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Master_Scythe

Warranty stickers: AUS valid?

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EU law dictates that a warranty cannot depend on a sticker or seal.

 

USA does not.

 

Do we fall under one of these, or do we have our own warranty law?

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as far as i can remember, a sticker cannot void a warranty unless there are no user serviceable parts inside.

 

however, having said that, stickers are commonly used to protect against DOA claims from someone who has opened up the product and had a poke around. In that case, the product is usually sent off to the manufacturer to inspect it before automatically issuing a DOA on the product.

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They will argue they were the terms and conditions of your purchase. EG acer or your local computer store.

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its caus im thnking of an MSI wind; MSI has said offcially; to add ram and change HDD's opening it is OK.

 

the 'older boxes' still have warranty stickers. Just in case i had to argue with stores, i was wondering the actual law.

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Ram and HDD are user replaceable parts

That's, er, very helpful.

 

Rob.

 

Which means there should not be a "break this seal and lose your warranty" sticker across the access coveres, and that even if there is it is within the customers right to add or replace those components without affecting warranty.

Of course this changes if the owner is hamfisted and jams the component in wrong breaking something, or the replacement component is at fault or causes a fault.

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mudg3 - Don't offer advice, if you don't know what you are talking about. Manufacturer's can't add terms and conditions to statutory warranty, that aren't allowed by the relevant legislation. Breaking such a sticker, doesn't necessarily mean that the Manufacturer is no longer required to honour the warranty. They may be forced to honour the warranty regardless.

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I know that TinBane But I know of places that will simply hang up the phone on you if you "break" there sticker by simply opening the computer that you've purchased from them. Acer does this on ALL there computers there are seals and stickers all over there hardware. Even as a warranty provider (me) you have to replace the stickers after replacing a part because you've broken the seal. Im not saying that's the law but some vendors do this.

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Which means there should not be a "break this seal and lose your warranty" sticker across the access coveres, and that even if there is it is within the customers right to add or replace those components without affecting warranty.

Of course this changes if the owner is hamfisted and jams the component in wrong breaking something, or the replacement component is at fault or causes a fault.

That's exactly what Juggs was saying, which left me rather confused as to why mudg3 posted a single sentence which everyone already knew and which was implicit in every post made so far. In hindsight I could've pointed it out in a more helpful manner, but twenty-twenty and all that jazz.

 

I can only guess, but I think Scythe didn't declare the thread "over" after Juggs post is because while an "as far as i can remember" is certainly helpful, it doesn't quite hit the level of "truthiness" he desired. Well, it didn't for me as an interested party.)

 

Rob.

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Yes after reading my posts I can certainly agree they were abit cryptic but If you could have pointed out what I said in a more helpful manner then why didn't you then?

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mudg3 - Don't offer advice, if you don't know what you are talking about. Manufacturer's can't add terms and conditions to statutory warranty, that aren't allowed by the relevant legislation. Breaking such a sticker, doesn't necessarily mean that the Manufacturer is no longer required to honour the warranty. They may be forced to honour the warranty regardless.

The statutory warranty, yes.

 

But the manufacturer is entitled to tie any additional/extended warranties to that sticker, since those are agreements between you and them.

Edited by SquallStrife

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I opened my ASUS A8JP to change the RAM and the warranty sticker which was attached the CPU heat sink just self-destructed into little bits. Laptop is out of warranty now anyway.

Edited by Jeruselem

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Warranties are complicated issues. Its amazing how many people think a warranty means they can run over something with their car and get a new one if it breaks.

 

To complicate things even more, any hardware sold by a reseller can have the manufacturer's warranty overwritten in some respect by the reseller's warranty, legal or not.

 

We're one of the few system builders who warranty our systems by component (3 yrs for MBs, 5 yrs for PSU, lifetime for memory, etc.). Most system builders will put a PSU with a 3-5 year warranty and memory with a lifetime warranty in a system and warranty the entire system for only 1 year.

 

Sometimes the retailer will wash their hands of the problem after their specified warranty period, and manufacturers will insist their warranty is only with the retailer, not a 3rd party (consumer). Very few consumers buy directly from the manufacturer, so they pretty much have you over a barrel in that situation. When does the warranty start.., when a consumer purchases it, or when the retailer purchases the item from the manufacturer? I know our manufacturers' warranties start at the time we purchase them from a supplier. So if they sit on a shelf for a year, that's one year less that the manufacturer will actually cover the component for our customers. This is why we don't keep much inventory and prefer to remain "custom".

 

Case in point: I'm currently replacing a PSU for a customer who purchased a system from another builder with an Antec SmartPower II PSU which has failed. The system was bought just over 2 years ago. The Antec PSU warranty is for 3 years. The builder gave a 1 year warranty on the system. When we pointed out to the customer that the PSU has a 3 year manufacturer's warranty, she relayed that information to the builder, who said she must go through Antec for that support. However this customer was told by Antec that they have no contract with her, as their contract was with the builder. She's now buying a Corsair PSU from us with a 5 year warranty that we'll support.

 

How often have you seen a component listed on a retail website with a 1 year warranty, but the manufacturer's website lists a 3 year warranty? Common sense dictates that you go through the retailer for the 1st year for warranty, and the manufacturer for the remaining 2 years. Some websites even state such. But that's not always how it works, regardless of what they state on their website. EG: Logitech insisted that I "only" contact them through the vendor where I bought their hardware from for a faulty mouse, but that retailer sent me several emails stating that I needed to contact Logitech. Then the retailer went out of business. After fighting with Logitech for several months I was finally allowed to send the faulty mouse back to them, and received a new mouse a couple months later still. I suspect most people would have given up for a $100 mouse, and next time I will too as it just wasn't worth the trouble.

