet.

 

I'm guessing this will be a bit more of a targeted thing, at least in the short term, rather than an ethos that completely redefines desktop computing and moves it into the cloud completely. I like the idea of having choices, though; my requirements when I'm on the road are different to those of my primary desktop environment, which are different again from my work requirements. I like the idea - in theory - of there being solutions (choices) that can be tailored more towards one set of requirements than another.

 

I'm always interested in things that can slim down things like boot times. I'm less interested in the idea of things "just working" as I am more than capable and, unless it's a particularly frustrating or tedious task, usually willing to fix, modify or customise things myself. In fact, that can be part of the fun of computing :-) And I'm certainly not a fan of things that lock you into a way of thinking or remove control from your hands entirely, although in some arenas one does get used to that (I'm thinking of the enterprise sector in particular here, with some very fond thoughts reserved for non-technical managers ;-) ).

 

Early days yet, but I'm at least interested to see how this will pan out :-)

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Elvenwhore,

 

Just a quick point, but IE has had tab/process separation since 7. Firefox, and by extension Iceweasel, were the only major browser to lack it, and are only just now starting to implement it.

 

I also don't think Chrome OS has much of anything to do with cloud computing. At the end of the day, it's just another linux distribution, with a fancy new windowing system to make it appear as the ultimate browser based OS. Nothing revolutionary, except for the company making it. Moblin Linux sounds a lot better, and will probably end up being more popular because of Intels market position.

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Howdy, Secret :-)

 

Just a quick point, but IE has had tab/process separation since 7. Firefox, and by extension Iceweasel, were the only major browser to lack it, and are only just now starting to implement it.

Yep, Google's not the first or only (my apologies, I should have made that clearer), but it's more simply the fact they did include it that won some points for me :-) In many ways, I didn't really have any expectations going into it, so to see that was a pleasant surprise... hey, sometimes I'm easily entertained :-) And funny it's come up, really, I was reading about FF's efforts at tab/process relationships just this morning, actually :-)

 

I also don't think Chrome OS has much of anything to do with cloud computing. At the end of the day, it's just another linux distribution, with a fancy new windowing system to make it appear as the ultimate browser based OS.

Hey, can't disagree with that :-) It's pretty much what I was thinking of when I said that fundamentally it's just a shift away from a standard windowing environment for Linux.

 

And I would agree this isn't necessarily revolution - it's got some influential backing which might give it more exposure than it would otherwise get, but my primary reason for interest is that it's a big name thinking in a bit of a different direction... which in itself may lead to further innovations. I'm interested in the impact this might have on the public's way of thinking of computing :-) Might :-)

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Awesome development. Google will be able to make something clean and simple and lightweight ... the antithesis of Windows.

IMHO The people that don't like Microsoft's behaviour will hate Google. Give it time my friends. Google are Evil. The enemy of my enemy is not my friend, so to speak ;)

 

Any of this or this look familiar?

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For those that are bashing it, how about trying it first huh, it's like saying "I hate ice cream, I've never had it but I hate it".

 

I think a properly informed decision would be better than a half baked "I think it will suck so it will", we should all be on the ball enough to realise that.

They should do what Microsoft did and release a beta. People will feel all privileged that they get to test it and go all kookoo over it :P

 

Rob.

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The Win7 RC shits all over Vista, so why wouldn't I be impressed?

Edited by iamthemaxx

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It's a good idea, along the same lines as the original Linux OS that ASUS shipped with the EeePC701 waaay back, except it's Google-flavoured.

 

Good for a range of netbooks with limited hardware specs and a fair idea of what users expect of the machine? Sure.

 

Good for a desktop distro where users will expect it to work with literally millions of different hardware configurations, peripherals and expectations? As much as I'd like it to happen, the Linux projects haven't managed it yet and even Apple hasn't dared take on MS in this arena. Google may succeed, but really I don't like the chances.

 

But as I said, as a netbook/touchnote platform: why not?

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For those that are bashing it, how about trying it first huh, it's like saying "I hate ice cream, I've never had it but I hate it".

 

I think a properly informed decision would be better than a half baked "I think it will suck so it will", we should all be on the ball enough to realise that.

 

It's going to be based on linux and not fullfil the functionality I require. It's not going to play full on games unless they use an open souce linux gpu solution.

 

I like ice-cream. Like I said above, it's early days but I have very low expectations. Great if you're too cheap to buy an o/s or a decent computer.

 

 

Security and privacy can be quite separate things however. Most users will probably be happy to have all their info on Googles servers for the convenience factor, and will be happy to trust Google to keep it secure.

 

*cough* google desktop *cough* gmail hacked *cough*

 

It will be secure, like your wallet with a junkie.

Edited by spaced

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For those that are bashing it, how about trying it first huh, it's like saying "I hate ice cream, I've never had it but I hate it".

 

I think a properly informed decision would be better than a half baked "I think it will suck so it will", we should all be on the ball enough to realise that.

 

It's going to be based on linux and not fullfil the functionality I require. It's not going to play full on games unless they use an open souce linux gpu solution.

 

I like ice-cream. Like I said above, it's early days but I have very low expectations. Great if you're too cheap to buy an o/s or a decent computer.

