Jump to content
Morgoth

LAMS Approved road bikes

Recommended Posts

Hey all, I don't General Chat post much these days, but I'd like some advice from some people who aren't G-unit donned, Braaap obsessed, Monster jersey while not riding kinda people. (nothing personal :P )

 

I'm 22, ride a quad bike offroad as my hobby, outside of work.

 

I've been thinking of going for my Roadbike L's, I'll do some courses and get familiar with these two-wheelie bikes for tarmac before I get there though.

 

For those not informed, Australia has a list of approved bikes for learners. called LAMS (Learner Approved Motorcycle Scheme)

 

Considering it makes sense to upgrade bikes after you're no longer restricted, there's not much point blowing out the budget on one of these, but I need to look ahead and see what one could stand having for a few years until I can ride what I like without copping a fine.

 

The lists are essentially the same in each state as far as I can tell, but I'm not much of an expert on road bikes.

 

So any atomicans have some insight into a good price/performance/reliability/comfort/handling ratio on some of these?

 

So far (correct me if I'm wrong, it's the whole point of the thread) I've come across a few that seem okay, but I'm unsure what's an uncool age to get for a bike, like if late 80's is fine or total no-go.

 

Ninja 250's (well older ones) I heard are cheap, but not much in terms of bike power,

Honda CB400F are quite old despite seeming okay.

Kawasaki ER500 looks alright.

 

I'd like to hear some first hand opinions of some LAMS bikes if any of you could, it would be good.

 

But like any bike, I'd have to see what feels right, but I'd like a direction to start in.

 

Budget would likely be up to $4000, I'm not really sure, but I don't want to spend too much on a bike I only get rid of after my LAMS time is up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am an idiot. Ignore this post.

Edited by Cybes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is a nice looking bike pleb, What difference between TT and non TT versions, you know?

 

I bought one for the wife, she loves it and I think it's an awesome looking bike. It only had 8,000 kms on it.

 

In the late '80's, Honda experimented with a number of very unusual motorcycles. The GB500 Tourist Trophy was one of them. Originally marketed in Japan as a 400, it was exported to the US, Europe and Australia as a 500. It was a moderate success in Japan, but in the US sales were hindered by the American love for large engines and dislike of the fairly high price tag.

 

The design used a 4 stroke dirt bike motor that was by that time already famous for its near unbreakability. That thoroughly modern, four valve hemi single was wrapped in a vintage look tube frame and wire wheels, with what some consider to be the world's most beautiful gas tank. The look is pure vintage while actually copying no particular vintage model.

 

The Tourist Trophy name comes from the most famous road race of mid-century motorcycling, the Isle of Man Tourist Trophy competition. This is a tight race on narrow twisty roads through the towns and villages of the Isle of Man (between England and Ireland) where quick steering and precise handling works much better than huge horsepower. It was dominated for many years by single cylinder 500cc racebikes with "the look" that the GB500 copied.

 

In the US, the GB was considered too small and too slow. Sales were slow too. GB's were only imported for two years, 1989 and 1990. By the time the new inventory was gone from the showrooms it had already become known as a cult bike. Today, a good GB sells for as much or more than it did new, in 1990.

 

Quite a number of both the 400cc and 500cc versions were imported into New Zealand, and many are still on the road now. A very popular option as the engines got on in age is a 600cc big bore kit. Many of these kits have been installed in the NZ versions.

 

-wiki

 

Scotts in Rockdale Sydney import them.

 

http://www.scottsmotorcycles.com.au/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anything honda like the vt250,cb250 or vtr250 or the cbr250 are good unbreakable and will lose almost no value, same goes for the cb400 superfour a bit hard to get they seem to be snapped up more quickly they are more powerful than the 500's offered by suzuki and kawasaki but seem too small for me.

 

Suzuki offer the GS500 I have one and so does Master Scythe they are great bikes and about the same price as the 250's they are more powerful (slightly) and much more comfy, a similar bike is the er500 by kawasaki same goes for them they are slightly expensive though.

 

Then you have your cruisers you can get a lot of 650 and below cruisers that are very nice and comfy things like the yamaha v-star 650

which I believe Bowie has and he has had nothing but praise for it as a bike and has racked up a crazy amount of mileage.

 

These are the only bikes I'd buy they are common as hell lose almost no resale value and offer acceptable performance and can teach you all you need to know about riding a moto (everyones out to kill you) What state are you in I know the new NSW laws ream your asshole if you ride a 250 so opt for a larger bike and make the higher rego cost count.

