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The SSD Watch thread

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and here's a brand new one from G.Skill, the Phoenix......so far I'm pretty rapt with the 128G Falcon (not the Falcon II, which is slower.....)

Check out the features

 

* Available in 50GB and 100GB capacities

* Native TRIM support

* Seek Time: .1ms

* Slim 2.5" Design

* 99.8 x 69.63 x 9.3mm

* Operating Temp: 0°C ~ 70°C

* Storage Temp: -45°C ~ +85°C

* Low Power Consumption: 2W in operation,

.5W in standby

* Shock Resistant up to 1500G

* Compatible with Windows XP, Vista, 7, and Linux

* MTBF: 1,5 million hours

* Max Read: up to 285MB/s

* Max Write: up to 275MB/s

* Sustained Write: up to 200MB/s

 

and here's the review.......

http://www.guru3d.com/article/gskill-phoen...0gb-ssd-review/

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http://hardware.slashdot.org/story/10/06/1...SD-Breakthrough

 

"Anobit Technologies announced it has come to market with its first solid state drive using a proprietary processor intended to boost reliability in a big way. In addition to the usual hardware-based ECC already present on most non-volatile memory products, the new drive's processor will add an additional layer of error correction, boosting the reliability of consumer-class (multi-level cell) NAND to that of expensive, data center-class (single-level cell) NAND. 'Anobit is the first company to commercialize its signal-processing technology, which uses software in the controller to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, making it possible to continue reading data even as electrical interference increases.' The company claims its processor, which is already being used by other SSD manufacturers, can sustain up to 4TB worth of writes per day for five years, or more than 50,000 program/erase cycles — as contrasted with the 3,000 cycles typically achieved by MLC drives. The company is not revealing pricing yet."

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and here we have the new 1.8" SSD's from OCZ

http://www.ocztechnology.com/products/soli...8--sata-ii.html

 

 

OCZ Technology unveils an SSD

1.8-inch of small footprint goodness

By Spencer Dalziel

Fri Jun 18 2010, 12:25

 

CALIFORNIA COMPONENT MAKER OCZ Technology has launched a 1.8-inch Solid State Disk (SSD).

 

The company claims its SSD supports a smaller footprint for the thin and light laptops market. So expect to see these bunged into ultra-thin laptops, netbooks, nettops, and tablets.

 

OCZ said the 1.8-inch SSD has the same performance as the bigger 2.5-inch models but offers mobility features. It uses a SandForce 1.8-inch Vertex 2 assembly and the sequential transfer rates are 285MB/sec read and 275MB/sec write.

 

The 32GB and 64GB capacity models use only one watt of power on full load and have a SATA 3Gb/sec interface. There are also 60GB, 120GB, and 240GB models available.

 

OCZ also offers an Onyx SSD that uses an Indilinx controller with 64MB of cache and can drive transfer rates up to 145MB/sec.

 

"We are now introducing two new drives that are designed to cater to the entire range of mobile applications including the Vertex2 1.8 [inch] and the new Onyx 1.8 [inch] which is designed for consumers looking for a quality SSD that is aggressively priced and is ideal for Netbooks," said Alex Mei, CMO of the OCZ Technology Group.

 

OCZ didn't release any price information but you can visit its product page here. µ

 

http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/1...ogy-unveils-ssd

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http://www.pcauthority.com.au/News/217358,...of-the-ssd.aspx

 

Switch to an SSD and your laptop or PC could run faster and more smoothly. But before you take the plunge it's important to understand the issues

The SSDs in our latest Labs test are designed as drop-in replacements for conventional hard disks, and in everyday use they should behave just like their platter-based predecessors. After you install one, the biggest changes you can expect to see are your OS and applications loading up more quickly, and file transfers taking less time to complete.

 

But moving to SSD technology does raise some issues that don't apply to mechanical disks, and before you take the plunge it's important to understand them.

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I think that its important to remember that whatever the media, HDDs and SSDs involve making a compromise. In HDDs, even the raptors have around a 5ms delay, making it by far the slowest component in your box. This is fixed with the SSDs, they perform nearly 100 times faster (in seek latency times) than a regular hard drive. Its just that they have a high cost per Gb. Its just that we are used to making the compromise with HDDs because before SSDs, there was no real other alternative. And before someone starts talking about how RAIDs are so much faster, they still suffer the same latency delays that a regular HDD does.

