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absarc

Blu-Ray.....Worth it yet?

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Oh this could prove to be an interesting 2010. With Intels new CPUs, DX11, ATI HD 5xxx series and now a new format?

 

Lol i might just give up upgrading my computer now. Everytime i do an upgrade some new stuff comes out! It's frustrating lol.

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From my perspective the issue with Blu-Ray is the components needed to support it, a monitor that can display it, a graphics can that can process it, and a player that can read it (potentially too a dedicated audio card and speakers that can 'share the noise'). How often do these three components get updated? Most people use their burners until they die, GPU perhaps once a year or 18 months, and monitors - I suck with my 17" LCD for 5 years, probably do the same with my 22".

 

As discussed above, Blu-Ray doesn't provide a cheap medium for back ups or general data storage, also the extra content they supply on their movies - well how many interviews etc or out takes do people want to watch? For myself I don't watch the extra crap now on DVD, why would I want more (which in turn makes the production of the movie slightly more expensive)?

 

Save you money and put it towards a SSD.

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Well...here I was thinking it might be worthwhile upgrading to a blue ray/dvd combo drive/burner...intel quadcore Q6600 @ stock speeds, 8GB DDR-2 800mhz RAM, Nvidia 8800GT 512mb video card - that should be all powerful to take advantage of blue ray movies shouldn't it? Oh, and a Samsung 24" 245B LCD monitor.

 

Since the previous replies are all quite old, what do you guys think now?

 

Dave

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I am in the same boat as a previous poster...I have a blu ray burner, but havent used its burning abilities simply because the blank BD's are still too expensive, i refuse to pay over $5 per disk....

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Yeah, it's not cheap for blank disks, but then, blank DVD disks weren't cheap either when they first came out.

 

Dave

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Got a cheap PS3 to try blu ray on my 1080p projector, will find out then if its worth it! lol

 

I wouldnt bother with blu ray on PC though tbh

Edited by sgtsmithy

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The only reason I would get a blu-ray burner for my pc is to burn blu-ray movies to watch on my PS3, which is entirely redundant thanks to streaming. Blu-ray movies are good yes, but I can't think of any other purpose for it yet.

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So, in this instance, as long as DVD movies are still available, and dvd-r/dvd+r etc etc blank media is still available and nicely priced, blu-ray will do SFA? Cos, that's how I read it. Even now, a 1000 titles. And, it's going to be really restricted to the newer movies, the classics aren't just good enough quality wise to convert to blu-ray. Oops, according the the FAQs, that should be Blu-ray™. lol. Sorry, taking the piss out of the blu-ray consortium. I wish hd-dvd had won, no region coding for starters. Why oh why won't our federal government ban region coding on DVDs as it's anticompetitive?

 

Dave

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I remember when my first dvd burner cost me $400... Blank dvds did cost alot at the time. but prices dropped rapidly due to the uptake of dvd

Blu-ray has not had the same speed of uptake due to people not seeing the need for such an expence as many dont see the significant difference in quality of the image and sound...the fools

 

The majority of blu-rays are region free, as stated previously it will depend upon the producer/studio that makes the release.

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Blu-ray has not had the same speed of uptake due to people not seeing the need for such an expence as many dont see the significant difference in quality of the image and sound...the fools

Not fools, they're intelligent. The future is downloadable content rather than optical discs. And even then, no one will have the need for a burner.

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I disagree. Download content. HDD fails, no backup. Dang, I lost that movie. Sure, it might only be a few dollars, but it's still a few dollars. If it's only a few dollars, how about ever Atomican donate a few dollars to me ;-) I mean, it's only a few dollars. (please note the sarcasm in my typing tone). Furthermore, downloadable content only further increases DRM, which I'm against on principle. DRM is great for the content owner, but *very* bad for the consumer. Period.

 

Quark - I believe hd-dvd had no region coding at all. Let's consider an example - I *really* like the anime Hellsing. I've love to buy the Hellsing OVA DVD sets, but guess what - region 1 and 2 only. Why should I be discriminated against based on where I live? Sure, I could be a multi region DVD player probably, but that's not the point. Region coding is a form of discrimation (based on regional location). No government wants to touch it because they're afraid of pissing of the mighty US of A.

 

Dave

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The only reason I would get a blu-ray burner for my pc is to burn blu-ray movies to watch on my PS3, which is entirely redundant thanks to streaming. Blu-ray movies are good yes, but I can't think of any other purpose for it yet.

QFT!

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I disagree. Download content. HDD fails, no backup. Dang, I lost that movie. Sure, it might only be a few dollars, but it's still a few dollars. If it's only a few dollars, how about ever Atomican donate a few dollars to me ;-)

That's why they invented the concept of 'backups'. Not to mention the fragile nature of optical discs. Scratch the upside of one of these, and there goes over $20 right there.

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I disagree. Download content. HDD fails, no backup. Dang, I lost that movie. Sure, it might only be a few dollars, but it's still a few dollars. If it's only a few dollars, how about ever Atomican donate a few dollars to me ;-)

That's why they invented the concept of 'backups'. Not to mention the fragile nature of optical discs. Scratch the upside of one of these, and there goes over $20 right there.

