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Lord-Ezekiel

Getting an Apple Mac for the first time ever

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Only ever owned a Windows PC for my whole life, and now wanting to get a Mac as well.

This has largely come about because i am just about to start a new job as a computer salesperson & repair technician for PCs & Macs (and will be needing to get Apple certified so i can repair Macs as well).

 

Just wanting to know what i might need to know about them that might take a Windows XP user (myself) by surprise.

What are some good websites to learn about them and their features?

And what peoples experience has been like learning the ins and outs of Macs after using Windows for a long time.

Edited by Lord-Ezekiel

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I've 2c - not a tech myself, but ...

 

IMHO., really the question is more about how flexible you are.

 

There are people out there whose brains are practically hardwired into whatever system they're accustomed to. This extends to not only computer systems but things like accounting, driving and engineering principles. The principles these people "grew up" with are sound and fine, they're just not open to changing them anytime soon.

 

Then there are people who are able to adapt relatively easily to any new system. These people often invent their own way of doing things because the system they start with was designed by one of the people above. Of course there are shades of grey in between.

 

If you are a flexible-type person, the Mac learning process is pretty quick and easy. If you've any familiarity with Unix or Linux it's very much like coming home. I spent a year using a Mac at work and it really did strike me as what would happen to Linux if Ubuntu was backed by good industrial design, hardware control and lots of cash.

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I myself worked as a computer technician for 2 1/2 years and about 8 months through my job we ended up getting an apple reseller license and warranty contract. Macs on the inside are like any intel based computer. (God bless my soul I'll never have to take one apart again)

 

 

There easy to fix just like any other PC though they do take abit more time. (which Apple dosent pay you for) though all the same things happen to them like you would see on any other PC.

 

Software trouble shooting is another issue. I would perhaps install Ubuntu and play around wtih that for abit , they look all pretty and complex but there really isnt to much to them.

 

I got my accreditation for a MAC tech and OSX server which has helped me quite well in pursuing other jobs . As sorehead just said you just need to be flexible and open minded Good luck mate

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I've never used Unix or Linux before - why would it help to use them, and Ubuntu in particular?

Wouldn't i be best off getting myself a copy of Mac OSX?

 

I have always had a bit of an aversion to Macs (not really 'Mac hate' though) , mainly because i know how to use Windows and on a Mac i feel like i have had my control taken away from me... not really the Mac's fault though i guess.

 

I have just been fiddling around with my house mates Macbook with Leopard installed, and i must say: it's pretty damn sweet after using Windows XP for so long - there are a lot of features which i am slowly finding that are great, like the easily accessible widgets, and the ease of installing programs (just drag and drop), etc.

One question though - is there an "enlarge window to full screen" button/shortcut in OSX? (like there is in almost every window in Windows XP up the top right)

 

 

And are Mac's easily upgradeable hardware wise? (eg, is upgrading ram as easy as a PC?)

Do they have a list of compatible hardware, or do they only let you use specific 'Apple' branded hardware?

Edited by Lord-Ezekiel

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(1) I've never used Unix or Linux before - why would it help to use them, and Ubuntu in particular?

(2) Wouldn't i be best off getting myself a copy of Mac OSX?

 

(3) I have always had a bit of an aversion to Macs (not really 'Mac hate' though) , mainly because i know how to use Windows and on a Mac i feel like i have had my control taken away from me... not really the Mac's fault though i guess.

 

I have just been fiddling around with my house mates Macbook with Leopard installed, and i must say: it's pretty damn sweet after using Windows XP for so long - there are a lot of features which i am slowly finding that are great, like the easily accessible widgets, and the ease of installing programs (just drag and drop), etc.

(4) One question though - is there an "enlarge window to full screen" button/shortcut in OSX? (like there is in almost every window in Windows XP up the top right)

 

 

(5) And are Mac's easily upgradeable hardware wise? (eg, is upgrading ram as easy as a PC?)

(6) Do they have a list of compatible hardware, or do they only let you use specific 'Apple' branded hardware?

