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The finished cable in all its glory (I forgot to embed this pic when I posted):

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Might go through my pics and throw up another small update. Am waiting on the HDD brackets before I post a slightly bigger one.

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Extending fan cables for fan controller

 

As the title says, this was necessary for all the fans to reach the Zalman fan controller mounted at the front of the case. The basic wiring setup is as follows:

 

Rear intake fan: Single stock extension cable (provided with controller)

 

Radiator exhaust fans: Two rearmost fans powered by a splitter cable, remaining two fans powered by a separate splitter cable.

 

Mid-way pump intake fan: cable required lengthening to avoid extension cable use

 

Bottom SSD front intake fan: stock extension cable required extra 10cm length added to reach.

 

Bottom HDD cage intake fan: extension cable required plus extra 5cm length to reach

 

So yeah, this involved a bit of soldering and stuffing around so that all the cables would reach. I forgot to take pics of the routes in the case, but will upload later once it's all neater so you can have a sense of why I had to extend cables.

 

The first bit was to grab the Scythe fan I was going to use for pump intake - I had lost one of my standard width fans so am going to go with the thicker-than-normal Kaze, which will be okay as it blows directly at the GPU - and extend its cable. I removed the three pins from the connector thusly:

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The yellow cable in that pic is to one side as it provides RPM monitoring of the fan - the fan controller will light up red when over 30% of stock speed, and blue under that. I wanted control over my lighting, so removed the RPM monitoring cable on all my fans (or the extension cables). I didn't waste it though; the yellow cable became the additional length I required for the fan to reach the controller. Just cut it in half, stripped it, and soldered as shown:

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I threw away the stock brown 3-pin fan connector that came with the Scythe and replaced with a black one I bought from Gam. I had intended to swap out the female ones but bought the wrong type, 2-pin not 3-pin, so that was a bit sad. I got around it with heatshrink.

 

As the fan splitter cables had a bit of length I chopped them down appropriately, soldered, then sleeved and heatshrinked to hide most of the white connector:

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Reservoir LED lighting and CPU waterblock LED power cables

 

Because LEDs are awesome, I ordered a 5mm premade one for the bitspower stop fitting I already had. Then the usual cutting and soldering of my quick power cable pins and voila:

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Because the fitting wasn't super snug the LED could easily fall out, so I fixed it by squirting a tiny bit of superglue into the fitting and pressing the LED in, leaving it for a bit to dry. Plugged it in, tested, and it worked!

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It's powered by a big extension cable that splits into two male power pins, which also powers the waterblock LED, and will later be wired to the lighting button at the front of the case.

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Also I had run out of my 60-40 lead-tin solder, so bought a replacement from Bunnings for ten bucks, but all they had was lead-free solder. Great for the environment, but harder to work with! Seems to have a much higher melting point, the fumes are pretty rough on my throat, and just takes longer to seep through the joins.

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On the upside, it won't leech into and poison the ground when compy is dead.

 

*Edit*

I'm super tempted to upgrade my OS drive since yeah, why not. Thing is, I can't decide between these two:

Intel 120GB 520 series (want the warranty and speed over SATA 3) $159

OCZ Revodrive3 120GB (highest possible speed, but potential driver headaches for the OS and possibly overkill) $349

 

Thoughts? Is it worth paying almost twice as much for the same capacity? I could get a 240GB Intel drive for that price (not that I need that much more SSD storage).

Edited by TheFrunj

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Thoughts? Is it worth paying almost twice as much for the same capacity? I could get a 240GB Intel drive for that price (not that I need that much more SSD storage).

No, don't get the 240GB. 120gb is fine, all you generally use SSDs for are boot drives, for windows, office, maybe steam + a few games. other than that you won't really notice much in performance.

 

Personally i'd go with the Kingmax 120gb 550/520. 7.7 win rating (if that means anything to you, doesn't to me). only $110-$130.

