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Yeah thats what I was referring too. I know mates that cant move up anywhere without have a degree which is crazy.

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CCNA + MSCE (or whatever its called) is what you should start out with. You'd be surprised the progression paths that you can pick up from doing support, you've just gotta find the right company for you. The way I've done things is move around every 8-12months until you find the right joint. Very happy with company I'm with now, we support various industries, but mainly work the mining sector.

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What did you do at college? Whilst I do agree with most people here about getting all your pieces of paper straight away, Its useless if you don't enjoy the work or if your not cut out for it. And to the people expecting to get a lvl 1 support role and just sit there untill somone offers somthing all I can say is wow. Life must be pretty easy for them if expect with no chasing and no hard work to just be handed a promotion! If I had anyone on my team like that your definitely right I'd be weeding those types of people out and letting them find other work.

 

btw I've just turned 21 too :P

Yeh you took that the completely wrong way. As I said before. Im happy to do the work. I dont stop working and i've progressed in my current workplace because of that.

And no my life isn't easy, But good try on the personal stab there, for whatever reason. The rest of your posts were actually helpful.

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Well, I don't think Education is the issue, but rather the public sector in general. They reeally can't offer too much flexibility in these matters, I could probably get a decent job in the private sector if I tried.

I work in the public sector without any qualifications, but I did start out in the regions as desktop support and then move up to the head office in another role and proved myself

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Most of the important points have been covered in this thread but if you feel you want to get some form of certification to show an employer that you can learn and at least know the basic theory of networking I'd say grab your CCNA and see where that gets you.

 

A diploma in networking will also help you in the right direction and its only a year (two depending on what you do) of your life, plus you can study for and do your CCNA during it as you will find a fair bit of spare time during it no doubt anyway.

 

I have just finished off two diplomas in networking in just over 12 months with relative ease and it was invaluable because I got to spend a fair amount of time with different areas of networking so I could figure out exactly where I wanted to specialize and focus on.

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Most of the important points have been covered in this thread but if you feel you want to get some form of certification to show an employer that you can learn and at least know the basic theory of networking I'd say grab your CCNA and see where that gets you.

 

A diploma in networking will also help you in the right direction and its only a year (two depending on what you do) of your life, plus you can study for and do your CCNA during it as you will find a fair bit of spare time during it no doubt anyway.

 

I have just finished off two diplomas in networking in just over 12 months with relative ease and it was invaluable because I got to spend a fair amount of time with different areas of networking so I could figure out exactly where I wanted to specialize and focus on.

sounds awesome.

 

Lucky for me, when i did cert 3 in IT at tafe last year, they(tafe) included semester 1 of the CCNA into cert 3, in cert 4, you do semester 2 and 3, then finally in the diploma, you do the final semester

and walk away with the CCNA certification at no extra cost. It would of been awesome if they included the Microsoft equivalent as well, but im told its pretty easy once your done half

of cert 4.

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When I was at tafe my Microsoft tafe teacher taught us the MCSA course as he was a certified Microsoft trainer. Was pretty good except the books were so expensive if you wanted to buy them. Though the Labs were fantastic.

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Bachelor in IS will help you work your way into management, MS will help you get into netowrk and sysadmin work.

 

If you are already a LAN/SYSAdmin, do the MS stuff to make you worth a bit more, then the Bachelor to get you into your boss' job.

 

I am looking at the bachelor as I am looking to get a management role in the next 6 years, and the BIS will help me do that.

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When I was at tafe my Microsoft tafe teacher taught us the MCSA course as he was a certified Microsoft trainer. Was pretty good except the books were so expensive if you wanted to buy them. Though the Labs were fantastic.

Yeah that was the only gay thing, the books cost a fortune, but I wasn't that worried about it because I got a government living grant so its only cost me $18000 total for my two diplomas, A+, N+ and 4 Microsoft Certs of my choosing (including all of the Microsoft 6XX series books and labs etc) and they gave me $200 a week for living costs which is $14500 of that $18000 anyway.

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Yeah he still gave us everything we needed though "even though he wasn't supposed to he could tell that 2 of us were genuinely interested. Bloody good teacher.

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Just thought i would let you in on what i'm currently doing.

a Diploma in Information Technology (Networking) @ TAFE

 

There are the CISCO (TAFEplus) courses which prepare you for the CCNA as well as some Redhat Academy classes which allows you to get some Redhat sysadmin certificate amongst other general IT classes to get everyone up to speed. My teachers don't rank the MS courses too highly compared to linux/cisco although they could be biased xP. You mentioned doing it through an organizational for the structure although at a whopping price ($4950).

With centrelink benefits, the course i'm currently doing can be $51 per semester or normally $637? (or about that) Add to that the CISCO fees of $350 per subject and it appears to be significantly cheaper for the same sort of content.

 

You can ask me any questions about the subjects i'm doing, although if you were considering the TAFE option at all i would advise going into a campus and talking to one of the head teachers. I've found them to be a very friendly and VERY knowledgeable group of people.

