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Jeff Spicoli

What Are You Cooking?

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Well,

 

All you are really trying to do with scones is have something that is quick to make, rather pleasant with strawberry jam and cream but really does need to be eaten fresh , they most certainly do not keep.

 

I'll eat them, not at all sure I can be bothered to make them.

 

Cinnamon rolls, though... Now you're talking  🙂

 

 

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Scones predate baking powder, and were originally baked on a stove, not in an oven.  I guess the definition is fairly flexible.

 

Whipped or clotted cream, and jam, is too much effort, tho'.  So I want something that tastes nice on its own, as well as with savoury or sweet condiments.

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Afternoon Cottage Garden Teas are all  the rage around here at the moment - have been for a while, warm scones, fresh home-made strawberry jam and clotted cream does make for a relaxing afternoon.

 

Another alternative might be Cheese Scones ?

 

Cheers

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I'm not really a massive fan of scones, but I did love them each time I visited Exeter, Devon.

Tea and fresh scones in the countryside, pretty damn tasty.

 

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🙂

 

That's rather close to my old home town, or rather where I grew up.

 

Indeed, it is some thing very English but the locals here do a good job of emulating it.

 

Cheers

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Lemongrass creme brulees turned out as well as I remembered.  Custard is set but not split, and with three layers of glazing, the caramel is firm without being burnt and only slightly grainy.  Next round I might go for a single glaze with a thicker layer.

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2 hours ago, Nich... said:

Lemongrass creme brulees turned out as well as I remembered.  Custard is set but not split, and with three layers of glazing, the caramel is firm without being burnt and only slightly grainy.  Next round I might go for a single glaze with a thicker layer.

 

is it like layers of a caramel directly on top of each other or with custard in between?  are you doing that with blowtorch? 

 

and what exactly does "splitting" mean?  i steam individual custards sometimes and if i overdo it the edges can get a bit hard and eggy — like that?

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31 minutes ago, @~thehung said:

 

is it like layers of a caramel directly on top of each other or with custard in between?  are you doing that with blowtorch? 

 

and what exactly does "splitting" mean?  i steam individual custards sometimes and if i overdo it the edges can get a bit hard and eggy — like that?

I haven't made any in a fair while, and my memory was that you can get a decent chunky layer of caramel by doing a thin layer of sugar, melt it with a blow torch, and then rinse repeat a few more times.  Which works, but the sugar isn't melting properly in successive layers, which isn't surprising because I was trying not to burn the lower layer.

And splitting as in the egg protein curdling because the custard got too hot.  It can give an eggy flavour, but more importantly it'll have a grainy texture.  I put this batch in the oven in small ramekins at 120, in a water bath, but in the past I've also just cooked the custard on a stovetop.  I'm not as big a fan of that way as the custard is too liquidy, usually.

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It's cool, but I kind of object to Stella characterising brown sugar as an imitation. 

Every couple of years I stumble upon a link to making it and end not up.

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Haven't made a brule in decades, a lot of effort and stress 🙂

 

However I never could make it work any other way but ramekins in a hot water tray, pretty certain it was the original recipe but could well be wrong.

 

Cheers

 

 

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Took about an hour longer than I expected, but some flan-style creme brulees turned out reasonable.  Using brown sugar for the caramel was a mistake.

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I do not know because I have never used brown sugar, but I am guessing it might sink, being bigger crystals.

 

Cheers

 

 

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18 minutes ago, chrisg said:

I do not know because I have never used brown sugar, but I am guessing it might sink, being bigger crystals.

 

Cheers

 

 

That's raw sugar, not brown sugar.

 

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The size of the crystals doesn't mean much once you melt them all.

 

A friend and I made ~6  batches of scones while I was in Sydney, testing various recipes including some that looked like they wouldn't work (they didn't work; the best bad batch looked like sweet yorkshire puddings, and probably could have worked as pancakes, tho', so that's something).  I think I found a recipe that gives me texture as well as flavour, but I'll need to try them again, now I'm home, to confirm.  But now right now because I'm a little scone'd out.

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Why so interested in scones ? I reckon damper is the go. Simple elegant and tasty

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I think if I were to set up a market stall, scones would be an easier sell than damper.  And it's not an either/or thing, just that there are so many bad scones out there and it's an easy way to see if anything else is worth buying (or not).

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I'm just about to begin making a Thai green curry. A god damn spicy as hell Thai green curry.

 

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25 minutes ago, twinair said:

I'm just about to begin making a Thai green curry. A god damn spicy as hell Thai green curry.

 

 

yep, they be spicy

 

i used to love the sweat, but now i settle for chicken panang which strikes me as green-lite; there's the slight burn and that aniseed edge that is just delicious

 

 

got some leftovers in the fridge for lunch, but then we did gozleme instead... maybe afternoon tea ?

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2 minutes ago, scruffy1 said:

 

yep, they be spicy

 

i used to love the sweat, but now i settle for chicken panang which strikes me as green-lite; there's the slight burn and that aniseed edge that is just delicious

 

 

got some leftovers in the fridge for lunch, but then we did gozleme instead... maybe afternoon tea ?

Gozleme is delicious.


As I am making this curry from scratch, even the paste...I get to control its fire and this fire be hot.
 

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i relented and ate some panang (presently glowing) and feel the need for seconds

 

i'm lazy in that i got it at the local thai restaurant, which is a very basic and unpretentious kitchen

 

 

yum ! 

 

 

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On 11/16/2019 at 12:42 PM, twinair said:

I'm just about to begin making a Thai green curry. A god damn spicy as hell Thai green curry.

 

 

Sinuses clear now?

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2 minutes ago, LogicprObe said:

 

Sinuses clear now?

Sinus and anus, clean as a whistle!

 

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