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Coffee dilema

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My main problem with coffee in Adelaide is there is a metric fuck tonne of italian stuff laying about or bad arabica.

I hope you don't use the tap water.

 

This.

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My main problem with coffee in Adelaide is there is a metric fuck tonne of italian stuff laying about or bad arabica.

I hope you don't use the tap water.

 

This.

 

I don't mind Adelaide tap water for drinking because I grew up with it (it also varies hugely from area to area - I didn't like it at my grandparent place - different pipes and reservoir)

 

If I spend all this time and money on the machine and learning, I'll spend the extra $s and effort getting spring water or a water filter.

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My main problem with coffee in Adelaide is there is a metric fuck tonne of italian stuff laying about or bad arabica.

I hope you don't use the tap water.

 

This.

 

I don't mind Adelaide tap water for drinking because I grew up with it (it also varies hugely from area to area - I didn't like it at my grandparent place - different pipes and reservoir)

 

If I spend all this time and money on the machine and learning, I'll spend the extra $s and effort getting spring water or a water filter.

 

Do you have an expresso machine?

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Do you have an expresso machine?

Not yet, plunger and moka-pots only at the moment.

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Firstly, congrats on taking the step. The sooner we rid the world of instant coffee the better.

pfft. aint nothing wrong with instant.

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Ok, thanks everyone for the responses.

 

The path of buying a cheap machine from kmart and find out how it goes seems tempting, but if I struggle with it, get poor coffee and give up for that reason, then I haven't really tried it out right. While I think a talented Barrista can make good coffee with poor tools, I generally think good tools will help a beginner - I also loath buying with a planned upgrade - I prefer to hold off and save up, and in this case, budget is there.

 

It sounds like if the love of coffee is there, then the effort is applied, and people still stick to using them after a couple of months.

 

I think it might be time to go shopping in one weekend soon - This looks interesting and gets good reviews.

I basically think that paying up for a good machine is the way to go, but don't be afraid of the cheap machine. I can produce a better coffee, better than most cafes, on a factory second that cost $109 from the breville factory outlet, but ten years of practice helps me do that. Another thing to consider is that if you haven't made coffee much before, then it doesn't matter what machine you have because it will probably not be very good coffee. It will probably be bad for a while. Nothing to do but practice.

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Stubby nozzle releases hot water for tea.

 

How about pods? There are some cons, but they are tidy. You can make your own pods too, so you're not limited in choice of bean.

make your own pods?

 

do tell.

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The pod machines are good for their convenience. One of the people at work brought one along when things got busy ad we wanted a treat.

Not espresso machine/good cafe class IMO but very good.

I don't see a huge advantage in the pods. It takes bugger all time to grind beans, but the big disadvantage in my mind is variety. Walk into a good coffee shop and there may be 15 or 20 different varieties to try. You can go on a bit of a coffee journey if you can choose any variety you stumble across. While there are much better machines around, we went for a basic Breville and it's done the job over a number of years. We also have our own grinder which leaves us fee to choose any coffee we sample.

 

We will upgrade eventually, but the machine was a good first choice for us.

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The problem I have with grinding my own is that it's messy and painful.

 

The reason I'm heavily leaning to a pod machine is because a. I don't have to bugger about grinding the stuff and cleaning the table and grinder afterwards, b. I know the coffee should be reasonably fresh since it has been foil sealed since I got it - if I have to bugger about grinding my own it's likely to sit in a tin for a month before I get to grinding more and c. I don't want to have to mess with anything complicated in the machine. Being able to stick a pod in a slot and push a button appeals to me for its simplicity.

 

Add this to the fact that all decent coffee pretty much tastes the same to me and the pods look like a good option. I couldn't tell the difference between arabica and whatever else there is. The only time I can taste a difference is between instant and other coffee. I certainly couldn't tell you the difference between the various coffees in Gloria Jeans or whatever.

Edited by Chaos.Lady

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The problem I have with grinding my own is that it's messy and painful.

 

The reason I'm heavily leaning to a pod machine is because a. I don't have to bugger about grinding the stuff and cleaning the table and grinder afterwards,

um...WTF? :D

 

Posted Image

 

doing it wrong?

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I have a crappy Sunbeam manual jobby now and had a much crappier DeLonghi automatic one before that. Auto sucks quite frankly - I haven't had a real good coffee from one of those ever. I say the Sunbeam is crappy only because it is limited in what it can achieve despite me getting a Barista course book and learning how to do everything properly. With the help of the book I'm producing the best I can get out of this machine but I've surpassed it with my leet coffee skillz :)

 

So my next machine will be a manual jobby with a proper tank system which develops good constant pressure and has the right group head and basket design for the skillz to make a real difference. There's so much to go wrong, as I found out when I read the book and ways you can tell it went wrong like timing the draw.

 

Oh and yes - it gets used once a day to produce a near perfect cappuccino for me and the missus.

 

You also have to consider a good burr grinder which can produce a consistent fine grind and grind your beans just before you make the coffee.

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The secret to a great coffee at home are the beans.

 

Buy them whole from a local roaster. 100% arabica is preferred. The beans will be perfect for grinding two weeks after roasting. Get to know your local roaster - a good one will have a "roasted on" date. Do not buy them from a supermarket - they are all old and stale.

 

Grind your beans on demand. A conical burr grinder is the only way to grind coffee beans. Cheaper grinders have blades that pulverise the beans, not good. A conical burr grinder has two plates that massage and crush the beans, helping them to release their oils, which means extra flavour and added crema to your shot.