 

 

 

 

Full on games on a netbook ? That's really what it is aimed at netbooks.

Google Chrome OS is an open source, lightweight operating system that will initially be targeted at netbooks.

Have a read :)

 

EDIT: Fat fingers.

Edited by bowiee

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*cough* google desktop *cough* gmail hacked *cough*

 

It will be secure, like your wallet with a junkie.

I wasn't saying it will be secure...

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For those that are bashing it, how about trying it first huh, it's like saying "I hate ice cream, I've never had it but I hate it".

 

I think a properly informed decision would be better than a half baked "I think it will suck so it will", we should all be on the ball enough to realise that.

 

It's going to be based on linux and not fullfil the functionality I require. It's not going to play full on games unless they use an open souce linux gpu solution.

 

I like ice-cream. Like I said above, it's early days but I have very low expectations. Great if you're too cheap to buy an o/s or a decent computer.

 

 

 

 

Full on games on a netbook ? That's really what it is aimed at netbooks.

Google Chrome OS is an open source, lightweight operating system that will initially be targeted at netbooks.

Have a read :)

 

EDIT: Fat fingers.

 

Their press release said that it would be designed for net books to top end desktops.

 

It says it here:

 

Google Chrome OS is being created for people who spend most of their time on the web, and is being designed to power computers ranging from small netbooks to full-size desktop systems.

 

*cough* google desktop *cough* gmail hacked *cough*

 

It will be secure, like your wallet with a junkie.

I wasn't saying it will be secure...

 

Yeah I wasn't having a go at you, was agreeing with you.

 

---------------------------

 

We don't need another linux based distro, feck knows we've got enough. What we need is a completely new operating system. Something scalable that will compete with Windows. Easy to use and easy to support.

Edited by spaced

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What we need is a completely new operating system. Something scalable that will compete with Windows. Easy to use and easy to support.

And why not start with Linux?

 

Rob.

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Because Linux is not a completely new operating system. As to whether or not Linux would serve in place of a completely new operating system....

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amiga os... oh how I have fond memories of workbench. I wonder if amiga os 4 can be loaded on a netbook. not to trail so far off topic..

I already asked that question Here

 

(I'm The_Editor..... MagicSN is a Hyperion Coder... (Hyperion own Os4))

 

The Top Dog of Hyperion gives his view HERE

 

I really don't know how Hyperion is going to recoup that money. If they'd gone to x86 instead of PPC years ago they'd have been able to get in on the netbook market from the get go. AFAIK there are no PPC based netbooks, anyway. And even if there were, I can't see them being cheap.

 

I can see why Google want to go with a linux base for Google OS - ie it's dirt cheap - but I wonder if Hyperion contacted Google, if they'd help get anything happening : \

 

 

 

As far as a cloud-based OS, I think I'd be less concerned if the apps can be run locally, rather than only via the web. I would much rather rely on power networks to be working, over comm networks to be working (especially wireless phone networks), when it comes to being able to actually do any work. I'm not sure how 'new' it'll even be, as far as a web-based desktop. Windows has, from memory, been able to integrate web content onto the desktop itself since ie4 shipped or something (even if it wasn't necessarily nice integration). Mozilla (I think) have a cut-down version of firefox, I think, that can be used to only handle things like webmail (thus keeping it in a separate process from the actual browser, in case there are crashes etc). Creating one type of symbolic link or another to map web data storage locations to a local device, netbook or otherwise, also sounds like it'd be relatively trivial (I think there have been gmail extensions out for a year or two, at least, that let Explorer et al (on Windows systems) map online storage to the local file system).

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Their press release said that it would be designed for net books to top end desktops.

 

It says it here:

 

Google Chrome OS is being created for people who spend most of their time on the web, and is being designed to power computers ranging from small netbooks to full-size desktop systems.

Full size != top end.

 

This is a full-size desktop, and would be the particular flavour of desktop they'd be targeting.

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Full size != top end.

 

This is a full-size desktop, and would be the particular flavour of desktop they'd be targeting.

True, but nonetheless people have certain expectations of a full-size box that are not present for a netbook - specifically in relation to peripheral support and software availability. IMHO people are prepared to treat a Netbook kinda like a phone, in that it's an appliance that does a few things well. More is expected of the "beige box" (though now typically black) under a desk.

 

Now, a compromise that combines something like an HDMI media-box with a basic Eee-style Linux distro for doing internet-type-stuff on your HDTV. Replace those composite cables with an extra couple USB, Gigabit ethernet and perhaps eSATA; build in a a ~1-4GB SSD (to keep costs down) with the custom ChromeOS, media software and bluetooth, and you're ready for Eee-style computing on your couch. Plug in any USB or eSATA external HDD (or attach to your network) and you can find, download and watch your pr0n without leaving your living room.

Edited by thesorehead

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There is nothing wrong with X. Otherwise, what are the problems you think X has and why should it be replaced?

Edited by TheSecret

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I'll reserve full judgement for when I actually try it, but it's just another Linux distro (do we really need s many) and I know I don't like Linux - it's not for me. So unless I can use the same media to install Office on my Server 2008 R2 build, and then on my netbook running Chrome than it doesn’t have a fighting chance.

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