Jump to content
Can't remember your login details? Read more... ×
Sign in to follow this  
Director

Flouro tubes keep blowing?

Recommended Posts

OK so this is in a light fitting I have downstairs and nothing to do with computers. It's a 60cm flouro tube setup, the light stopped working the other day to I swapped out the tube and the starter, worked OK for about 20 minutes the *fitz* the new tube blew. hmm, that's strange, so I put another tube in and that went all *fittzy* as well and wont start.

 

I'm thinking the ballast is buggered and needs replacing, there is another lamp on the same circuit that still works OK so if if it were a problem with the switch you'd think that would play up as well, just after a second opinin before I replace the whole receptacle.

 

Cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It'd be 230V given that is AU standard.

I'd take a look at the ignitor, I know I had issues with one and once replaced it was fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll put money on a ballast (choke) issue.

The ballast serves two functions:

1. Provide the starting kick.

2. Limit the current to the proper value for the tube.

If theres an issue, it'll most likely be spiking the tube (blowing it) or the reverse- not supplying the initial kick to start the tube.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It'd be 230V given that is AU standard.

Yeah, because everyone's power in Australia is at 230VAC. Not. A few years ago my parents' electricity supply was down to about 185VAC.

 

 

I'd take a look at the ignitor, I know I had issues with one and once replaced it was fine.

He's already done that bit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It'd be 230V given that is AU standard.

Yeah, because everyone's power in Australia is at 230VAC. Not. A few years ago my parents' electricity supply was down to about 185VAC.

 

If you read what I said, I said it is the standard.

Not everyone can or does adhere to standards, but they do exist and that is the Australian one.

 

 

I'd take a look at the ignitor, I know I had issues with one and once replaced it was fine.

He's already done that bit.

I missed that part.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It'd be 230V given that is AU standard.

Yeah, because everyone's power in Australia is at 230VAC. Not. A few years ago my parents' electricity supply was down to about 185VAC.

 

If you read what I said, I said it is the standard.

 

And you also said that the voltage would be 230V because that's the standard. It's probably not 230V, and I reckon that's why the tubes are blowing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is true, but the light bulb itself would be made for the 230V standard, which is what my comment was based on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK getting 245v in (which is funny cos I only get 230v upstairs...but anyway) and only getting 71v out so I guess the ballast IS buggered?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've had several lighting specialists tell me to always replace the starter/ballast when you replace a tube.

They don't last forever and when they get tired the reduce the lifespan of the new tube.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK getting 245v in (which is funny cos I only get 230v upstairs...but anyway) and only getting 71v out so I guess the ballast IS buggered?

How does that compare to the good light?

 

 

I've had several lighting specialists tell me to always replace the starter/ballast when you replace a tube.

If that were the case, I can't see why the manufacturers would make the tubes replaceable. If you're replacing the ballast everytime you're replacing a tube, that could work out to be rather expensive.

 

 

OK getting 245v in (which is funny cos I only get 230v upstairs...but anyway) and only getting 71v out so I guess the ballast IS buggered?

After doing some reading, I'd say your ballast is buggered. The ballast regulates the current, if the current isn't regulated, the tube self destructs.

 

Linky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've had several lighting specialists tell me to always replace the starter/ballast when you replace a tube.

If that were the case, I can't see why the manufacturers would make the tubes replaceable. If you're replacing the ballast everytime you're replacing a tube, that could work out to be rather expensive.

 

 

Sorry My bad - I'm talking about the starter NOT the ballast.

You should replace the starter with each tube.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×