EDIT: Or the Corsair Force 3 555/510 120gb for $125.

 

If you want to stick with a 240GB It's more alot more than double the price (for the same model/speed) at $325.

Edited by ilyria109

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Depending on the number of games you've got a 240GB might be useful. I know I can't even nearly fit my steam library on my 120GB SSD so larger for me would be great. I wouldn't bother with the revo drive though. Go for a higher capacity SATA3 drive if you want to spend more.

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If you want to stick with a 240GB It's more alot more than double the price (for the same model/speed) at $325.

Yeah, my bad, I fail at maths apparently. I might just go the Intel 520 120GB, as that 5yr warranty and Intel testing is nice. Plus it's dropped in price from $200 not too long ago, now's the time to buy before flash prices rise again.

 

Depending on the number of games you've got a 240GB might be useful. I know I can't even nearly fit my steam library on my 120GB SSD so larger for me would be great. I wouldn't bother with the revo drive though. Go for a higher capacity SATA3 drive if you want to spend more.

Yeah, I think it'll be plenty with just a 120. Found this tool with some googling that looks to be the answer, lets some games be installed on the SSD and the rest of the files installed on a HDD:

http://stefanjones.ca/steam/

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just purchased three 240g intel 330 from b&h for $137 ea + $52 post but it seems a lot of others did the same thing and they have been taken off the site now listed as back order

Moph grabbed two cruicial m4 256g $186ea inc post but there price is now back up to $199ea pp and 512g are $399

id say the prices should drop back down again though

 

edit

aww they canceled my order due to them being unable to get them and probably not at the price they advertised

should have grabbed the m4 256g while on special it seems ah well hopefully they will have the 512g drives on sale again for ~$350

Edited by Dasa

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Mounting a HDD Cage at the Bottom of the Case

 

Update time! It's been a little while as I've been waiting on the HDD brackets to post this bit (I figure if I stay a step ahead of the updates, it'll be easier to keep up the momentum for me. Or something. Don't question alright, it's sorta working!).

 

This update was brought to you by my friend Josh, who did some of the more tiring drilling and grinding work :)

 

At stock, the case comes with three HDD cages that can each hold three 3.5" drives. They mount in the giant column of twelve 5.25" bays, taking up three spaces each. Fans of maths out there would note that this means there's three 5.25" bays to place stuff like fan controllers, ODD drives, or my custom LCD temp bay.

 

However... the 480mm radiator at the top basically eliminates three bays by itself. Meaning that all up, I'm using six 5.25" bays, and that's not enough for all my HDD cages. I don't ~need~ the room as I can mount SSDs anywhere, but I plan on having a few mechanical drives and one of the cages is used for a pump, so I needed to find a new home for the spare cage. What better place than as a bottom-mounted fan intake? (pic)

 

As usual, the first step is to apply masking tape liberally to the area we'll be working to minimise scratches and to provide a surface to draw on. I placed the cage in the orientation I desired it, and traced around all the edges with a pen, keeping the cage still. I then placed a spare 120mm fan within the boundaries of the cage and traced it, as well as the mounting holes, giving me a pretty clear schematic as to what needed doing. I grabbed the drill (handed it to Josh) and the holes were zapped into existence:

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Oh yeah, and I had taken all the mobo and every electronic component out of the case first. Metal shavings and dust do not play nicely with tech!

 

Next it was time to whip out the Dremel with the cutting disc attachment, and I cut out this octagonal shape into the bottom of the case. The aluminium here was REALLY thick, surprisingly so, and it took what felt like forever to do. It also doesn't help that it was very cramped; I had to go in from the PSU mount for some cuts (pic)!

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So the hole's cut in the bottom of the case, but the edges are very rough and sharp. I grabbed the Dremel and swapped in the 60 grit grinding attachment (I had to buy a pack from Bunnings as I'd run out of them), then handed it to Josh who made the edges a bit prettier. Originally we were going to grind it into a circle, but the aluminium was ripping through grinding discs, so we decided to just leave it.

