Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
krispy89

Seven Keys to rule us all.

Recommended Posts

Seven smartcards to rule us all as internet 'keys' handed out across the globe By Peter Farquhar, Technology Editor From: news.com.au July 29, 2010 7:57AM.

IT'S a scenario that doesn't bear thinking about - what happens if the internet breaks?

Fans of The IT Crowd will recall the moment when Jen drops "the internet", a black box given to her as a prank by her colleagues to present at a management show-and-tell.

 

Chaos ensues and the internet is trampled in the rush to prepare for the Apocalypse.

 

But really, is the internet so fragile that it can be switched on and off at will?

 

Yes, apparently.

 

The BBC is reporting the existence of seven individuals who were recently given the "keys" to the internet.

 

If it breaks, such as in the event of a global cyber attack, at least five of these seven people will be required to take their keys - actually smartcards - to a base in the US to boot it all up again.

 

And they'll have to come from all over the world, with each guardian hailing from a different country.

 

Represented are the United States, Trinidad and Tobago, China, the UK, Canada and the Czech Republic - even Burkina Faso gets one.

 

Explaining why and how these seven people can save our digital lives is a bit tedious and involves lots of acronyms.

 

Suffice to say that the internet is joined together by a security scheme known as the Domain Name System Security (DNSS), which protects the integrity of website addresses and makes sure you get the right one when you type it in and hit the return key.

 

If the entire internet looks like it might be under cyber attack on a global scale, the DNSS will cut the connections from all the major servers and retreat back into a kind of digital panic room.

 

And it won't come out until the cyber guardians enter their smartcards together.

 

The BBC actually tracked the UK's representative, Paul Kane, down for a chat about what it feels like to be responsible for kickstarting the machine that runs the modern world.

 

Described simply as an "entrepreneur", Mr Kane is based at the University of Bath and can now add the title of Trusted Community Representative to his CV.

 

He told the BBC he was "honoured and excited to be recognised for past achievements and current contributions to global internet security".

 

Mr Kane's not exactly being circumspect about his enormous new responsibility - he also spoke to New Scientist, telling them he'll be holding the smartcard "in a tamper-proof bag in a secure deposit box".

 

The US will be represented by security researcher Dan Kaminsky, famous for finding a fatal flaw in the DNS protocol then having his personal email hacked and published by Zero for 0wned hackers.

 

Now the search is on for the other five, who so far have been smart enough to keep their mouths shut - if only because they don't want to be characters in the next Dan Brown novel.

Personally I like the idea that the Internet can be started back up in case if a disaster or something else. But what happens if these 'keys' are stolen, damaged or destroyed?

 

And I think I know why Australia isn't on the list of countries to get a 'key'. Conroy.

 

EDIT: Source

Edited by krispy89

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally I like the idea that the Internet can be started back up in case if a disaster or something else. But what happens if these 'keys' are stolen, damaged or destroyed?

 

EDIT: Source

It says in the article any 5 will do, and it would be silly not to have them replicatable, but still. It's a hollywood movie waiting to happen. It will probably star Harrison Ford

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can't turn "the internet" on and off. Anyone who thinks otherwise doesn't know how it works.

You can turn off random servers and ISPs etc...but as a whole, it is impossible to kill the entire internet with one fell swoop

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally I like the idea that the Internet can be started back up in case if a disaster or something else. But what happens if these 'keys' are stolen, damaged or destroyed?

 

EDIT: Source

It says in the article any 5 will do, and it would be silly not to have them replicatable, but still. It's a hollywood movie waiting to happen. It will probably star Harrison Ford

 

nah, Sam Neill would be a better choice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it breaks, such as in the event of a global cyber attack, at least five of these seven people will be required to take their keys - actually smartcards - to a base in the US to boot it all up again.

Kinds sounds familiar: http://tinyurl.com/26kxnt2

 

That and global cyber attack = another false flag attack giving them all the justification they need to put all the 'security' measures they like on the intertubes. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can't turn "the internet" on and off. Anyone who thinks otherwise doesn't know how it works.

You can turn off random servers and ISPs etc...but as a whole, it is impossible to kill the entire internet with one fell swoop

I bet the POTUS could do it with an Executive Order.

 

but yeah, it'd have to be a coordinated and complete shutdown to have much effect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a hollywood movie waiting to happen. It will probably star Harrison Ford.

Nah ... Bruce Willis. Live Freer or Die Harder than Ever Before ... Again. I think it's a sequel of some kind.