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Well, MS certs are a good baseline to have, just about every organisation runs some sort of Windows system (either desktop or desktop/server), Linux sysadmins demand a high price, but their application may be niche.

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I am 25, I did my bachelor in computer scinece after I left school.

 

I have been working for 4 years now where I am currently a systems engineer. my first job out of Uni (with the same company) was a Helpdesk Officer.

 

My work has paid for my certs which: Microsoft MCITP Enterprise Administrator and Messaging Administrator.

I did some Citrix, VMware and Cisco courses at Excom (now closed) but never did the certs.

 

I am trying to find a new job and I have found that the employers are only interested in my MS / VMware / citirx training and certs and have not even asked to see my academic transcript of even what specifically I studied at Uni, what my GPA was etc.

 

I don’t regret doing my degree, that how i got my first job, but I am disappointed that it doesn’t seem to mean much more than a few 1 week courses and a few more week of cramming like hell for the Microsoft multi choice tests.

 

Charles Sturt has some good courses that let you get your Degree and Your Certs in the same course (The IT certs count towards the degree) I am thinking of using my certs and my degree as credit towards a masters degree. Google “IT Masters” for more info.

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I am 25, I did my bachelor in computer scinece after I left school.

 

I have been working for 4 years now where I am currently a systems engineer. my first job out of Uni (with the same company) was a Helpdesk Officer.

 

My work has paid for my certs which: Microsoft MCITP Enterprise Administrator and Messaging Administrator.

I did some Citrix, VMware and Cisco courses at Excom (now closed) but never did the certs.

 

I am trying to find a new job and I have found that the employers are only interested in my MS / VMware / citirx training and certs and have not even asked to see my academic transcript of even what specifically I studied at Uni, what my GPA was etc.

 

I don’t regret doing my degree, that how i got my first job, but I am disappointed that it doesn’t seem to mean much more than a few 1 week courses and a few more week of cramming like hell for the Microsoft multi choice tests.

 

Charles Sturt has some good courses that let you get your Degree and Your Certs in the same course (The IT certs count towards the degree) I am thinking of using my certs and my degree as credit towards a masters degree. Google “IT Masters” for more info.

That's probably because you are 25 and have experience. University grades don't mean a lot after a couple of years, though I'd consider what subjects you studied.

FWIW, I did the Masters of System Development (MCSD stream) from Charles Sturt, by correspondance some years back. I found it to be pretty much a waste of time (then why did I do it you ask? lol). Basically the Masters included the certs, though you could get credit for ones already done, and I already had MCAD certs so that helped. The other subject were, for the most part, covered in my undergraduate IT degree. We did a whole semester on ethics, which wasn't covered at Uni, I think. I think the object modelling subject was a little more difficult than uni. hard to remember. I get the feeling the course was more a Masters coursework aimed at people from other backgrounds (although that's not what the initial marketing said :)). It could also have been that I had been out of uni for a few years already (5 I think) and was more experienced and well read. Perhaps consider where you want your career to go - eg Managing or staying technical.

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I've always been confused about the requirement for a diploma or degree for certain positions. I've done a lot of self-teaching, and a lot more on-the-job learning. When I was at TAFE, I passed all the technical subjects, even testing right out of some.

 

I'm convinced I could RPL the CertIII course. CertIV and Diploma are different in that they have other subjects, such as business, management and project management subjects (which I hated at the time)

 

I don't think I'd really learn anything extra by doing a Diploma. I'd be much more interested in doing the Certifications which offer real-world knowledge and have direct applications. (Pity I can't afford to do them myself)

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smadge, it's easier to look at bits of paper than to perform position description specific testing. Also they say that getting a Diploma or Degree speaks about a persons ability to focus over the long term. I don't think much of that theory.

 

I've worked at places where you had to have an IT/CS degree to be either a developer or a support team member. I've had people I knew were great with no formal certs that I wanted to hire, but could not. I've also hired some real doozies that had post graduate research degrees :(

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Honestly, I would go with the Bachelors--it shows more commitment than just taking a short test to get a certification in it. It'll definitley look more appealing to employers in the long run, for sure. But you can always take the extra step to do BOTH--which will look killer next to each other ;)

 

The IT industry, or any computer/network field is always in demand, so it'll definitley be great career path if you do decide to stick through with it. But I found some articles on the web describing what the IT job demand is in the near future that may help you make up your mind:

1. http://www.infoworld.com/d/adventures-in-i...-job-demand-768 - the job demand for IT careers and survival guide

2. http://www.it-career-coach.net/2010/02/23/...in-high-demand/ - this one describes the top 7 DB careers in demand

3. http://www.onlineitdegree.com/ - if you're looking for an alternative school method, getting your IT degree online could be a good possibility

4. http://www.baselinemag.com/c/a/IT-Manageme...Jobs-in-Demand/ - and the 10 hottest IT jobs in demand

 

Have you had any formal schooling yet? Or any past experience in IT? That can kind of help us where to point you to next as well, because if you're already really knowledge in the field, then it might actually be best for you to look into the certificate.

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Certifications are where its at.

 

Get a diploma from tafe to get your foot in the door, then smash up some cisco stuff

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