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Then I ripped off the masking tape, gave it a bit of a vacuum to get rid of most of the metal dust, and did a test fit of the HDD cage. The edges were smooth (pic) and the fan screws had just enough length to bite into the fan. However, this fan has a sleeve bearing and will potentially vibrate when placed horizontally like this; and since I'm hoping to mount a couple of hard drives in the cage, they'll all be transmitting vibrations directly into the bottom of the case.

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But it was good enough for now as a proof-of-concept. Josh wound up leaving at this point, and the rest of this post happened on other days.

 

Since the HDD cage will be mounted in plain sight by itself in the bottom of the case, I wanted it to be slightly easier to cable the drives and have it not look totally bleh. I installed two drives in the cages, applied masking tape, and stencilled out the areas where I wanted to be able to run my cables (pic). Then it was time for the Dremel, and I cut them out. This wasn't too bad for the hole at the top of the cage, but the hole at the bottom of the cage along side the raised metal ridge was not fun - I had to wait until the cutting disc wore down just enough to fit under the lip to cut the bottommost edge. Much swearing and a couple broken cutting discs at this part.

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Because the holes were quite narrow, I couldn't fit the Dremel's grinding attachment in them (without making a big mess, anyhow), so it was time to whip out the hand file. I quickly gave up on that idea as it took a lot of effort to get it smooth (pic), let alone make the edges straight, so I grabbed some leftover u-channel (FFFFUUUUUUU) and put it in. Hooray, my sleeved cables (shouldn't) fray!

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The general idea I'm going for looks like this, though the cables will obviously be sleeved. I'm also going to have to do a bit of rejiggery with them, but that's the next post.

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I'm finished with cutting into the two cages that will hold HDDs, so I went ahead and mounted the bottom one, though this time with the addition of an aluminium mesh fan filter on the outside and a silicon frame on the inside. The fan itself also has a silicon frame between it and the HDD cage, so it should be totally vibration-proof (I hope). Unfortunately, all these extra layers of stuff mean that the stock fan screws no longer reach the fan (pic), and my convenient method of mounting the cage wouldn't work. Luckily I had bought some nuts and bolts yonks ago when I mounted the pump into the HDD cage, and rediscovered them. They worked great, and I added a washer as pictured to prevent the nut from pulling through the silicon frame:

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I then threaded the cage onto the bolts, and attempted to affix some nuts to hold it in place. Sadly, my gigantic hands and fingers were ill-suited to this task, and I wound up dropping the nuts so many times it wasn't funny. I enlisted my little sister, and even though it took a couple goes, she got it on and I could tighten with a pair of pliers. Success!

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Phew! Big update. But this also means that I'll get another intake of cool air blowing right at my graphics card, and whatever drives are installed into the cage will be cooled very well.

 

Tune in next time to see my custom SATA power cables!

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Ok, so I've had this update done for a while (or at least the pictures taken and stuff finished), but life decided to get annoying and get in the way of posting it. Basically, my cat Casper died (pictured on my PSU box) after sixteen and a half years... poor thing :( So I was busy burying and all that unfun junk.

 

But yeah, now that's mostly over, time to update so I can get to the really cool stuff later on.

 

Custom SATA Power Y Cable

 

My bottom-mounted HDD cage is great, and the cables I have for the drives would work fine just plugged into normally-oriented hdds, but wouldn't look very neat. Another problem stems from the connector layout for the cable; one connector after another makes it hard to plug drives in while in the cramped little box.

 

So the solution: Make a custom cable.

 

First I took pictures of the connectors as a fail-safe in case I forgot what the individual wire layout was (I had two other stock SATA cables as reference, but you never know). Then it was time to cut off the stock heatshrink and sleeve, then pop open the in-line SATA power connector with a small flathead screwdriver (pic). The power connector at the end of the cable has five small fingers (pic) that I pried up with the screwdriver, and the pins pulled out easily - though I snapped some of the fingers as they're so fragile. Oops. I left the PSU end of the cable alone (pic).

