Jump to content
Hlass

Stealing geek's identity!

Getting rid of Asberger's?  

34 members have voted

  1. 1. ?

    • A good thing
      11
    • A bad thing
      6
    • Don't know
      3
    • Don't care
      14


Recommended Posts

Good idea. As a diagnostic category it was always a little bullshit and bears no difference from the less effected end of the Autism spectrum. Also it has this false label of savantism in the popular mind. But it did encourage a lot of people who where just a little socially fucked up to self diagnose, wear a disorder like a badge of honour and use it to explain away their behaviour, isolation and lack of achievement. And a lot of parents not to get Autism treatment for their kids because they had another label.

 

Proposed Autism Diagnosis Changes Anger ''Aspies''

 

 

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Published: February 17, 2010

 

 

 

CHICAGO (AP) -- In the autism world, ''Aspies'' are sometimes seen as the elites, the ones who are socially awkward, yet academically gifted and who embrace their quirkiness.

 

Now, many Aspies, a nickname for people with Asperger's syndrome, are upset over a proposal they see as an attack on their identity. Under proposed changes to the most widely used diagnostic manual of mental illness, Asperger's syndrome would no longer be a separate diagnosis.

 

Instead, Asperger's and other forms of autism would be lumped together in a single ''autism spectrum disorders'' category. Some parents say they'd welcome the change, thinking it would eliminate confusion over autism's variations and perhaps lead to better educational services for affected kids.

 

But opponents -- mostly older teens and adults with Asperger's -- disagree.

 

Liane Holliday Willey, a Michigan author and self-described Aspie whose daughter also has Asperger's, fears Asperger's kids will be stigmatized by the autism label -- or will go undiagnosed and get no services at all.

 

Grouping Aspies with people ''who have language delays, need more self-care and have lower IQs, how in the world are we going to rise to what we can do?'' Willey said.

 

Rebecca Rubinstein, 23, a graduate student from Massapequa, N.Y., says she ''vehemently'' opposes the proposal and will think of herself as someone with Asperger's no matter what.

 

Autism and Asperger's ''mean such different things,'' she said.

 

Yes and no.

 

Both are classified as neurodevelopmental disorders. Autism has long been considered a disorder that can range from mild to severe. Asperger's symptoms can vary, but the condition is generally thought of as a mild form and since 1994 has had a separate category in psychiatrists' diagnostic manual. Both autism and Asperger's involve poor social skills, repetitive behavior or interests, and problems communicating. But unlike classic autism, Asperger's does not typically involve delays in mental development or speech.

 

The American Psychiatric Association's proposed revisions, announced Wednesday, involve autism and several other conditions. The suggested autism changes are based on research advances since 1994 showing little difference between mild autism and Asperger's. Evidence also suggests that doctors use the term loosely and disagree on what it means, according to psychiatrists urging the revisions.

 

A new autism spectrum category recognizes that ''the symptoms of these disorders represent a continuum from mild to severe, rather than being distinct disorders,'' said Dr. Edwin Cook, a University of Illinois at Chicago autism researcher and member of the APA work group proposing the changes.

 

The proposed revisions are posted online at http://www.DSM5.org for public comment, which will influence whether they are adopted. Publication of the updated manual is planned for May 2013.

 

Dr. Mina Dulcan, child and adolescent psychiatry chief at Chicago's Children's Memorial Hospital, said Aspies' opposition ''is not really a medical question, it's an identity question.''

 

''It would be just like if you were a student at MIT. You might not want to be lumped with somebody in the community college,'' said Dulcan who supports the diagnostic change.

 

''One of the characteristics of people with Asperger's is that they're very resistant to change,'' Dulcan added. The change ''makes scientific sense. I'm sorry if it hurts people's feelings,'' she said.

 

Harold Doherty, a New Brunswick lawyer whose 13-year-old son has severe autism, opposes the proposed change for a different reason. He says the public perception of autism is skewed by success stories -- the high-functioning ''brainiac'' kids who thrive despite their disability.

 

Doherty says people don't want to think about children like his son, Conor, who will never be able to function on his own. The revision would only skew the perception further, leading doctors and researchers to focus more on mild forms, he said.

