Jump to content
iamthemaxx

ACTA - the secret copyright treaty for the world no one can see

Recommended Posts

As I understand it, ACTA is a plurilateral agreement, so would not be compulsory, even for WTO members. I also read something somewhere regarding the nature of implementing it, something about the implementation being largely up to the country, including being able to ignore certain aspects of it, but I can't find the link...

 

Don't get me wrong, I think it's a load of shit, and another example of industry getting their own way any way possible. I'm just not considering the situation dire yet. IIRC the government has already said that there will be public discussion on it once the discussions on it are complete, and there's also the fact that many countries are outright against many of the more bullshit terms.

 

As for electronic border searches, the US is already doing this. It's bullshit, but if you're traveling there, leave any private information or copyright content that you won't be able to prove the right to at home, then get it from the net once you're over there. If it's a lot of data, use encryption, and leave the decryption key at home. If they ask you to decrypt it, you can't, without the key. This is as opposed to using a password to protect a local copy of the key, which they apparently can get you to enter.

 

They do have the option to seize your device at the border too though. Not everyone has gotten it back.

 

Posted Image

+1 to that

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...

As for electronic border searches, the US is already doing this.

...

So is Australia. Over here, when you fill in the entry card, one question is whether you have pornographic material. Customs can (and often do) tell you to log into your laptop and will look through the porn you have to make sure it's not kiddy porn. At the moment, the search is limited to porn and they can't actually do anything about any pirated material, but that may change if ACTA gets signed and Australia decides to take a tough stance on piracy.

 

The lesson to be learned is to get rid of any porn on your laptop before you travel overseas and return to Australia. This way, if your laptop does get randomly searched, you'll be saved the embarrassment of having to go through your porn collection in front of a seedy old Customs officer.

 

I am glad that the EU is thinking of walking away and I certainly hope they do. Whilst I agree that the world IP regime needs to be modernised in some areas, some of the more draconian goals are definitely worth shelving.

 

It's about time that content developers realised that trying to stop illegal downloading is pointless. Even if we had full internet filtering, constant monitoring, etc. people would still find some way of subverting the technology, perhaps through encryption. They can't make encryption illegal - the banking and online shopping sectors would crack a major shit if any government tried to do that. Thus, there will always be a way of getting things illegally.

 

The trick is for the industry to realise how to capitalise on the internet. I think that iTunes is an excellent idea. I'd rather pay a relatively low price for a full-quality copy of a movie/song/TV show than pay nothing for a really shitty camcorder copy. I think that a lot of people are in the same boat and it's about time the industry realised this and capitalised on it instead of wasting money on law suits and copy protection measures that become useless within days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The trick is for the industry to realise how to capitalise on the internet. I think that iTunes is an excellent idea. I'd rather pay a relatively low price for a full-quality copy of a movie/song/TV show than pay nothing for a really shitty camcorder copy. I think that a lot of people are in the same boat and it's about time the industry realised this and capitalised on it instead of wasting money on law suits and copy protection measures that become useless within days.

I think ACTA is the industries last ditch effort to get ultimate control over distribution back. If they can get that, they don't need to offer low price. They can once again charge what they want.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The trick is for the industry to realise how to capitalise on the internet. I think that iTunes is an excellent idea. I'd rather pay a relatively low price for a full-quality copy of a movie/song/TV show than pay nothing for a really shitty camcorder copy. I think that a lot of people are in the same boat and it's about time the industry realised this and capitalised on it instead of wasting money on law suits and copy protection measures that become useless within days.

Pretty sure though that iTunes isn't full-quality though. I don't have iTunes, so correct me if I'm wrong here, but it's still compressed files that one buys on iTunes right? MP3's and such.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The trick is for the industry to realise how to capitalise on the internet. I think that iTunes is an excellent idea. I'd rather pay a relatively low price for a full-quality copy of a movie/song/TV show than pay nothing for a really shitty camcorder copy. I think that a lot of people are in the same boat and it's about time the industry realised this and capitalised on it instead of wasting money on law suits and copy protection measures that become useless within days.

Pretty sure though that iTunes isn't full-quality though. I don't have iTunes, so correct me if I'm wrong here, but it's still compressed files that one buys on iTunes right? MP3's and such.

 

Since iTunes Plus was introduced, I'm fairly sure it's all lossless, or at least very high bitrate lossy.

 

It's also all DRM free now, which is cool.

 

If it hasn't been completed yet, I can understand why it's being kept secret.

If it hasn't been completed yet, I can understand why it should be published.

until the details are agreed, leaks of draft documents will just feed new conspiracies to the tin foil hat brigade

 

For once, I agree with you.

 

Yeah, just like that data retention document that came out that was 90% redacted to "prevent premature and un-necessary debate".

 

The tinfoil hat brigade on Whirlpool are on it like a rash, and don't dare say you'll wait till the whole thing comes out to be outraged.

 

No use getting worked up over documents that aren't finished yet, IMO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://techdirt.com/articles/20100720/16420810292.shtml

 

EU Data Protection Body Points Out That ACTA Violates EU Data Protection Rules

from the no-legal-changes? dept

Hephaestus was the first of a few of you to point out that the EU advisory body in charge of making sure various European laws comply with EU data protection and privacy regulations has slammed ACTA for violating those rules and violating "fundamental" privacy rights. So much for the claims that ACTA won't go against EU law, huh? The report is pretty damning, and shows growing opposition across a wide spectrum of groups in the EU. And we're hearing growing protests in the US as well, even from groups that support stronger intellectual property. There are more and more indications that the farce that is ACTA may finally be starting to crumble.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

*BUMP*

 

Some good news for a change, no doubt they'll have other deviousness ready to go.

 

Link

 

July 4, 2012

 

The global Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA), arguably the most draconian internet control legislation penned thus far, has been overwhelmingly rejected by European lawmakers following months of protests and activism undertaken by thousands across the continent.

 

In January of this year, twenty-two of the 27 EU states joined other countries, including the United States and Japan, in signing on to ACTA. However, it has yet to be ratified anywhere and strong protests in Europe have caused other countries, such as Australia to delay consideration of the treaty.

 

In the past few months, the legislation has been dealt blow after blow with no less than five powerful EU committees, as well as member states, officially rejecting the treaty.

 

This morning, the European Parliament voted 478 against, 39 in favour, with 165 abstentions, effectively killing the legislation in its current form and ensuring for the first time that an international trade agreement cannot be ratified into law in the EU.

 

The EU Parliament released a statement pointing to the “unprecedented direct lobbying by thousands of EU citizens who called on it to reject ACTA, in street demonstrations, emails to MEPs and calls to their offices”. The statement also acknowledged a petition that had been signed by 2.8 million citizens urging them to reject the treaty.

 

Had it been ratified, ACTA would have allowed companies in China or any other country in the world to demand ISPs remove web content in the US and Europe with no legal oversight whatsoever.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×