 

Wow. The big Interwebz headquarters base is here in the US ... and these five guardians actually have to pass through customs to get to it. We are sooo doomed if Google breaks again.

 

Actually, maybe it's a fake base and the real one is stationed secretly in somebody's office.

Posted Image"No it isn't."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can't turn "the internet" on and off. Anyone who thinks otherwise doesn't know how it works.

You can turn off random servers and ISPs etc...but as a whole, it is impossible to kill the entire internet with one fell swoop

+1

 

I don't know WTF they are on about.

 

Rob.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can't turn "the internet" on and off. Anyone who thinks otherwise doesn't know how it works.

You can turn off random servers and ISPs etc...but as a whole, it is impossible to kill the entire internet with one fell swoop

+1

 

I don't know WTF they are on about.

 

Rob.

 

 

Yah, I'm reading this wonder WTF they're on about. It doesn't work that way. :/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can't turn "the internet" on and off. Anyone who thinks otherwise doesn't know how it works.

You can turn off random servers and ISPs etc...but as a whole, it is impossible to kill the entire internet with one fell swoop

+1

 

I don't know WTF they are on about.

 

Rob.

 

I think what's happened here is that information has leaked about the internet being controlled at Area 51.

No wonder they won't let anyone near the joint!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah ok, a bit more of the truth:

 

ICANN appoints Paul M Kane, CEO, CommunityDNS, as one of seven Trusted Community Representatives ("TCR") from the global community, holding two identical smart cards safeguarding the encrypted cryptographic fragment of the Recovery Key for the DNSSEC signing Key used to sign the ROOT Zone.

http://www.cdns.net/key-signing.html

 

Interesting, but a far cry from what the article in the OP suggests.

 

Rob.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just looking at krispy's avatar...looks like he is the key hole to the world wide web.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is certainly possible to pull the large corporate arms of the web into disarray through serious DNS abuse. That would be what they are referring to.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is certainly possible to pull the large corporate arms of the web into disarray through serious DNS abuse. That would be what they are referring to.

Do you think that justifies:

 

But really, is the internet so fragile that it can be switched on and off at will?

 

Yes, apparently.

?? :P

 

Rob.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can't turn "the internet" on and off. Anyone who thinks otherwise doesn't know how it works.

You can turn off random servers and ISPs etc...but as a whole, it is impossible to kill the entire internet with one fell swoop

Exactly, and I'm assuming the "keys" are for DNS, which would significantly hamper the way resources are accessed, but not "kill" the internet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This comes along as the US government give itself the power to kill it's internet connection, my inner conspricist is aroused.

 

Even I know the net can't be turned off and I know fuck all about networking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One Key to rule them all, One Key to find them,

One Key to bring them all and in the darkness bind them

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wasn't there something in atomic about how there are only 13 root name servers in the world?

Don't know, but it is true. And these keys are to enable these root servers from what I gather in case they are attacked and have to be disabled to prevent malicious activity, e.g. taking control over a root server and mapping names to different machines.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Headsup.

 

http://www.prisonplanet.com/false-flag-cyb...e-internet.html

 

An increasing clamour to restrict and control the internet on behalf of the government, the Pentagon, the intelligence community and their private corporate arms, could result in a staged cyber attack being used as justification.

 

Over recent months we have seen a great increase in media coverage of inflated fears over a possible “electronic Pearl Harbor” event, with reports claiming that the U.S. could be “felled within 15 minutes”.

 

Vastly over-hyped (and in some cases completely asinine) claims that the power grids and other key infrastructure such as rail networks and water sources are wired up to the public internet have permeated such coverage.

 

Threats against computer networks in the United States are grossly exaggerated. Dire reports issued by the Defense Science Board and the Center for Strategic and International Studies “are usually richer in vivid metaphor — with fears of ‘digital Pearl Harbors’ and ‘cyber-Katrinas’ — than in factual foundation,” writes Evgeny Morozov, a respected researcher and blogger who writes on the political effects of the internet.

 

Morozov notes that much of the data on the supposed cyber threat “are gathered by ultra-secretive government agencies — which need to justify their own existence — and cyber-security companies — which derive commercial benefits from popular anxiety.”

