Jump to content
Can't remember your login details? Read more... ×
Sign in to follow this  
holdenmaniac

Programming

Recommended Posts

Hey people,

 

Firstly, I would like apologize if the typing odf this post isn't very good, had a few to many, if ya know what I mean (actually i haven't had much at all, I just haven't drunk in about 14 months).

 

I just have a quick query, I live in Perth, WA and would like to study programming, I plan to start at tafe and move to Uni (I know what course I need to do at Uni). Basically I want to study PC Games Development, I plan to do Computer Science with a major in Games Programming at Murdoch uni, my questions is, whats the best way to prepare myself for the course. (I already know what i need to get into uni (Cert 4 of Programming at tafe) but I don;t just want to do any random course, I want to properly prepare myself for this, so that I can perform to the best of my ability.

 

Any Ideas?

 

HoldenManiaC

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could probably try getting in touch with some of the University course leaders, and have a chat to them about appropriate preliminary material. Some universities will teach C programming, others Java, others begin with other languages! Giving yourself a headstart on the first year material is really going to boost your confidence and understanding of everything.

 

If it's games programming, I'd suggest you have a look into OpenGL programming, and maybe take the time to do a few preliminary excercises. I can personally recommend Interactive Computer Graphics and the OpenGL Primer as excellent books by Edward Angel. The first is a textbook style detail of viewports, coordinates and the graphical manipulations that go on inside computer graphics. The latter is a series of practical examinations of the same material in the OpenGL world, and also guides you through programming examples.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've had a chat to a Uni lecturer, he basically said a Cert 4 programming, and if in desperate, a Diploma of Software Development..

 

I know Pascal (LOL!), Delphi, Action Script, Python, and Java already, the uni I want to attend (Murdoch) is very balanced (ie. Practical and Theory) and (by about the 2/3rd year) concentrate alot on game engine programming

 

I really looking for PC games development specific programming courses pre-uni

 

Just to clarify a little more, really only looking at Games Programming, I loose interest quickly (i have no idea why) with 3D modelling etc...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i havent looked too much into pre uni courses but the few ive vaguely heard of are with AIT and another technical college esque facility sorry i forget the name, but they can take u to uni or industry. one point i should note is from everything i've read about this career path, employers will generally ignore certifications and mainly look at your real merits (interest, demos, games, engines, or anything else as such you have/have made) so you will want a good portfolio. if you are interested in learning but not the qualification before you really can do a lot on your own. im in the middle of refreshing my C++ while getting back into SDL and then i plan on some small projects on the nintendo DS. just grab some books off amazon.com or even just online references. there are infinite resources out there.

 

the great thing about SDL is it is easy to pick up (much nicer than directdraw/3d), its portable (windows, linux, mac, and even iphones and other portables ive heard). you can use opengl through it too. what exactly is it you want to achieve in this pre uni course? perhaps you could enter a small competition for homebrew games (there are a lot out there). try to get involved, see how you like it and learn from this? perhaps we're on a different page here but this is just my 2 cents.

 

bear in mind i only have a little experience with SDL on windows and a game engine for the GP32, i am going to take QUT's interactive game development course and probably major in programming.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with kikz. I think this is the kind of thing where your qualifications aren't going to matter a whole lot. What you learnt while getting said qualifications may, but the qualifications themselves, probably not so much.

 

Unfortunately, I don't think you're likely to find open-source demos, because they'd be a great reference to look at and see some of the nifty tricks done. Demo programmers have long had reputations for being fucking maniacs who do some miraculous things.

 

Writing games is a good idea. Get some real practise in and see what you can learn. SDL is a good option to use in your projects, and you can decide further down the track if it's something you want to keep using, or if you want all the code to be yours.

 

I vaguely recall reading an article that suggests the first game you should write is a tetris clone, and then a breakout clone, before moving onto other projects.

 

Get a game written, then tweak it, try and find complicated bits and see if you can think of an ingenius way to do it with fewer steps. Add extra features to your game, and continually tweak. For your breakout clone, once it's done, you could look at making it more like an arkanoid clone. Really go nuts. Try, tune and tweak.

 

Good luck with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i am going to take QUT's interactive game development course and probably major in programming.

Word of advice: don't, or at least research it thoroughly.

When I looked at it (2 years ago) it was absolutely horrible, which is why I ended up at Griffith.

 

OP: Personally, I'd wet my hands with a little bit of flash games (I like making them QQ) or with some light modding of perhaps the source engine.

You don't have to get too serious too quickly though, you should be able to learn a lot as you progress through Uni (afterall, that's half the idea).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i am going to take QUT's interactive game development course and probably major in programming.