 

I believe that the most one should spend on a home system is $800. This includes the machine and a decent grind-on-demand conical burr grinder.

 

The real difference in the quality of the coffee between a home $200 semi-auto machine and a home semi-auto $2000 machine is very little. If the operator of both machines uses freshly roasted, quality grind-on-demand beans that they like, and has had a lot of trial and error/practice on the machine, then the end result will be similar. And on a par with coffee from the best cafes.

 

It is the expertise and coffee knowledge of the operator that makes a great coffee.

 

And there the satisfaction lies.

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The problem I have with grinding my own is that it's messy and painful.

Messy and painful?

 

We have a similar one to this. You dial up how many cups you want to grind for, bush a button and it's done. Yes, there is a container that holds the ground coffee that you will need to clean, but it's hardly a big deal. If your only grinding for one person, you can grind for a number of cups and just keep it in a jar.

 

I don't really see that it creates much more mess, and it doesn't limit you to what's available in pods. There is also a question of the freshness of the beans.

 

We did try coffee from pods but preferred the results from a 'regular' coffee machine.

Edited by Mac Dude

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I believe that the most one should spend on a home system is $800. This includes the machine and a decent grind-on-demand conical burr grinder.

 

The real difference in the quality of the coffee between a home $200 semi-auto machine and a home semi-auto $2000 machine is very little.

 

It also comes down to if you want a double boiler or mass around with a single, and then if you want it plumbed in or have to fill the water bottle all the time.

 

Its hard to find a $800 machine that will do all that.

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I believe that the most one should spend on a home system is $800. This includes the machine and a decent grind-on-demand conical burr grinder.

 

The real difference in the quality of the coffee between a home $200 semi-auto machine and a home semi-auto $2000 machine is very little. If the operator of both machines uses freshly roasted, quality grind-on-demand beans that they like, and has had a lot of trial and error/practice on the machine,

I don't doubt that the lion's share of improvement in coffee comes from beans, freshness and skill, but it seems from reading around that If I'm to go semi-automatic, then a dual boiler or heat exchanger system is highly desirable to be able to produce steam and coffee at the same time.

 

I haven't found one of those for under about $1500 (there are some cheaper dual thermoblock systems but I'm unconvinced they offer the performance and long life)

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I don't doubt that the lion's share of improvement in coffee comes from beans, freshness and skill, but it seems from reading around that If I'm to go semi-automatic, then a dual boiler or heat exchanger system is highly desirable to be able to produce steam and coffee at the same time.

 

I haven't found one of those for under about $1500 (there are some cheaper dual thermoblock systems but I'm unconvinced they offer the performance and long life)

WIN

 

I have been very happy with it.

 

Then save for a decent burr grinder.

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Stubby nozzle releases hot water for tea.

 

How about pods? There are some cons, but they are tidy. You can make your own pods too, so you're not limited in choice of bean.

make your own pods?

 

do tell.

 

Google diy pods. There is a little device that can make the pods, and I also found a page that just uses a scoop and a tamp.

 

There is something else that needs considering in this whole thing, pressurised portafilters. Nearly every machine under $800 or so has a pressurised portafilter to produce consistent crema under any conditions. Tamp and grind become almost unnecessary to think about. Finding a bean that works well with the machine and doesnt taste overly bitter becomes more important than using good quality coffee. You cant experiment with the coffee much, and if you drink primarily espresso or coffee without milk, then you dont get much choice. You can buy non pressurised portafilters or perhaps mod a filter, but the machines are usually made to work with pressurised filters. Too much water, too fast, not enough pressure. Some of the cheaper Saeco machines have decent pumps and they can work well with aftermarket non pressurised portafilters, and Saeco stock portafilters can easily be modified anyway. The long and the short of it is that with pressurised filters, espressos are always average, and there is little you can do to improve it. I dont know from having seen inside an auto machine, but I think its safe to assume that every machine would have a pressurised filter.

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WIN

 

I have been very happy with it.

 

Then save for a decent burr grinder.

Hmmm. Pretty much a successor to the aforementioned crappy Sunbeam I have. I must say in it's defence - it does last a bloody long time. Second hand when I got it years ago and still going. I guess I'm being a little precious!?

 

Oh and ffs don't go anywhere near anything with aluminium fittings. Whether you believe in the aluminium - altzheimers link or not pumping hot acidic liquid through aluminium is making sure you'll be a guinea pig in the whole theory.

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Oh and ffs don't go anywhere near anything with aluminium fittings. Whether you believe in the aluminium - altzheimers link or not pumping hot acidic liquid through aluminium is making sure you'll be a guinea pig in the whole theory.

I've been drinking out of the soft metal for years and theirs is nothing wrong with maybe if you jiggle it to the left as little it will fit

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I've been drinking out of the soft metal for years and theirs is nothing wrong with maybe if you jiggle it to the left as little it will fit

BWAHAHAHAHAHA....that explains a lot!

 

anyone used one of these? I like the cyberpunk factor, but wonder what the maintenance would be like....

 

<pretty pic>

That's for smoking pot silly! All this time you've been thinking it's coffee that gives you the munchies :)

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anyone used one of these? I like the cyberpunk factor, but wonder what the maintenance would be like....

 

from this joint:

http://www.coffeecraft.com.au/itemdetailspage/3541

I love the video of that. Don't care what the coffee tastes like, it'd be a talking point watching it brew :)

 

But I think I'll go for espresso style machine. Will go shopping on saturday, and see what the shop says about this - or what the recommend as an alternative.

Posted Image

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