 

When the Cybersecurity Act was introduced by Senator John Rockefeller last year, he made similar claims about the threat of cyber attacks, adding “Would it have been better if we’d have never invented the Internet?”. Rockefeller’s legislation gives the president the ability to “declare a cybersecurity emergency” and shut down or limit Internet traffic in any “critical” information network “in the interest of national security.” The bill does not define a critical information network or a cybersecurity emergency. That definition would be left to the president, according to a Mother Jones report.

 

Provisions in the bill would allow the federal government, via the DHS and the NSA, to tap into any digital aspect of every citizen’s information without a warrant. Banking, business and medical records would be wide open to inspection, as well as personal instant message and e mail communications – all in the name of heading off cyber attacks on the nation.

 

Enhancements of such provisions are contained in the more recent “Protecting Cyberspace as a National Asset Act”, which is being pushed hard by Senator Joe Lieberman. The bill would hand absolute power to the federal government to close down networks, and block incoming Internet traffic from certain countries under a declared national emergency.

 

An accompanying cybersecurity control grid would only create greater risk according to experts who note that it would essentially “establish a path for the bad guys to skip down.” Other countries, such as Australia and the UK are following suit.

 

The program dovetails with the Pentagon’s newly created Cyber Command, headed by Keith B Alexander, the acting head of the NSA and the man behind the massive program of illegal dragnet surveillance of domestic communications since at least 2001.

 

During the Senate Armed Services Committee confirmation hearing, Alexander said the Pentagon’s Cyber Command would enjoy “significant synergy” with the NSA. “We have to show what we’re doing to ensure that we comport, comply with the laws,” said Alexander, perversely claiming the agency is respecting and protecting the privacy of the American people.

 

The Pentagon considers cyberspace a warfighting domain equal to land, sea, air and space. In 2003, the Pentagon classified the internet as an enemy “weapons system” requiring a “robust offensive suite of capabilities to include full-range electronic and computer network attack.” It has spent Billions of dollars building a super secret “National Cyber Range” in order to prepare for “Dominant Cyber Offensive Engagement”, which translates as control over “any and all” computers. The program has been dubbed “The Electronic Manhattan Project”.

 

The enemy is never specifically named, it is merely whoever uses the net, because the enemy IS the net. The enemy is the freedom the net provides to billions around the globe and the threat to militaristic dominance of information and the ultimate power that affords.

 

These initiatives represent a continuation of the so called “Comprehensive National Cybersecurity Initiative”, created via a secret presidential order in 2008 under the Bush administration. former National Intelligence Director Mike McConnell announced that the NSA’s warrantless wiretaps would “be a walk in the park compared to this,”.

 

“This is going to be a goat rope on the Hill” McConnell said. My prediction is that we’re going to screw around with this until something horrendous happens.”

 

As we have previously reported, large corporations such as Google, AT&T, Facebook and Yahoo to name but a few are intimately involved in the overarching program. Those corporations have specific government arms that are supplying the software, hardware and tech support to US intelligence agencies in the process of creating a vast closed source database for global spy networks to share information.

 

 

 

In 2008 Stanford Law professor Lawrence Lessig detailed such ongoing government plans for overhaul and restriction.

 

Lessig told attendees of a high profile Tech conference that “There’s going to be an i-9/11 event” which will act as a catalyst for a radical reworking of the law pertaining to the internet.

 

Lessig said that he came to that conclusion following a conversation with former government Counter Terrorism Czar Richard Clarke, who informed him that there is already in existence a cyber equivalent of the Patriot Act, an “i-Patriot Act” if you will, and that the Justice Department is just waiting for a cyber terrorism event in order to implement its provisions.

 

Lessig is the founder of Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society. He is founding board member of Creative Commons and is a board member of the Software Freedom Law Center. He is best known as a proponent of reduced legal restrictions on copyright, trademark and radio frequency spectrum, particularly in technology applications.

 

These are clearly not the ravings of some paranoid cyber geek.

 

More at the link.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know what everyone is talking about. The internet is a little black box that is wireless. Ask Jen.

Edited by Mills

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know what everyone is talking about. The internet is a little black box that is wireless. Ask Jen.

<3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From what I have read here: http://searchsecurity.techtarget.com.au/ne...nternet-servers

 

It looks like you can't actually shutdown the internet, but you could stop it from working. It depends if they put in a kill code in the DNSSEC I suppose. Well that's too harsh. Perhaps a web lock out function. Freezing the internet until the threat can be determined/halted/destroyed. Now that all internet servers use the standard, it could be used to take down the internet in the face of a massive cyber-attack threat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×