 

Once the connectors were out of the way I snipped the cable in half, leaving the end connector (with the pins) with about 10cm of wire, and the in-line connector with roughly the same length. I then stripped the ends, and splayed the wire inside as shown on top of the composite below. I twisted two strands around each other, then twisted the remaining two strands around that.

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I soldered these to the original length of wire still connected to the PSU end of the cable and then sleeved the lengths before re-attaching the connectors:

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For the sleeving, I decided to sleeve each arm of the 'Y' as an individual cable, then I would later cover the relatively oogly join (pic).

 

I sleeved the remaining part of the cable by removing the pins from the PSU connector, and voila, my SATA Y-cable was complete. The second pic is of the heatshrink that covers up the join:

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I plugged the cable in and routed it from the PSU to the HDD cage (pic), and did a quick test-fit with a drive. Everything seemed to work fine... except that the +12V power pin wasn't being held in by the plastic finger that I broke off, so it came out (pic). I fixed that with superglue. Lots and lots of superglue on all the pins.

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Unfortunately, when I tried a proper test fit with two drives, the icepak heatsink adapter sled thingy for the Velociraptor broke, and its power connector pins were left floating in the middle of nowhere (pic) - hence the need for the Torx screwdriver set from eBay I mentioned earlier. As it turns out, Velociraptor drives need a T9 Torx bit to remove them.

 

I took off the icepak sleds and chucked them in the recycling bin (they're aluminium, they should be perfectly fine - I did hang onto the PCB part), then opened the Scythe 2.5" to 3.5" bay adapters and installed them to the drives. A bit fiddly - and heavy because they're solid steel - but the rubber discs should help cut down on vibration.

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The Scythe bay adapters can hold two standard 2.5" drives, but as the height of the Velociraptor breaks notebook spec (it's something like 14mm compared to 9.5mm) I can only go one drive per adapter. And due to this double-holding ability, there are two sets of mounting holes per set. I used the topmost because it was easier to get the screws in, but the end result was the drive being a little too close to the cage:

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So I took it off, and re-mounted in the bottom position. There's now plenty of room for air to get around the drive, which is important given it doesn't have the heatsink sled:

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I then did some fingerbatics to get my SATA power and data cables attached, and mounted both drives in place. The leftmost drive uses a right-angle SATA cable, but the rightmost drive uses a normal straight one. I suppose if I had planned ahead I could've mounted that drive opposite and used two right-angle SATA cables, but eh, it works:

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So yeah! That's my HDD cage with two velociraptors that will be in RAID 0. Vibrations shouldn't be a problem, here's a run-down of the layers of protection from bottom up:

 

 

Aluminium mesh filter on bottom of case

120mm vibration gasket

case

120mm vibration gasket

hdd cage fan mount frame

120mm vibration gasket

120mm fan

 

and the drives have

Scythe bay adapters with silicon mounts

 

and mount to the cage with lian-li silicon screws

 

 

So fingers crossed no noise other than pure seek!

Edited by TheFrunj

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Sorry to hear about the passng of Casper the cat,Mr Frunj. Its always a horrible time when a long term companion passes.

 

 

Excellent work on the HDD bays and sleeving as per usual, I am really digging the step by step process that your sharing with us all, damn Im looking forward to end product :)

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SSD Mounting and Cable Baffles

 

Another update! I decided upon which SSD I was going for, and landed upon the Intel 520 series 180GB model, which was the highest-performing (manufacturer claimed) model they had. 5yr warranty and all that jazz :)

 

But! I wanted to hide the drives away behind my motherboard tray, or at least on that side of the case, as it makes for slightly neater cabling. Lucky for me the Corsair Force 120 came with a 2.5" to 3.5" adapter sled (pictured in the stop-motion video linked in the OP), and so did the new Intel drive. I applied masking tape to the case and the drive sled, and marked out four mounting holes on each.