Word of advice: don't, or at least research it thoroughly.

When I looked at it (2 years ago) it was absolutely horrible, which is why I ended up at Griffith.

 

OP: Personally, I'd wet my hands with a little bit of flash games (I like making them QQ) or with some light modding of perhaps the source engine.

You don't have to get too serious too quickly though, you should be able to learn a lot as you progress through Uni (afterall, that's half the idea).

 

 

could you please elaborate on the horrible? my original choice was at deakin in melbourne, then RMIT and i had thought just a computer science/it degree and major in games. ive heard a lot of skeptical things about all of these courses (most of them seem to teach java, too basic, etc) what made you move to griffith over qut?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I second that about QUT. When I started there it was decent, better than both UQ and griffith in terms of it's course structure. It slowly went down the drain however, to the point where they teach Microsoft and Cisco centric technologies, and have about 20 majors to choose from, each differing by as little as one subject.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

could you please elaborate on the horrible? my original choice was at deakin in melbourne, then RMIT and i had thought just a computer science/it degree and major in games. ive heard a lot of skeptical things about all of these courses (most of them seem to teach java, too basic, etc) what made you move to griffith over qut?

Horrible, as in not really applicable to the arena you want to get into.

 

Sure, my course isn't spectular too (although, the newer version is apparently even better) but QUT's games course was a joke compared to mine at the time. Not sure about the rest of their IT programs though.

 

UQ doesn't have one AFAIK, however if you were to do Software Engineering by itself and learn the games development outside then it would be my pick.

 

I learnt a bit of Java in my course. They use it to teach programming fundementals. You have to remember that most courses go from basic to advanced, so there's always going to be a fair amount of low level crap everywhere.

 

QANTM is also an option, although you pay through the nose, and the focus is very narrow and the pace rather quick. I'm not sure if it's a good or a bad idea.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

could you please elaborate on the horrible? my original choice was at deakin in melbourne, then RMIT and i had thought just a computer science/it degree and major in games. ive heard a lot of skeptical things about all of these courses (most of them seem to teach java, too basic, etc) what made you move to griffith over qut?

Horrible, as in not really applicable to the arena you want to get into.

 

Sure, my course isn't spectular too (although, the newer version is apparently even better) but QUT's games course was a joke compared to mine at the time. Not sure about the rest of their IT programs though.

 

UQ doesn't have one AFAIK, however if you were to do Software Engineering by itself and learn the games development outside then it would be my pick.

 

I learnt a bit of Java in my course. They use it to teach programming fundementals. You have to remember that most courses go from basic to advanced, so there's always going to be a fair amount of low level crap everywhere.

 

QANTM is also an option, although you pay through the nose, and the focus is very narrow and the pace rather quick. I'm not sure if it's a good or a bad idea.

 

UQ offered games related subjects way back when I was doing undergrad there. They were one on OpenGL and game engine design, and one on AI (I did the later, though not because of games :)). A few years later I heard they were teaching DirectX and using .NET instead of C/C++.

 

Now they're offering Multimedia Design degrees, where you can major in Game Design.

 

http://study.itee.uq.edu.au/degree_program...s/GamesMod.html

http://study.itee.uq.edu.au/degree_programs/BInfTech/ <- Includes a games major.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

now im concerned ill have to change my qtac :(

 

i had always been a little skeptical now im outright worried.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

UQ offered games related subjects way back when I was doing undergrad there. They were one on OpenGL and game engine design, and one on AI (I did the later, though not because of games :)). A few years later I heard they were teaching DirectX and using .NET instead of C/C++.

 

Now they're offering Multimedia Design degrees, where you can major in Game Design.

 

http://study.itee.uq.edu.au/degree_program...s/GamesMod.html

http://study.itee.uq.edu.au/degree_programs/BInfTech/ <- Includes a games major.

:|

 

I understood they did a few subjects on games related stuff, but didn't think they had a degree based around it. That's pretty neat ^_^

 

edit: based on that, I'd probably choose the SE degree at UQ and stay on perhaps an extra year doing more games related courses is possible. My degree is similar (I do a dual degree) in that it combines SE with games development, and after having studied it for 3 years I think it's a much more well rounded idea than just getting straight into the programming. Not sure if there's perhaps *too* much maths in the UQ degree, I didn't really find my maths courses too useful as if I ever needed to know something I could usually look it up rather easily instead of having to know it off by heart.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Something you can do personally is download XNA and fuck around with it a bit.

 

You can achieve cool things with some relatively simple code, and will ease you in to programming as a concept.

 

C# also happens to be a handy language to know. A nice blend between power and ease-of-coding.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×