 

DO NOT SKIMP ON GEAR, spend money on a good helmet and jacket and the stores markup on these items is usually 50% so offer them 75% of the price and see how it goes, do not go to a large chain for servicing and ask around for a reliable and cheap mechanic.

Edited by Pomky

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Plebs, that's one nice bike, likely out of my price range at the moment though :P

 

Pomky.

Thanks, that's some of the info I needed to hear, I'll keep my ear out.

 

As for gear, I get my offroad bike gear of a guy, he is reasonably priced and will look after me and my friends.

 

Tarmac looks scarier than trees and rocks and dirt, so I'll go the full hog on gear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can reccomend both bikes I've ridden. You can get your hands on a Sach 150 Express (also known as the KN150) for about $2700 brand new including on roads. Its cheap chinese crap build quality-wise, but its economical to run and the cost of them is so low that if you crash it its almost irrelevant, plus the engine seems solid, even if most of the bodywork is held on by low-quality plastic clips.

 

Currently I'm riding a Honda CBR125R. Its a much nicer bike, but the insurance rates as significantly higher, something to do with faring I think. It has a smaller fuel tank and consequently smaller range, but its economy is just as good, about $6 a week for petrol, and thats using premium. You can pick them up second hand in the realm of 3.5-4k, mine only had 4000km on the clock as well.

 

These are both very much inner-city bikes, both would struggle to hit highway speeds consistantly, but in SA you arn't allowed over 80km/h on your L's anyway, so its pretty irrelevant for me.

 

If you want a bit more power, then the Yamaha Scorpio is another good choice. I've only ridden one breifly at the learner permit test, they are a bit heavier then either of the other two, but they are a 225cc engine vs 150cc for the KN150 and 125cc for the CBR125R. They retail for about $4400 new.

Edited by Sir_Substance

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

get to a bike shop and sit on bikes.

 

The ninja 250 is basicly the same bike it has alwasy been for about 20 years. GPX ZZR adn now the new one all run the sam ebasic paralel twin 250. they seem to run well.

The CB400 is a heavy bike and the new one handles like a barge. it has 400cc Vtec and the extra torque is very welcome over a 250. it is a wide bike, beign an inline 4 and low if you need it low. but it's heavy and feels it.

ER5, or even the newer ER6. both parallel twins.

 

really if you are goign to upgrade on your full licence, get something you can live with and get some skills on.

Get to a bike shop and sit on bikes. make a list of actual bikes that are the right size and have a riding position you like.

as an example, the CB400 is a road sport tourer but the ER5 is quite a sit up bike in the style of a street fighter (for mono's and uprigth control of balance).

 

once you have a list you can look at other issues like, capacity vs ange of travel vs fuel rangee vs "no it looks sad".

 

Also, do nto exclude trailies, off road, dual sport and motards.

heigth, control with the wide bars, weekends away on dirt. bog singles are still LAMS btu have nice torque. and they are easy to work on if you are mechanicaly inclined.

 

if you look after the bike, cleaning , serviceing and just basic stuff, you can still sell it for close the your purchase price. or atleast, minimise depreciation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can reccomend both bikes I've ridden. You can get your hands on a Sach 150 Express (also known as the KN150) for about $2700 brand new including on roads. Its cheap chinese crap build quality-wise, but its economical to run and the cost of them is so low that if you crash it its almost irrelevant, plus the engine seems solid, even if most of the bodywork is held on by low-quality plastic clips.

 

Currently I'm riding a Honda CBR125R. Its a much nicer bike, but the insurance rates as significantly higher, something to do with faring I think. It has a smaller fuel tank and consequently smaller range, but its economy is just as good, about $6 a week for petrol, and thats using premium. You can pick them up second hand in the realm of 3.5-4k, mine only had 4000km on the clock as well.

 

These are both very much inner-city bikes, both would struggle to hit highway speeds consistantly, but in SA you arn't allowed over 80km/h on your L's anyway, so its pretty irrelevant for me.

 

If you want a bit more power, then the Yamaha Scorpio is another good choice. I've only ridden one breifly at the learner permit test, they are a bit heavier then either of the other two, but they are a 225cc engine vs 150cc for the KN150 and 125cc for the CBR125R. They retail for about $4400 new.

Forgot the sachs but they are really only good for the city not on any highway, the cbr125 is too gutless and dearer than a good 250 so not worth it IMO and the scorpio is nice but not as good as a standard 250 or 400 or 500 and not really worth it when you can get 250's like to cb250 for ~2grand and ages is not an issue for them they do not die.

 

get to a bike shop and sit on bikes.