 

I then drilled into the Corsair sled (with SSD removed), and used that as my template to drill into the case. I threaded four 1/8" 25mm bolts through the holes on the drive side of the case (as if I went the other way I'd hit the radiator), and secured them to the case with nuts (pic). Annoyingly one of the mounting holes was in a pre-drilled hole and the bolt kept falling out; it wasn't until a bit later when I had a "duh" moment and simply put a washer inbetween the bolt head and the case. Voila! SSD mounted at the top of the case:

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I did the same with the Intel drive sled, masking it up and drilling mounting holes, two at the top and two at the bottom. However, the two bottom mounts got in the way of the pump's HDD cage, so I had to move them to the middle of the sled. But before that could be finalised, I decided to re-use the aluminium dividers I removed from the case earlier, for the purpose of cable hiding.

 

The first step was to mask up and drill the bottom of the first divider, to create a flat edge without the tapped screwholes (pic). I used the dremel, naturally, the cutting disc and then grinding disc to make it a bit smoother. I drilled two holes in the bottom right next to the flat edge, and one into the original tapped screwhole to widen it to the bolt size I had. I held it in place as a template and drilled into the case, threaded bolts through, and drilled the third hole that would attach to the mobo tray:

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I also masked up the edge of the mobo tray and would later dremel that out to make cable runs easier.

 

Then I turned to the second aluminium divider, drilled out all four of its tapped screwholes, and drew where it would mount on the bottom of the case. Since there was no room to drill here, I taped around the edge of the case and drew a straight line around it, and drilled the underside of the case. Threaded a bolt through, held it in place with a nut, and then threaded the divider onto it. Finally I drilled another hole for the top of the divider to hang onto and it was mounted (pic). The two dividers mounted look like this, and they hide the gap between the mobo tray and drive bays pretty well:

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Then it was time to mount the Intel SSD sled (and drive), but the top aluminium divider got in the way of the bolt, and therefore the entire mount. To fix it I just drilled a hole in the divider (pic). So the bolts are held on by nuts to the case, the sled slides over the bolts, the divider slides over the one it overhangs, and then nuts hold it all in place:

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And then my drives are mounted! All that's needed now is power and data; the latter of which works fine, but the stock PSU power cable is ill-suited to the weird spacing between the two drives. But I'll post my fix in the next post.

 

LED Rope PCB Mount

 

What's a system without LED lighting, you ask? Not a very good one, I reply! The problem with the NZXT rope kit I bought is that the original controller/resistor setup is mounted to a PCB that is attached to a PCI bracket, which would have it starting midway through the case and being annoying to cable. So I did the easy solution; unscrewed the bracket, masked up the case in a spot I wanted it, and then drilled some mounting holes:

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I threaded some 1/8" bolts through, and secured it with four half-hex 1/8" nuts. These work as a stand-off of sorts, and will stop the rear of the PCB from shorting against the metal of the case. Then I threaded on the PCB, and another nut on each bolt to hold it there, and voila!

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I had also dremelled out a chunk of the dividing bar just above the LED rope mount to allow cables to pass through here when the side panel is back on. I'll be soldering some connectors onto the power cable for the rope PCB, which will be wired into the lighting circuit button control at the top of the case, so I can go stealth at will.

 

That's all for now, I'm gettin' there! :) Shoot me any questions you might have in the thread or via PM, happy to clarify how I did anything.

 

Also thanks dishd, glad you're enjoying it :)

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You're doing an absolutely amazing job, i thought that would be all the posts, then next thing i know, you doing something else. Keep up the good work, and creativity, any chance of getting some full case pics, with all the mods you've done so far, as like a "before, after" shot, just that it's been a while, and i'd like to see how everything is working along together.

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Sure thing ilyria109!

