Jump to content
iamthemaxx

Now linux looks to be getting Steam

Recommended Posts

I really hope so, but from a market share point of view you have to wonder if they will bother.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd guess it'll be some form of wine with steam being a nice gui wrapper front end.

 

But the discussions on slashdot and other places seem to come to a consensus that this isn't much news. Steam offers linux versions of many dedicated servers, and this could just be a coder being a bit more thorough in their completeness than is necessary.

 

Also, the original story is from Phoronix, known for blowing up little things in to great news headlines :)

 

But, It'd be rad to be able to do all my games on linux.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hope not (.deb), tar would be nice as a bare minimum.

 

And I hope it is not a wine dress-up.

 

I have played HalfLife2 with wine, and it was OK, most of the time, but was a bit jumpy at times.,

 

This was only xmass time, so not that long ago.

 

But I never got CS:S to run.

 

I probably missed something.

 

Cheers, Glenn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hope not (.deb), tar would be nice as a bare minimum.

It would make no difference how they packaged it, you'd get precompiled binary blobs, since it's closed source software.

 

Video drivers demonstrate that precompiled binary blobs aren't the greatest of things.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Debs are a piece of piss to unpack:

 

$ ar x foo-1.2-3.deb
$ sudo tar -C / -xzvf data.tar.gz

Voila... contents of deb are now in your root FS. To uninstall, you just need to keep the .deb handy, and follow a similar process:

 

$ ar x foo-1.2-3.deb
$ tar -tzf data.tar.gz | ( cd /; sudo xargs rm -fv )

should do the trick.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hope not (.deb), tar would be nice as a bare minimum.

It would make no difference how they packaged it, you'd get precompiled binary blobs, since it's closed source software.

 

Video drivers demonstrate that precompiled binary blobs aren't the greatest of things.

 

 

I guess it could be sorta ok if they statically compile it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Video drivers demonstrate that precompiled binary blobs aren't the greatest of things.

I guess it could be sorta ok if they statically compile it.

In a way yes, but it'll be a nightmare to maintain... and I think you'd find some of the libs they'd want to link against, would have licenses that prohibit static linking against a proprietary module. So you'd have to keep it as a dynamically linked library in your app directory and tweak LD_LIBRARY_PATH.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really hope so, but from a market share point of view you have to wonder if they will bother.

If gaming vendors supported Linux, say goodbye to Windows, and Windows piracy. Hello terminal and community updates. :P

 

Linux has its issues, but I'd put up with them if it played games.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello terminal and community updates. :P

Supporting Linux doesn't mean open source everything.

 

Like we've said here, they will most likely deliver the games as binary blobs, which is not the best way to deliver Linux software.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like we've said here, they will most likely deliver the games as binary blobs, which is not the best way to deliver Linux software.

It's only not the best solution because of every jerkoff in town making their own distribution.

Edited by Linux_Inside V2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like we've said here, they will most likely deliver the games as binary blobs, which is not the best way to deliver Linux software.

It's only not the best solution because of every jerkoff in town making their own distribution.

 

But isn't that really what Linux is all about? ;P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like we've said here, they will most likely deliver the games as binary blobs, which is not the best way to deliver Linux software.

It's only not the best solution because of every jerkoff in town making their own distribution.

 

But isn't that really what Linux is all about? ;P

 

That all depends on who you ask

 

The splintered communtiy really isn't a good thing in some cases.

Edited by Linux_Inside V2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn´t even begin to try and do my own distro. Everything in Linux is Greek to me. more like Romulan actually, But I now have ubuntu 10.04 installed on my lappy, and Iḿ quite impressed, though it runs slower than XP SP2. This is my second attempt to try and learn Linux, lets hope it lasts longer than last time.

 

Sorry for hijacking. Iḿ looking forward to getting into trying some games.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The splintered communtiy really isn't a good thing in some cases.

That is something I thoroughly agree with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Isn't this a no brainer? In porting Source to openGL for the Mac isn't it rather trivial to then on port it to Linux? I'm interested in seeing how many people will ditch windows in favour of Linux on the hardware survey stats.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Isn't this a no brainer? In porting Source to openGL for the Mac isn't it rather trivial to then on port it to Linux? I'm interested in seeing how many people will ditch windows in favour of Linux on the hardware survey stats.

OSX and Linux are very different.

 

OSX has more in common with FreeBSD then Linux.

 

OpenGL is just one slice of the pie. There are scores of other APIs in use by the Source engine.

 

It has now been ported to Win32 and Cocoa. Linux's API is a whole other kettle of fish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doesn't Valve only need to "open the book" to the general public and let the community develop the software for them? That's kind of the whole idea behind open source. Every product on Steam would only need to make a demo version available so that the GNU/Linux community has a template to work from.

 

The only real delay here is the race for backend drivers and architecture to support better gaming on GNU/Linux distros.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steam and the Source engine aren't open source. They're strictly controlled closed-source apps. Source engine is full of intellectual property and trade secrets, they'd never open source it until well after its successor comes along.

 

The Linux desktop scene is too fractured to effectively develop decent games for these days. Writing for x different sound libraries, y different graphics libraries, z different glibc variations, kernel options, blah blah blah...

 

Waste of time and money for the minute percentage of people that don't have Windows or OS X.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×