 

The ninja 250 is basicly the same bike it has alwasy been for about 20 years. GPX ZZR adn now the new one all run the sam ebasic paralel twin 250. they seem to run well.

The CB400 is a heavy bike and the new one handles like a barge. it has 400cc Vtec and the extra torque is very welcome over a 250. it is a wide bike, beign an inline 4 and low if you need it low. but it's heavy and feels it.

ER5, or even the newer ER6. both parallel twins.

 

really if you are goign to upgrade on your full licence, get something you can live with and get some skills on.

Get to a bike shop and sit on bikes. make a list of actual bikes that are the right size and have a riding position you like.

as an example, the CB400 is a road sport tourer but the ER5 is quite a sit up bike in the style of a street fighter (for mono's and uprigth control of balance).

 

once you have a list you can look at other issues like, capacity vs ange of travel vs fuel rangee vs "no it looks sad".

 

Also, do nto exclude trailies, off road, dual sport and motards.

heigth, control with the wide bars, weekends away on dirt. bog singles are still LAMS btu have nice torque. and they are easy to work on if you are mechanicaly inclined.

 

if you look after the bike, cleaning , serviceing and just basic stuff, you can still sell it for close the your purchase price. or atleast, minimise depreciation.

Don't get a Ninja, get the old GPZ is cheaper and about the same.

 

The ER5 is a good bike but dearer than the almost identical gs500 for just a more upright riding position from what I've heard.

 

Are you looking to do long hauls I've been looking at a lot of motards and they do not hold up well for long and frequent trips their engines just can't stand it apparently.

 

Forgot too mention the GS500 and all the mentioned hondas are piss easy to maintain yourself with a $100 combination set of tools.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Late 80's Honda GB500 TT

Ha forgot about those, one of the best looking bikes out of Japan IMO.

Morgoth given where you live and what you like to do when not working I would probably go for an on/off road bike of some sort, rather than a pure roady.

 

May be worth nipping up to Zanes Bikes N Bitz at 105 c York St, Devonport, he is pretty clued up on bikes (been wrecking and selling spares and stuff since he was about 14) and has some secondhand road and road/trail stuff.

Google maps

Or you could pinch your little brothers bike if you can make it road legal. :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do not see the point in getting a 500cc bike on your learners. Even a 250 seems a bit extreme. You aren't allowed to go over 80km/h anyway, and your odds of crashing a bike in the first 6 months of riding it are massively higher then at any other time in your riding career.

 

Why would you buy an expensive bike you aren't allowed to use the potential of when you have a good chance of writing it off? Especially since a new rider is far more likely to lose control of a 500cc then a 125cc.

 

Sure, the 125 is pretty gutless for a motorbike, but you cant fully use anything with more kick, so why pay for it?

 

Buy something cheap that you can afford to lose without full comprehensive insurance (the insurance rates pretty much quadruple if you crash a bike on your learners and make a claim, trust me I know.), insure it for third party damage only, and if its still in one piece when you hit your R-date licence, sell it and buy something better then!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do not see the point in getting a 500cc bike on your learners. Even a 250 seems a bit extreme. You aren't allowed to go over 80km/h anyway, and your odds of crashing a bike in the first 6 months of riding it are massively higher then at any other time in your riding career.

 

Why would you buy an expensive bike you aren't allowed to use the potential of when you have a good chance of writing it off? Especially since a new rider is far more likely to lose control of a 500cc then a 125cc.

 

Sure, the 125 is pretty gutless for a motorbike, but you cant fully use anything with more kick, so why pay for it?

 

Buy something cheap that you can afford to lose without full comprehensive insurance (the insurance rates pretty much quadruple if you crash a bike on your learners and make a claim, trust me I know.), insure it for third party damage only, and if its still in one piece when you hit your R-date licence, sell it and buy something better then!

Is this the rule for tassy where I assume he lives?

 

In that case he may as well get a sachs express (look awesome IMO) or a ct110, like you say if he isn't limited and progresses to his P's why not get a 500, the gs500 isn't a fast bike at all BTW balanced throughout and only really capable of going not much more than 130 consistently on flat roads due to the lack of torque in 5th. with my fat ass going much over the speed limit is about all I can do without revving it past 6k and destroying my good mileage.

Edited by Pomky

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do not see the point in getting a 500cc bike on your learners. Even a 250 seems a bit extreme. You aren't allowed to go over 80km/h anyway, and your odds of crashing a bike in the first 6 months of riding it are massively higher then at any other time in your riding career.

