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What is the worst instance of poverty you've seen in real life?

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What is the worst instance of poverty you've witnessed in the world? Strictly in person, so seeing it on TV, the net or reading about it don't count.

 

Mine was in Cambodia a year or a half ago, where it came in several forms. In the tourist districts of the main cities, the worst I saw was beggars, sometimes malnourished, mentally ill or disabled. In the outskirts of the city, there were lots of people living in really, really poor shacks. And in the countryside, I visited one village where the people mostly survived on one meal a day, which they could sustain with tourism dollars and the very rare and hard-earned donation.

 

Not the worst poverty in Cambodia by any means, but just my direct experience of it.

 

And you?

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Bali, 2004. Sitting in a small (8 seater) van driving up to a volcano. Heaps of coaches, full of (mostly) Western tourists. And there, right beside the road, is a smallholding, complete with a grass hut (with dirt floor) and a toddler wearing a shirt. Poverty? That's the closest that I've come, and I grew up dirt poor, taking molasses sandwiches to school.

 

In the tourist districts of the main cities, the worst I saw was beggars, sometimes malnourished, mentally ill or disabled.

I've heard that it's quite common for such beggars to only appear to be so, but not actually so.

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In the tourist districts of the main cities, the worst I saw was beggars, sometimes malnourished, mentally ill or disabled.

I've heard that it's quite common for such beggars to only appear to be so, but not actually so.

 

True and it's pretty shocking the lengths people will go to fake it, or have others fake it on their behalf.

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I was in the philippines, the capital city Manila,

 

I was in a popular street for going out and other night times activities.

 

anyway i was walking up the street with afew friends and two young kids aged about 10 were naked with there hands out for money while next to them were homeless people sleeping under umbrellas

MEAN WHILE everyone was walking past without a second look... there was nothing i could do.

 

Also in the rural areas all the dogs a near death and look like walking skeletons, full grow adult cats look like kittens... that country has enormous problems that only 100years of time could fix.

 

If you haven't traveled to Manila then I would count your lucky stars that Australia is the way it is.

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Bali for me too for direct contact.

 

Although they have a relatively strong community system so starvation and shelter aren't massive problems there, just much lower standards of living than here.

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I most likely saw worse examples of poverty in India, but the most affecting was a young kid begging on the street for food with this eloquent Indian gesture, and crying.

 

Fortunately, I was walking out of a restaurant at the time with a doggy bag in my hand, and presented it in an instant... the look on his face was gold : )

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Are they any worse off than us?

Uhm.. yes.

 

How so?

 

 

I most likely saw worse examples of poverty in India, but the most affecting was a young kid begging on the street for food with this eloquent Indian gesture, and crying.

 

Fortunately, I was walking out of a restaurant at the time with a doggy bag in my hand, and presented it in an instant... the look on his face was gold : )

Largely, such beggars go to work purely because of people like you.

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I most likely saw worse examples of poverty in India, but the most affecting was a young kid begging on the street for food with this eloquent Indian gesture, and crying.

 

Fortunately, I was walking out of a restaurant at the time with a doggy bag in my hand, and presented it in an instant... the look on his face was gold : )

Largely, such beggars go to work purely because of people like you.

 

It's nice when it's so easy to rationalise away their suffering, isn't it?

 

It only takes a glance at India's per-capita PPP GDP to start the illusion shattering.

 

Rob.

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I most likely saw worse examples of poverty in India, but the most affecting was a young kid begging on the street for food with this eloquent Indian gesture, and crying.

 

Fortunately, I was walking out of a restaurant at the time with a doggy bag in my hand, and presented it in an instant... the look on his face was gold : )

Largely, such beggars go to work purely because of people like you.

 

It's nice when it's so easy to rationalise away their suffering, isn't it?
Rationalise their suffering? Why would I bother with that? Are they worse off than us? Are we better off than they?

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Rationalise their suffering? Why would I bother with that? Are they worse off than us? Are we better off than they?

How do you define "better off"?

 

Rob.

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Rationalise their suffering? Why would I bother with that? Are they worse off than us? Are we better off than they?

How do you define "better off"?

 

Rob.

 

I don't define it.

 

Are they any worse off than us?

Uhm.. yes.
How so?
Materially.

 

And really, is that what counts? How about spiritually?

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Are they any worse off than us?

Uhm.. yes.

 

How so?

 

 

I most likely saw worse examples of poverty in India, but the most affecting was a young kid begging on the street for food with this eloquent Indian gesture, and crying.

 

Fortunately, I was walking out of a restaurant at the time with a doggy bag in my hand, and presented it in an instant... the look on his face was gold : )

Largely, such beggars go to work purely because of people like you.

 

 

Well, if you judge well-being on how much one is suffering, then anyone who experiences limited access to food, shelter, water and other basic comforts is pretty easily argued as being worse off than your average Australian.

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Rationalise their suffering? Why would I bother with that? Are they worse off than us? Are we better off than they?

How do you define "better off"?

 

Rob.

 

I don't define it.

 

Heh, good thinking.

 

Rob.

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Are they any worse off than us?

Uhm.. yes.

 

How so?

 

 

I most likely saw worse examples of poverty in India, but the most affecting was a young kid begging on the street for food with this eloquent Indian gesture, and crying.

 

Fortunately, I was walking out of a restaurant at the time with a doggy bag in my hand, and presented it in an instant... the look on his face was gold : )

Largely, such beggars go to work purely because of people like you.

 

 

Well, if you judge well-being on how much one is suffering, then anyone who experiences limited access to food, shelter, water and other basic comforts is pretty easily argued as being worse off than your average Australian.

 

But average Australians have limited access to food, shelter, water and other basic comforts.

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Kid was hungry, I gave him food. No skin off my nose, made two people happy.

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Well, if you judge well-being on how much one is suffering, then anyone who experiences limited access to food, shelter, water and other basic comforts is pretty easily argued as being worse off than your average Australian.

Trust me when I say, don't bother :P

 

There are too many intelligent and engaging people with whom a discussion will be enlightening here, so there's no real need to bother with 1shot's useless pedantry.

 

Rob.

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Kid was hungry, I gave him food. No skin off my nose, made two people happy.

That's not a bad thing. It's why I give the odd dollar to street beggars here in Australia. It makes them feel good, it makes me feel better.

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Spirituality only makes up a part of what a person feels/experiences in their lifetime. Sure, it might be more significant for some people, but for many others it becomes rather meaningless when the basics of health and comfort aren't there.

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Spirituality only makes up a part of what a person feels/experiences in their lifetime. Sure, it might be more significant for some people, but for many others it becomes rather meaningless when the basics of health and comfort aren't there.

So poor people don't have the basics of health and comfort? What are the basics of health and comfort?

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Are they any worse off than us?

Uhm.. yes.

 

How so?

 

 

I most likely saw worse examples of poverty in India, but the most affecting was a young kid begging on the street for food with this eloquent Indian gesture, and crying.

 

Fortunately, I was walking out of a restaurant at the time with a doggy bag in my hand, and presented it in an instant... the look on his face was gold : )

Largely, such beggars go to work purely because of people like you.

 

 

Well, if you judge well-being on how much one is suffering, then anyone who experiences limited access to food, shelter, water and other basic comforts is pretty easily argued as being worse off than your average Australian.

 

But average Australians have limited access to food, shelter, water and other basic comforts.

 

 

But in comparison to the average subject of poverty we've raised here, they have a lot more. Therefore, we're better off.

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