 

Here's the front of the case, minus the fascia with the buttons in it because I'm too tired to bother threading cables through places just for photos. Mostly final, the only thing that has to be put in place is that bottom HDD cage.

 

Now in giganto-res of 2000x3000px (when clicked):

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Then the rear, which doesn't have the graphics card installed, but does have an aluminium mesh filter over the intake at the top:

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The side of the case with most of my bits sitting there just chillin':

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And the other side which is currently a big mess, waiting for me to finish the lighting system and SSD power:

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The other thing missing is the radiator and fans, which are both off to the side because they get in the way of doing stuff (and are heavy).

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this is coming along great!

 

Keep up the great work!

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Finishing the Pump Mounting HDD Cage

 

So it is finally time to get this damn pump assembled in its proper place, something I started in December 2010.

 

Basically, I taped up and measured the mounting holes for my pump, then drilled them into the bottom of the hdd cage. I grabbed some bolts and nuts, then cut up one of the thermal silicon pot holders from Kmart to sit underneath and act as vibration dampening (which I've been using a lot since my home server antics for Atomic). It looks like this from bottom up:

 

Bolt head

HDD cage

silicon pot holder

metal washer (to stop the silicon from tearing/shifting)

pump mounting plate

metal washer

nut

 

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Because the Laing D5 Vario comes with a metre or so of cable I trimmed it down and attached my own connectors (pic), which lets me power it however I wish, as well as making cabling a bit neater (pic). I sleeved it because why not.

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Then I did something else for a while, and wound up losing my painted 25mmx120mm fan. Where it is, who knows. I've been over the house looking for it and have had no luck. I know it'll turn up as soon as I've finished, but ah well.

 

So luckily I had a 35x120mm fan I had painted that I was hoping would be the rear intake, which didn't fit, so is the perfect replacement for my cage. Since no HDDs will be mounted in here (there ain't no room) I had freedom to chop it to bits to get things to fit. Out came the masking tape and I measured the room needed for the thicker fan to fit:

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I first drilled out the rivets holding the original fan mount on, which is as simply done as it is described. Just chose a bit that fit into the center of the rivet, and drilled until it popped off:

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Then I dremelled the top line, and went down the sides. As it was bent inwards I dremelled as far down as possible without cutting through the bottom plate, and then bent the piece back and forth until it snapped:

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Then it was time to mount the fan. I couldn't use screws because I got rid of the original mounting frame, so it was time for the best invention ever: cable ties. I grabbed a 120mm fan mounting dealie (pictured here on another fan/hdd cage combo) and cable tied it to the rear side of the fan - the side that the air exits:

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You might notice a strip of silicon pot holder under the fan on the cage in that above pic; I had thought the fan would sit on it and further reduce vibrations, but it wound up raising the fan too high and preventing the cage from fitting back in the case, so I took it out. The mounting pressure is high enough that it doesn't touch the floor anyway.

 

Then I got some more cable ties and created four loops at the rear of the hdd cage, then loosely cable tied the front of the fan to those loops. I tightened them evenly and the fan was sturdily in place:

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I finished it off by securing the pump cage to the case with the lian li thumbscrews with their hdd mounting silicon washers cut in half, which should hopefully minimise vibrations further. You can see that in the side-on picture from my previous post.

 

So yeah, that's the pump cage done. Gettin' closer :)

Edited by TheFrunj

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Frankenstein's Monster (SATA Power Cable)

 

Alright, so we have the SSDs mounted to the rear of the chassis tray (other side of the drive bays), and all we need is power. But though you've seen a shiny finished cable in the four preview pics I did for ilyria, I haven't described how I did it! So let's do that.

 

First up I grabbed the longest stock SATA power cable, and as I had three devices to power (Intel SSD, Corsair SSD, Samsung Bluray drive) I decided to keep all three plugs on this one. Unfortunately due to the weird spacing between these different devices, the cable was nowhere near reaching.