 

Why would you buy an expensive bike you aren't allowed to use the potential of when you have a good chance of writing it off? Especially since a new rider is far more likely to lose control of a 500cc then a 125cc.

A 125cc bike at anything over 60km/h is pretty gutless. In NSW, you only have your learners for 3 months before you get you provisional 1 license and can hit 90km/h. You'll need at least a 250 bike for that.

 

A 250 is much better buy if you plan on using it through your whole L, P1 and P2 licenses. And a bigger size bike with a bit more weight it better to learn on.

 

I'm riding the Hyosung Comet 250 for my P's and it's a fun bike. Very comfortable, handles really well, and again learning on a full size bike teaches you a lot more. At stock it can hit 130km/h easy, and I'm almost 90kgs. I'm working on it now to get a bit more punch at lower speeds, just because I want to learn the mechanics of a motorbike.

 

And after riding several other bikes recently, from a Yamaha Scorpio to a KTM 690 duke, I'm happy to recommend the Hyosung Comet 250 as a first bike.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Idea is good, aliali, but I'm keeping the quad for the dirt.

 

Everyone else, I live 30 mins from devonport or launceston, so it will be doing fair bit of highway use, I would assume, but not as often as around town.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yeah I am new to the bike scene and I made a post about it a few months ago. I now have a GPX250. The power of a 250 is more than enough for a new biker. You could get something like a hyosung 650GTR which is LAMS approved. This is a bike the same as the ninja version, which has a limiter on it. Once you are on your blacks, you can unrestrict it to a 650CC and enjoy the power. There are plenty of bikes online in the price range you are after. You would want a 250CC though.. a 125CC won't cut it. You want something which will last you for the 3 yrs (if you are NSW) and a 125 will annoy you really quickly.

 

Obviously gear is an important thing. Get yourself something along the lines of the following

 

a jacket which has removable waterproof lining. This is great as it means you only need 1 jacket instead of 2 (one for winter and summer) because you can remove the lining it still breaths but is also protected by armour. This is the best thing you could get. Before you buy a jacket SIT ON A BIKE. the most important thing is how it feels while you sit on a machine. It might feel good standing up.. but you don't know how it will bunch until you sit down Pants... don't think that jeans will be fine... they will tear faster than fairy floss on a hot summers day. Get yourself a good pair of kevelar jeans.. they wont tear as fast. Gloves with knuckle protectors is always good incase you jam your hands... sounds silly but it will happen being a L plater. Boots are good, but are not always needed. I am still to get boots for my kit but obviously the more protection the better.

 

 

Gear is important but what is even more important is how you ride. You have no protection. Expect that in any moment the guy infront or to the side of you is going to cut into your lane... if you think this you will have more of a chance.

 

 

The above comments are from my experiences alone, as I am a new rider myself. Also.. your mum will hate you.. All mums hate bikes lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone for the input so far, the response is great.

 

Well I'm 22, so I have to do 80 for 6 months on L (this is based on getting them say now.) then 1 year of 80kmh with p plates up, which makes me almost 24, then 1 year of P's but no plates up, then turning 25= full license.

 

so in short, I need a LAMS bike for only 18 months. then 1 year 110kmh (no alcohol), then full licence.

Edited by morgoth

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone for the input so far, the response is great.

 

Well I'm 22, so I have to do 80 for 6 months on L (this is based on getting them say now.) then 1 year of 80kmh with p plates up, which makes me almost 24, then 1 year of P's but no plates up, then turning 25= full license.

 

so in short, I need a LAMS bike for only 18 months. then 1 year 110kmh (no alcohol), then full licence.

That's shit If I had my act together and dad would let me get one I could have had my opens before I got my green P's, it's funny I am restricted on my car license but I can have any motorbike I wish If I won lotto I would buy a 500HP hyabusa just to have it and show how stupid the laws are.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone for the input so far, the response is great.

 

Well I'm 22, so I have to do 80 for 6 months on L (this is based on getting them say now.) then 1 year of 80kmh with p plates up, which makes me almost 24, then 1 year of P's but no plates up, then turning 25= full license.

 

so in short, I need a LAMS bike for only 18 months. then 1 year 110kmh (no alcohol), then full licence.

That's shit If I had my act together and dad would let me get one I could have had my opens before I got my green P's, it's funny I am restricted on my car license but I can have any motorbike I wish If I won lotto I would buy a 500HP hyabusa just to have it and show how stupid the laws are.

