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orcone

Does faulty RAM cause PCs to reboot/not turn on?

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As above.

 

I've built a PC for a friend, and the thing randomly decides when it wants to turn on, and crashes on its own. I'm trying to determine if it's a RAM or Motherboard issue. Memtest has been run with the RAM in 2 different PCs, and both times has found errors. I'm now running the PC with known-good RAM and seeing if it'll crash.

 

I can understand bad RAM causes the PC to crash, but this thing just will sometimes refuse to turn on. eg Pressing the power button will do nothing, but if you keep at it, on the 5th try it'll turn on.

 

System specs:

PSU: Antec 350W Basiq

CPU: Intel E5400

HDD: Samsung 500GB Spinpoint F3

Motherboard: Asrock G31M-VS2

RAM: Corsair VS2GB800DS 2GB single stick

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i just had some dodgey ram..... in one of my computers.. it can cause blue screen of deaths..., quite often there will be nothing wrong for a few days then bang blue screen of death....

turning on and off i suspect maybe more motheboard and wiring the power/ reset buttons to their correct jumpers on the mother board. jusy my humble opinion.

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No GPU, using onboard VGA.

 

I can understand the reboots, but not being able to turn the PC on due to faulty RAM seemed to confuse me. With that being said though, I've placed a good stick of RAM in the PC and run memtest and prime95 for 6 hours now without a problem.

 

I'll replace the RAM and give it back to them for a few days, and if it occurs again then I'll know it's the motherboard.

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I had a very similar thing happen to me a couple of years ago...it ended up being the psu.

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Well, martyr seems to have jinxed me.

 

So far, I've replaced the RAM and the motherboard and the issue remains. The PC will simply not turn on unless you repeatedly press the power button 5 or 6 times. I'll be ordering a new PSU and trying that when it arrives.

 

Knowing my luck, it'll probably end up being a dodgy power switch on the case that's doing it! (I don't have the know-how to test that yet).

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Well, martyr seems to have jinxed me.

 

So far, I've replaced the RAM and the motherboard and the issue remains. The PC will simply not turn on unless you repeatedly press the power button 5 or 6 times. I'll be ordering a new PSU and trying that when it arrives.

 

Knowing my luck, it'll probably end up being a dodgy power switch on the case that's doing it! (I don't have the know-how to test that yet).

Just remove the front panel momentary switch leads from the motherboard headers. Then, short the two pins with a screwdriver tip for a moment.

If the board powers up the switch is faulty.

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Well, martyr seems to have jinxed me.

 

So far, I've replaced the RAM and the motherboard and the issue remains. The PC will simply not turn on unless you repeatedly press the power button 5 or 6 times. I'll be ordering a new PSU and trying that when it arrives.

 

Knowing my luck, it'll probably end up being a dodgy power switch on the case that's doing it! (I don't have the know-how to test that yet).

Maybe try swapping the power supplies between the 2 comps before ordering a new one, no point guessing and wasting money if it ends up not being the problem.

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No money will be wasted, I go straight to the importer and can send back new products for a refund if they're re-packaged. I'll be picking up the PSU tomorrow and an Antec PSU tester for the hell of it.

 

CptnChrysler: I'll give that a shot mate.

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On reflection, a safer way to test the switch might be.

 

1: Disconnect the reset button from the motherboard headers - It's not actually needed to run the system anyway.

2: Connect the reset button to the Power switch headers on the motherboard.

3: Test system using the reset button instead of the power button.

 

or

 

just be very careful shorting those power switch pins with a screwdriver.

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