 

To fix it I bought some similar-gauge wire from Jaycar and did far too much soldering:

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Then it needed sleeve, so I measured the lengths between connectors and chopped up three sets of sleeve like so:

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Slid the sleeve over the wires:

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Then added some heatshrink and poked the wires back into the connector, using my already-finished custom Y cables as reference. I decided to use white heatshrink to hold underneath the connector and red above, merely because I was rapidly running out of my MDPC black :(

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Shrinkin' heatshrink and stuffing up (sleeve will melt with just the heat off a barbecue lighter). I recommend not watching TV like I was at the time:

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Did the whole cable, and you can't really see my stuffed-up bit:

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Then it was time to plug it in! Hooray! Oh wait... no. It won't plug in as the SSD is flush against the drive sled. Poop.

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So it was off with the sled and out with the masking tape, and I marked out the spot where the connectors attach, keeping the boltholes in mind (also notice a new addition to my family!):

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Dremelled that bit out, whacked it back into the case, and the SSD now receives power!

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That's all this update - I'm out of picture embeds - but I might have another coming soon. Got a bit of time on my hands.

 

Million Dollar PC contender for sure.

 

Awesome work.

Thanks! Not sure the quality is there, but I'm on the right track :)

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GPU Power Cable Sleeving

 

As the title says, GPU sleeving tiems. Seasonic has again been weird and slightly dodgy, this time with the PSU end of the PCI-e power cables.

 

What they've done is basically joined the extra two ground pins of the PCI-e 8-pin cable to existing ground pins of the 6-pin (pic), meaning that they're not really proper new wires. Silly Seasonic. Ah well. Sleeved them the regular way:

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So yup, that's done.

 

Custom Molex power cable for Lighting Circuit

 

This one is pretty simple, just got the stock cable with three connectors on it and removed all of them with my Molex tool. Bent the first connector's pins as pictured, slid some heatshrink over them to prevent shorts, sleeved the cable, and re-inserted into the Molex connector:

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Then hooray, Molex cable sleeved and finished:

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Next it was time to make an adapter with lots of male Molex pins to power all my various female connectors around the shop. I had run out of the tube of lead-free hobby solder, and so had bunnings, so I got a reel of the same stuff from the same manufacturer. However... it didn't really behave. Horrible, awful stuff. Leading to horrible, awful joins (pic).

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Seriously, screw the planet, I want my lead-tin solder back >:(

 

But yeah, that was done, and it looks like this, and even works:

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Unfortunately I made a boo-boo and forgot that I had wired male pins to the 12v LED in the lighting circuit button, and male pins to the new adapter that I just finished sort-of sleeving:

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Sploops.

 

So to fix it I cut some heatshrink from a pack I had of various lengths (crappy 2:1 cheap, nasty stuff) and stretched it out with pliers so it would fit over both male connectors (pic). Shrunk it, and voila, close enough not-quite-modular-but-it-is-in-spirit:

Posted Image

 

The power adapter does these things:

 

12v + & -

Lighting Circuit Button LED

Laing D5 Vario Pump

 

5v + & -

LCD Temperature Display Unit

Lighting Circuit Button Terminals

Double Adapter From Button Terminals:

Reservoir LED & Waterblock LED

LED Rope

Yup. Bit tired today, and I'm kicking myself for reasons I'll elaborate on in a later post. Expensive reasons :P

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Excellent work and posting Mr Frunj!!

I have to agree with you the lead-Tin free solder is shite! Iv never been a huge fan of the lights-in-a-case pimp style, BUT the level of detail and work that has gone into your project is making Project Red an exception to that (just quietly im very Jelly of your lights). The sleeving work is coming along great and the HDD/pump cage fan mod turned out really well, love the way you have mounted the SSD, man this is such a cool project, *tips hat* keep up the awesome level of work Mr Frunj :)

 

ps looking forward to the next post, but im worried about the expensive mistake..... :)

Edited by dishd

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I must admit, this thread has very much become one of those "stay tuned for your favourite episodes" kinda deal :P

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I must admit, this thread has very much become one of those "stay tuned for your favourite episodes" kinda deal :P

But the stay tuned..is the best bit of any TV show..:P

 

Nice work fungi! Keep it up!