 

The Adelaide crew were having this discussion at the last meet. If you have the money and ability, you can get a licence to fly a 747 faster then you can get a licence to drive a SmartCar. Its nuts, and was a very big component in my decision to get a bike licence. Fuck spending 6 months having to have a full licence driver in the car with me, I needed transport right then!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You aren't allowed to go over 80km/h anyway, and your odds of crashing a bike in the first 6 months of riding it are massively higher then at any other time in your riding career.

The highest risk of stacking it is when P-Platers get their open licence and rush out and buy a bike with 3 times or more power from what their used too and most being young and thinking they are bullet proof, fang around at end up throwing it down the black top.

 

Boots are good, but are not always needed. I am still to get boots for my kit but obviously the more protection the better.

IMO boots are essential. Your feet and ankles are very fragile and need all the protection they can get.

 

Also.. your mum will hate you.. All mums hate bikes lol

Depends on you mum. My mum has been riding motorcycles for years.

 

For the OP. Go to a couple of bike shops. Get a feel for the different types of bikes that are available. Don't rush in. Choose a bike with your head and not heart.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Simple tips:

 

1. a 4 cylinder bike costs twice as much to service, avoid them. Try get a straight or V twin.

2. a two stroke is harder to control then a 4 stroke because it doesnt engine brake. It feels more like a pushbike when you stop peddling (2 stroke) than like a manual car which you can semi-control the speed with accelerator (4 stroke)

3. Get your gear from http://bikersgearaustralia.com/ Its cheap, its AMAZING quality (all single piece leather and double stitched). They're amazing. and the sizes are pretty generous. an XXL fit me in the leather jacket; and in all other brands I needed a 4X (despite my normal shirt size being L-XL; go figure). Also Rjays gear has gotten better; just look for doubel stitching, not ALL of it is.

4. Full face helmet, MUCH better and safer; i've seen people smash their chins.

5. Should you get a full face; get some "Cat Crap" it sounds silly but its the best antifox and scratch masker out there (and cheap for what it is).

 

Look for a Suzuki GS500; both myself and Pomky ride one, they're a sweet ride. Nice size.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted Image

 

Give that one a shot! If you dont kill yerself in the first 6 months of ownership, at least youll learn to ride. !!! >;)

 

Lol mate, just jokking, i wouldent want to see you go the way of the dodo, so grab yourself a XR250 mate, there great bikes, owned about 3 myself in years past.

 

Mate, also, Iam not sure how cocky you are, but when it comes to bikes, be PREPARED to come off it.. Sure your a great rider (bet you are), but that dont mean shit when a tin-top puts full anchors on ya. I know a lot of peeps who ride/used to ride... and every single one of use has come adrift at least one time..

 

spend most of your dosh on safety gear.. Boots are a must, as are gloves/jacket/pants.. (fuck jeans, yeah they look cool, but think about how long they will last while your sliding along the road... (nine thenths of fuck all i would recon) If you like jeans, there are some bike pants made with the outer shell looking like jeans.. and gloves... also if you can afford it, a Daniese back protector is GOLD!

did i mention gloves yet?

 

(recon i can still type cos of a set of dainese kevlar racing gloves)

 

good luck mate, its a great way to get around, just dont kidd yourself, your GONNA come off..

Edited by Vanne

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

those bike mentioned seem pretty good. But if your learning you may want to consider getting a naked bike.

Cause their a nice balance point between a cruiser and a sports bike. Easy to handle, comfortable and probably a good starting point.

 

I've commented before in other threads on hopping on for the first few times.

 

good luck and take your time and make sure your comfortable and happy with your protection and choice of bike.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just because you can upgrade after a year doesn't necessarily mean you have to get a throwaway bike to learn with.

 

Over here in WA we are limited to 250cc to start off with. That said, I've ridden a mates Ninja 250R, and it was completely uninspiring. It looks *ok*. But for me, the seating position is too high and I didn't feel connected with the bike. It doesn't ride like a sportsbike should feel like.

 

Consequently, my mate traded it in for the same bike as me.....and Aprilia RS125.

 

I've had my RS125 for almost 2 years now with no intention of upgrading anytime soon. It's easy to ride. Has that 2 stroke powerband that kicks in and makes you *feel* like you're racing. You sit *in* the bike more than *on top* of it. Cornering is sublime. Plus, it's Italian and gorgeous ;)

 

It's not slow. It'll keep up or beat any 250 4 stroke out there. Easy cruises at 100-110kmh. Can also easily get up to 150 to overtake. I've taken it up to almost 170 before backing off.

 

I don't like doing long rides with it though. The racing position gets tiring after a while. but for any sort of stop start ride you wanna do in the metro area, it's great, and enough to lose your license with :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×