 

I'm in agreement there. With everything there's a chance something will break/corrupt/become unuseable but there are things that that is more likely to happen. One of those things i optical drives. They are more likely to be snapped in half, scratched and used as a frisby. A hard drive is less likely to though you still need backps

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Not from my experience, perhaps I treat my audio CDs and DVDs better than most then. In near 13 years of using a computer (I was a late adopter, at least for my age group), I've *never* snapped a disk, nor have I dropped and scratched a single disk to the point where it wasn't usable. I have had a fair number of drives fail though.

 

And yes, I know about backups, but most people don't. Think ordinary computer users here, not the super cluey atomicans. That's one of the main things I see with advanced computer users - they seem to make the elementary mistake of thinking that everyone else has their elite skills. Ordinary users don't have those skills, and furthermore, from my experience of working nearly 10 years in the support industry, they don't care, nor do they want to learn it.

 

Dave

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I don't scratch CD's often but it does happen when putting them in a bag etc and they get crushed etc etc

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Similarly, many people don't care about Blu-Ray; advanced skills or not. But I bet there's a shit tonne of people out there getting their moves online - legit or otherwise.

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Oh I know that people are getting their movies via downloads an awful LOT. I work for an ISP. I see it day in, day out. Personally, the easiest way of stopping illegal downloading is to force ISPs to limit download amounts. There's no need for 30, 40, 50GB limits per month. I guarantee that anyone on those plans and using all that data is doing it on illegal deeds. I prefer to pay for my software and movies legitimately. Yes, I know that there's the ability to download legitimate content as well, and that limiting download amounts per month will limit some people from using their connections for legitimate purposes. But, let's be honest here - they're a minority. A vast minority.

 

I think you'll find that there's going to be some very interesting changes to ISPs being forced on them by the courts, and this will make it harder for us (more work to monitor things), and more difficult and costly for those that illegally download content. In the month prior to Christmas, we saw a vast increase in copyright infringement notices, probably quadrupled over the average monthly amount for the preceeding year. I'm no fan of the RIAA or MPAA, or DRM, or in fact modern copyright a la DMCA.

 

Anyways, back on topic - blu-ray seems to be reasonably priced these days (some discs going for $20, average around $30, new releases around $35 unless they're on special, which is quite often). The price differential between them and DVDs isn't too great. The hardware is more expensive (PC component wise) by a fair bit, and also stand alone blu-ray players are more expensive than their DVD counterparts too, although by not as much as PC components I reckon. I wish the media would come down in price, but I suspect that deliberate price fixing is a part of this issue in particular. Only time will tell. I wonder if blu-ray will go the way of the likes of SACD and DVD-audio (both pretty much defunct audio formats now to be honest). Perhaps people are not prepared to buy their entire movie collections again in another format. Then again, if manufacturers do what they have done for CRT monitors and VHS player/recorders (i.e. stop producing them) for DVD gear, then people will be forced to buy blu-ray. Interesting times ahead methinks.

 

Dave

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Oh I know that people are getting their movies via downloads an awful LOT. I work for an ISP. I see it day in, day out. Personally, the easiest way of stopping illegal downloading is to force ISPs to limit download amounts. There's no need for 30, 40, 50GB limits per month. I guarantee that anyone on those plans and using all that data is doing it on illegal deeds. I prefer to pay for my software and movies legitimately. Yes, I know that there's the ability to download legitimate content as well, and that limiting download amounts per month will limit some people from using their connections for legitimate purposes. But, let's be honest here - they're a minority. A vast minority.

 

I think you'll find that there's going to be some very interesting changes to ISPs being forced on them by the courts, and this will make it harder for us (more work to monitor things), and more difficult and costly for those that illegally download content. In the month prior to Christmas, we saw a vast increase in copyright infringement notices, probably quadrupled over the average monthly amount for the preceeding year. I'm no fan of the RIAA or MPAA, or DRM, or in fact modern copyright a la DMCA.

Well, I use the TPG 60/60 plan, and I never download illegal material. Large quota doesn't mean illegal downloads. Limiting quota won't fix the problem, it'll shift it elsewhere.

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That is not my, or my work colleagues experience or views. I guess time will tell.

 

Dave

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Yah see I agree, most of the people I know who have that big of quotas are downloading illegally or they watch videos all day which should be illegal anyway :)

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my 2c re: DRM, copyright and digital distribution -

 

iTunes - music, video, podcasts and vodcasts. If the prices were lower and caps were higher I'd not have my TV connected to the antenna - I'd have my PC plugged in, getting my entertainment and news through the PC when, how and where I want it.

 

Maybe it wouldn't all be PC. Maybe I'd use a 360 for the occasional HD movie. But the point is that there is enough legal, desirable content out there that I'd be shaped in no time with current Aussie interwebz.

 

Another option would be to have a 10 or 20 GB cap, adding iTunes to the now-common "cap-free download zone". I'd go for that at the right price.

 

 

Re; the relevance of BRD - at the moment it's only really good for movies. Personally I'd prefer to buy non-DRM (or "rental"), HD DLC from iTunes/wherever.

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Well, I took the plunge and bought a Pioneer BDR-205BKRP. Price was right ($280 or so from umart). Haven't installed it yet. Gotta replace a pata burner and 2 hdds in this machine at the same time, will do it tomorrow.

 

Dave

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