 

also are your dominator's the fabled,legendary GTX2's? :D

Edited by jdog

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My big mistake...

 

Also, I hope you only hit the fins and not the lines on the rad, although I'm pretty sure the RX rads have the lines away from the screw holes.

I only screwed in and heard a slight crinkling noise, and did not screw in with much force. I'm pretty sure that I didn't hit the lines.

The above quote is totally relevant to my big mistake.

 

So as it turns out, I had crunched right through a line in the XSPC RX480 rad; not just one, but a couple. Amusingly they're placed directly underneath the screw holes, and for some reason I had thought the lines would be round tubes, not thin oval ones. After causing headaches locating where the leak was coming from, I eventually worked out that I had broken my poor radiator :(

 

$141 later and I ordered a new one from PCCG on Monday, it turned up yesterday and I whacked it in place today. It doesn't leak! And this is somewhat ironic (and useless), but XSPC include this little note with their radiators now:

Posted Image

 

For the click-impaired it reads:

 

"WARNING

 

Please make sure to use the correct length screws when mounting the radiator to a case panel, or attaching fans. Only 6mm screws should be used to mount the radiator to a case panel. Using longer screws will puncture the radiator core and void the warranty. The provided 30mm screws should only be used on fans with a depth of 25mm."

So yeah.... not much help to me now. Guess I'll be taking the broken one to a scrap metal place as it's no good to anyone.

 

I tried using the 6mm included screws with the rad, but they weren't long enough to make it through the top grille and into the rad. The only solution was to shorten the eight black ones I bought from the hobby shop, which was fucking awesome looking:

Posted Image

 

It was also hard to hold onto the pliers while the dremel was going, but it was worth it.

Posted Image

 

Wound up shortening them to roughly 9mm in length.

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My brother was around so he took off the fans from the old radiator and screwed them to the new one (and took the pics of me dremelling my screws to size):

Posted Image

 

So yeah, that's my expensive mistake! Won't be making that one again :P

 

Next post: Cutting tubes and getting it all connected!

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Nice pictures of the dremel in action, surprised you did it inside. Looking excellent so far, bad news about the radiator, seen plenty of people make that mistake though so don't feel too bad. I am particularly impressed with your sleeving and custom cables. I originally wanted to do those kind of things to my PC but just lost the motivation once it was assembled and working.

 

I found it really hard to get my tube cuts nice and clean, even with big scissors, but luckily, there is a cheap solution. You can get tube cutters like this from Bunnings for around $9 and they produce a nice clean cut. If you don't see them with the tools, they will probably be near the reticulation stuff.

Posted Image

 

New addition to the family looks cute :) Keep up the good work.

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Shame XSPC don't seem to make an EX series 480 rad. My EX360 was only $60 or so, and it performs really well (though it is a little more restrictive than an RX360, its about half the size and performs just as well otherwise).

 

Good to see your making progress on it though, will be awesome to see it when it's all together and running. Keep up the sweet work :)

 

I found it really hard to get my tube cuts nice and clean, even with big scissors, but luckily, there is a cheap solution. You can get tube cutters like this from Bunnings for around $9 and they produce a nice clean cut. If you don't see them with the tools, they will probably be near the reticulation stuff.

http://i1196.photobucket.com/albums/aa420/...ds/b461d744.jpg

Wish I'd seen those when I did my setup, they look like the way to go. I ended up using a REALLY sharp hobby knife that was meant for whittling I had bought for my warhammer; had a really long blade on it that made it fairly easy to get a good, clean cut. Edited by G-relk

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