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I agree with you there superhamster. In essence, what a RAID0 of HDDs have is multiple independant read/write heads accessing information instead of just the one in a single HDD. It allows of faster gathering of data. However, that really still suffers from the mechanical latency that all HDDs have. With SSDs (by this I am only speaking about the NAND kind), there is no mechanical limitation but they are, however, limited in write speeds (due to block erasure) and the lifetime of the product (due to memory wear), due to the inherent nature of NAND flash memory. There were, however, alternatives for HDDs but most of them were enterprise level type hardware where the cost would be indeed exhorbitant like RAM-Drives. Even when Intel released is X25 SSD, it stated that it was more for enterprise level hardware however true that may be.

 

MacDude, on a bit of side note, I remember that particular SSD, the 80GB Intel X25 selling for close to $800 dollars when it was first released and how, even then, atomicans were salivating on the performance of this new hopefully mainstream product.

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I was originally going to purchase a Intel X25-V 40GB for $179 from PC Case Gear, but I just had a look through the MSY pricelist and found a larger, faster drive for cheaper!

 

A 64GB Kingston for $169!

Kingston SNV425-S2

 

I'll hopefully be able to pick one up today from the MSY Auburn store.

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MSY don't have any in stock, neither do CCPU computers at Carlingford who had it at the next best price of $178.

 

This might be hard to find.

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Just went out and bought a 128gb Kingston SSD from MSY for $319. They didn't have the 64gb even though their site says they had it in stock. They saw me coming :(

 

It was the SNV425-S2

Edited by orcone

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Upped your budget a little there mate ;)

 

It's good huh! Are you running Windows7 as well?

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Upped your budget a little there mate ;)

Just a little. I'm glad I forked out the extra though, because from what I've seen so far I'll definitely be having this in my next couple of builds (if it lasts that long!)

 

It's good huh! Are you running Windows7 as well?

Running Windows 7 64 bit. The boot up time isn't as fast as I'd like it to be, and I will be looking into ways to speed it up even further. My POST screen takes up most of the boot time though!

If only my motherboard (Gigabyte EP45-DS4P) had a quick boot option! I've disabled floppy drives and changed the boot order around, but it still takes ages on "Verifying DMI Pool data".

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It's definitely a thing to buy and keep, just don't forget to leave it at the login screen for TRIM to do it's job.

 

Yep I found that as well, also if you have a normal HDD it will slow boot stuff down.

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Watched the review. Looks promising. Can anyone tell me what's the difference between the OCZ Vertex 2 and the OCZ Vertex 2 (E) ?

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Running Windows 7 64 bit. The boot up time isn't as fast as I'd like it to be, and I will be looking into ways to speed it up even further. My POST screen takes up most of the boot time though!

If only my motherboard (Gigabyte EP45-DS4P) had a quick boot option! I've disabled floppy drives and changed the boot order around, but it still takes ages on "Verifying DMI Pool data".

If you are concerned about boot time (a very small fraction of the time spent "on the computer"), why not suspend/hibernate?

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http://hardware.slashdot.org/story/10/07/2...ace-Hard-Drives

 

"Flash drive capacities have been expanding dramatically in recent years, but this article says that's about to change, in part because of the limits of current lithography technology. Meanwhile, disk drive densities will continue to grow, which the author says will mean many years before solid state drives replace hard drives — if they ever do. From the article: 'The bottom line is that there are limits to how small things can get with current technology. Flash densities are going to have data density growth problems, just as other storage technologies have had over the last 30 years. This should surprise no one. And the lithography problem for flash doesn't end there. Jeff Layton, Enterprise Technologist for HPC at Dell, notes that as lithography gets smaller, NAND has more and more troubles — the voltages don't decrease, so the probability of causing an accidental data corruption of a neighboring NAND goes up. "So at some point, you just can't reduce the size and hope to not have data corruption," notes Layton.'"

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