 

The few times that we've purchased items for resale with stickers, we were informed that they were to give us an idea of whether someone had been poking inside or not, and what to look for if the seal had been broken. So I was under the impression that a broken seal is not a deal breaker, but more to alert us to potential tampering that would void the warranty. However I was informed by OCZ that if the seal on their PSU was broken, it would void the warranty, no if's, ands, or buts about it.

 

There are probably laws in place to make one (retailer) or the other (manufacturer) accountable, and I don't pretend to know the legalities of it all, but who can be bothered spending the time and/or money on a lawyer to sort it out?! Not I says me.

 

Bottom line is that if I were concerned about replacing components in a stickered system voiding the warranty, I'd be contacting the vendor themselves and asking them before making the purchase. Regardless of what the laws are, I'd want to know how they interpret them for my own peace of mind. :-)

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we were informed that they were to give us an idea of whether someone had been poking inside or not

That sounds reasonable.

 

I guess it's a good indicator of whether or not someone is lying when they say "It wasn't me!".

 

I also think it's more relevant when the device isn't user serviceable, like power supplies. Since there's no way the manufacturer's ass should be on the line if you've been dicking around inside a mains powered device.

Edited by SquallStrife

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I used to work in the mobile phone repair game. I'd have loved to have security seals on handsets, not to enable us to say "warranty void" straight away, but just to confirm if they'd been disassembled by a non-authorised service centre or end-user. Quite often it was fairly obvious, not in every case.

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Warranties are complicated issues. Its amazing how many people think a warranty means they can run over something with their car and get a new one if it breaks.

Yep seen similar, like a PC wanting warranty repairs when it was obvious the case had been dropped severely (out of square and a bloody big dent). Damaged HDD and broken CPU HSF.

But yes a lot of the problems probably stem from how complicated the whole thing is and how warranty claims processes seem to vary as much as the claims themselves.

It can be a right pain in the arse as a consumer or retailer trying to figure out exactly what the warranty covers etc.

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EU law dictates that a warranty cannot depend on a sticker or seal.

 

USA does not.

 

Do we fall under one of these, or do we have our own warranty law?

We are not bound by EU or USA laws WRT warranty. We are not in the European Union, nor are we a part of the United States of America.

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EU law dictates that a warranty cannot depend on a sticker or seal.

 

USA does not.

 

Do we fall under one of these, or do we have our own warranty law?

We are not bound by EU or USA laws WRT warranty. We are not in the European Union, nor are we a part of the United States of America.

 

I'm not sure its all that simple because the product may well be from EU, USA, or Japan, or China, and sold to retailers with the same warranty restrictions as the home country.

 

I'd forgotten about this one but EG: I'm a reseller for Crucial, and I deal directly with Crucial's home office in ID, USA. Never has Crucial stipulated to me that warranties vary in any way in Australia for their products. If the stickers (which state that the warranty is void if removed) are removed, the warranties are void. The modules have to be cleaned up before being returned too (no stickers from my company on them, original heatsinks must be intact, etc.).

 

If the product is made and sold in Australia, I can understand how only Australian laws would apply. But all these silly trade laws complicate issues more than most people realise. :-)

Edited by darklife41

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I'd forgotten about this one but EG: I'm a reseller for Crucial, and I deal directly with Crucial's home office in ID, USA. Never has Crucial stipulated to me that warranties vary in any way in Australia for their products. If the stickers (which state that the warranty is void if removed) are removed, the warranties are void. The modules have to be cleaned up before being returned too (no stickers from my company on them, original heatsinks must be intact, etc.).

The thing is, and please someone correct me if I'm wrong, a customers contract is with you, not Crucial. You must comply with the Australian laws about warranties, which seem to disregard "warranty void" stickers.

 

Rob.

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You must comply with the Australian laws about warranties, which seem to disregard "warranty void" stickers.

The statutory warranty, yes. It just says that the person who sells it needs to make sure it works, and will continue working for a 'reasonable' amount of time.

 

Anything else is in accordance with the fine print. If removing the sticker voids the manufacturer's 5-year next-day in-home replacement warranty, then so be it.

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You must comply with the Australian laws about warranties, which seem to disregard "warranty void" stickers.

The statutory warranty, yes. It just says that the person who sells it needs to make sure it works, and will continue working for a 'reasonable' amount of time.

 

Anything else is in accordance with the fine print. If removing the sticker voids the manufacturer's 5-year next-day in-home replacement warranty, then so be it.

 

Ah, that could very well be true, it makes sense.

 

But it still does mean that while Crucial might not accept a warranty claim under any circumstances due to a broken sticker, an Australian retailer might still be obliged to, right?

 

Rob.

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You must comply with the Australian laws about warranties, which seem to disregard "warranty void" stickers.

The statutory warranty, yes. It just says that the person who sells it needs to make sure it works, and will continue working for a 'reasonable' amount of time.

 

Anything else is in accordance with the fine print. If removing the sticker voids the manufacturer's 5-year next-day in-home replacement warranty, then so be it.

 

Ah, that could very well be true, it makes sense.

 

But it still does mean that while Crucial might not accept a warranty claim under any circumstances due to a broken sticker, an Australian retailer might still be obliged to, right?

 

Rob.

 

Correct-a-mundo.

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If the stickers (which state that the warranty is void if removed) are removed, the warranties are void.

Australian consumer laws apply.

 

 

If the product is made and sold in Australia, I can understand how only Australian laws would apply. But all these silly trade laws complicate issues more than most people realise. :-)

No, if it's sold in Australia, Australian consumer laws apply. Whether it's made here or not has fuckall to do with the equation.

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