 

It's not clear whether the change would affect autistic kids' access to special services.

 

But Kelli Gibson of Battle Creek, Mich., whose four sons have different forms of autism, thinks it would. She says the revision could make services now designated just for kids with an ''autism'' diagnosis available to less severely affected kids -- including those with Asperger's and a variation called pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified.

 

Also, Gibson said, she'd no longer have to use four different terms to describe her boys.

 

''Hallelujah! Let's just put them all in the same category and be done with it,'' Gibson said.

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2010/02/17...-Diagnosis.html

Edited by hlass

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So my becomes autistic now? Yeah, I can see that being a huge help. Not.

 

Liane Holliday Willey, a Michigan author and self-described Aspie whose daughter also has Asperger's, fears Asperger's kids will be stigmatized by the autism label -- or will go undiagnosed and get no services at all.

I agree. Edited by 1shot1kill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone wanna summarize this for me because it sounds interesting, its just i have the bigggest head ache.

Edited by teffmyster

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So my becomes autistic now? Yeah, I can see that being a huge help. Not.

 

Liane Holliday Willey, a Michigan author and self-described Aspie whose daughter also has Asperger's, fears Asperger's kids will be stigmatized by the autism label -- or will go undiagnosed and get no services at all.

I agree.

 

 

What about the poor kids who are already "stigmatized by the autism label" cause they aren't special enough to have Asperger's? Improving the grade curve by getting the higher functioners in there to will help them and enable services to be more, not less focused..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So my becomes autistic now? Yeah, I can see that being a huge help. Not.

 

Liane Holliday Willey, a Michigan author and self-described Aspie whose daughter also has Asperger's, fears Asperger's kids will be stigmatized by the autism label -- or will go undiagnosed and get no services at all.

I agree.

 

 

What about the poor kids who are already "stigmatized by the autism label" cause they aren't special enough to have Asperger's?

 

Then they stay autistic. With these proposed changes, that won't change, they'll still be Autistic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As somebody diagnosed, I have to say that I feel quite indifferent about it- but then again I see it more as a useful tool and personality quirk than a disability.

 

To be honest, I doubt anybody would be stigmatised more than what they currently are- not kids or teenagers anyway. Kids pick on people because they're different, not because of the nature of their difference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As somebody diagnosed, I have to say that I feel quite indifferent about it- but then again I see it more as a useful tool and personality quirk than a disability.

I absolutely agree with you there, it doesn't make any difference on my personality what-so-ever.

 

Kids pick on people because they're different, not because of the nature of their difference.

Same here, I was picked on in High School because I was the odd one out, the quirky one, the bloke who never fit in, and many other identities that I was given during my time in High School.

 

I'm just glad that part of my life is closed.

 

And besides, in my personal opinion, everywhere I've been, society has become more accustomed to people living with asbergers, they've become more tolerant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So my becomes autistic now? Yeah, I can see that being a huge help. Not.

 

Liane Holliday Willey, a Michigan author and self-described Aspie whose daughter also has Asperger's, fears Asperger's kids will be stigmatized by the autism label -- or will go undiagnosed and get no services at all.

I agree.

 

 

What about the poor kids who are already "stigmatized by the autism label" cause they aren't special enough to have Asperger's?

 

Then they stay autistic. With these proposed changes, that won't change, they'll still be Autistic.

 

I suggest it will change their situation. As above.

 

Edited for 1shot

Edited by hlass

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So my becomes autistic now? Yeah, I can see that being a huge help. Not.

 

Liane Holliday Willey, a Michigan author and self-described Aspie whose daughter also has Asperger's, fears Asperger's kids will be stigmatized by the autism label -- or will go undiagnosed and get no services at all.

I agree.

 

 

What about the poor kids who are already "stigmatized by the autism label" cause they aren't special enough to have Asperger's?

 

Then they stay autistic. With these proposed changes, that won't change, they'll still be Autistic.

 

I suggest it will. As above.