OK, numbers and answers added:

 

(1) If you're serious about offering tech services, learning Linux thoroughly will ground you in the principles used in all modern operating systems. It'll also be another string to your bow and be good groundwork for most of the non-Windows world.

(2) If it worked easily on non-Apple hardware, sure. But it doesn't without hacks, and IMHO you may as well get a free Linux distro if what you want to do is learn.

 

(3) This is why learning Linux is a good idea - control is still there, it's just buried a little bit.

 

(4) Check the coloured buttons on the top-left of each Mac window. IIRC you have close, minimise and maximise - though something tells me that "maximise" means "full vertical size" in Mac-speek. Or something.... *shrug*

 

(5) No. Ram is reasonably easy on a Macbook (or it was, anyway) - iMacs are the same as any other all-in-one: you can't just unscrew the side and stick in another GPU

 

(6) Mac's peripheral support is pretty good - printers, HIDs, scanners, cameras - no problems, generally. Worth checking for things like TV tuners and video capture USB thingos. Internal hardware support is not so good - these machines are not intended to be upgraded by the user.

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Apple make it really hard for DIY hardware repairs on Apple stuff so you have to trust your local Apple resellers.

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Is it hard to use?

No.

There are a few things, but once you work out the shortcuts, it's pretty easy and intuitive. Command basically acts like control. You use it for shortcuts, and you use it to select multiple items without selecting everything in between. The similarities, are in most part due to MS "adopting" the conventions apple started with their classic OS. That's basically a polite way of saying their ui designers got whiplash copying what they could. On the plus side, there are many new features that windows either hasn't adopted, or hasn't adopted so that they work as well.

 

Configuration wise, the control panels are easy to use. You can search the control panels for terms with spotlight, which is nice. If you don't like the GUI control panels, you can unix hardcore your settings to your heart's content.

 

Some people say os x has a 'tonka toy' interface. I think having a neat, simple interface, with UNIX power underneath for those that need it, is a good idea. The ridiculous nested interfaces of windows never existed on the mac os. For example, the winXP 'wireless' interface, which had so many interlinking buttons, would be a flat out joke on os x. You shouldn't have to right click your network icon (if it's displayed), select status, then properties, then TCP/IP to get the settings you want. In OS X, the network control panel lists all the network interfaces, and uses a standard layout to unify them all. At the same time it's very flexible.

 

I've never found that OS X is incapable of something, simply because it has a 'simpler' more unified configuration UI.

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Apple make it really hard for DIY hardware repairs on Apple stuff so you have to trust your local Apple resellers.

 

Lol trust Isn't a Word I would use. I went to the nextbyte's repair center in Brisbane and they were using Butter knives to pull apart mac minis (Metal not plastic like you should use)

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Lol trust Isn't a Word I would use. I went to the nextbyte's repair center in Brisbane and they were using Butter knives to pull apart mac minis (Metal not plastic like you should use)

Mate, the recommended tool is a putty knife (metal).

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Lol trust Isn't a Word I would use. I went to the nextbyte's repair center in Brisbane and they were using Butter knives to pull apart mac minis (Metal not plastic like you should use)

Mate, the recommended tool is a putty knife (metal).

 

Im only speaking from experience when I was working at a autherorised repair agent. When I bought the apple tool kit they were plastic putty knives. And In reguards to nextbyte I mean they were using bread knives like from the kitchen not putty knives,one of the guys snapped the clips all along the inside of the case

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How did you go?

Fear / Expectations overcome?

Personally I've been with windows since 3.11 and Mac since OS7.

The insides are all the same tech (especially now with intel), and the OS is just a matter of finding the nearest equivalent to what you know.

That's been my experience looking at linux for the first time.

Proboaly the biggest difference IMO is the operators.

Mac users will screw something because they were too lazy to learn, and PC users will screw something up to learn. (done both)

Either way it's more about understanding what led to the problem.

Things like networking, hardware configuration are almost identical.

Probably the biggest hurdle is more the mindset associated with applications.

ie: Adobe CS vs Microsoft Office have vastly different ways of doing similar things.

(linux has equivalents of both)

3rd party apps are the greatest source of problems and conflicts.

 

There's always more to learn, Good luck.

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