 

So if they're not autistic, then what are they?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

all men have asperger's; it's simply a matter of degree

 

the women with it are just embracing a masculine tendency

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

# qualitative impairment in social interaction

# restricted, repetitive and stereotyped behaviors and interests

# significant impairment in important areas of functioning

 

You think all men have that? I don't.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

all men have asperger's; it's simply a matter of degree

 

the women with it are just embracing a masculine tendency

Fact, medical opinion or personal opinion?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

# qualitative impairment in social interaction

# restricted, repetitive and stereotyped behaviors and interests

# significant impairment in important areas of functioning

 

You think all men have that? I don't.

you should get out more :P

or talk to women who may view the descriptors differently to a man

 

all men have asperger's; it's simply a matter of degree

 

the women with it are just embracing a masculine tendency

Fact, medical opinion or personal opinion?

 

all 3, but mainly #3

 

the factors that define asperger's are really just the extreme bits of masculine tendency

the men are from mars, live in a cave, retire to the shed aspects

 

i don't think it's a disease, or a diagnosis for that matter

 

in milder forms, it's just men

 

the corollary to my opinion is all women have a mood disorder, and this is largely a hormonal thing

 

again, not meant to be derogatory or misogynistic, just observational

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the corollary to my opinion is all women have a mood disorder, and this is largely a hormonal thing

 

again, not meant to be derogatory or misogynistic, just observational

On this, at least, we can agree.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the corollary to my opinion is all women have a mood disorder, and this is largely a hormonal thing

 

again, not meant to be derogatory or misogynistic, just observational

On this, at least, we can agree.

 

then asperger's isn't a quantum leap to own

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So my becomes autistic now? Yeah, I can see that being a huge help. Not.

 

Liane Holliday Willey, a Michigan author and self-described Aspie whose daughter also has Asperger's, fears Asperger's kids will be stigmatized by the autism label -- or will go undiagnosed and get no services at all.

I agree.

 

So Pluto is not a planet now? Yeah, I can see that being a huge help. Not.

So dinosaurs and birds have a common ancestor now? Yeah, I can see that being a huge help. Not.

 

Newsflash, updating the DSM to reflect the last decade of scientific research will not change your child's condition. The fact is that all research on the biology and causes of Asperger's show that it is a specific variant within the autism spectrum and the boundary is quite arbitrary.

 

Aspie's don't like being redefined within a broad spectrum because one of the Asperger's symptoms is a view of themselves as a unique precious little flower. Ironically this is one of their common characteristics with other high function autistics, such as HFA and PDDNOS. As for their parents, well there is a genetic component after all.

 

 

the corollary to my opinion is all women have a mood disorder, and this is largely a hormonal thing

 

again, not meant to be derogatory or misogynistic, just observational

If you have an opinion backed up by zero facts and you have to tell people it's not derogatory or misogynistic then guess what, it is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have an opinion backed up by zero facts and you have to tell people it's not derogatory or misogynistic then guess what, it is.

Well, he didn't have to tell people that his opinion is not derogatory or misogynistic, so I guess it's not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have an opinion backed up by zero facts and you have to tell people it's not derogatory or misogynistic then guess what, it is.

Well, he didn't have to tell people that his opinion is not derogatory or misogynistic, so I guess it's not.

 

Wait, did I read somewhere that pedantry was being reclassified in the autism spectrum?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have an opinion backed up by zero facts and you have to tell people it's not derogatory or misogynistic then guess what, it is.

Well, he didn't have to tell people that his opinion is not derogatory or misogynistic, so I guess it's not.

 

Wait, did I read somewhere that pedantry was being reclassified in the autism spectrum?

 

How am I to know what you have and have not read? I know I'm fairly fucking clever, but I ain't a fucking psychic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have an opinion backed up by zero facts and you have to tell people it's not derogatory or misogynistic then guess what, it is.

Well, he didn't have to tell people that his opinion is not derogatory or misogynistic, so I guess it's not.

 

Wait, did I read somewhere that pedantry was being reclassified in the autism spectrum?

 

How am I to know what you have and have not read? I know I'm fairly fucking clever, but I ain't a fucking psychic.

 

On an unrelated note I wonder if posting a rhetorical question causes a massive conflict between the pedantic (mustn't answer) and entitled (must get the last word) parts of the autistic brain.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×