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witcher01

Windows 8 Information ?

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Tablet PCs replace netbooks but they won't replace a full desktop or laptop. I have a netbook and a smartphone (and three laptops). I don't need a tablet pc at all.

You're not at all the target demographic I was referring to. I don't need a tablet pc either. And Windows 8 tablet pc's will be more feature rich tablets than the iPad, as the article says.

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Tablet PCs replace netbooks but they won't replace a full desktop or laptop. I have a netbook and a smartphone (and three laptops). I don't need a tablet pc at all.

You're not at all the target demographic I was referring to. I don't need a tablet pc either. And Windows 8 tablet pc's will be more feature rich tablets than the iPad, as the article says.

 

I tend to agree with Microsoft.... That people will treat their desktops as "Home server's".

 

So we'll probably more of those streaming, connecting, serving functions get built into Windows. That way Microsoft can be a full techosystem provider. For your PC, tablet, and mobile phone.... All seamlessly working together through program... And live service alike.

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The batch language is improving, yes... but line editing is only marginally better than some primitive shells in 30-year old Unix dialects... and it unfortunately understands nothing of Borne shell, which is bad news as it basically forces you to install a separate shell to get the job done, or duplicate your efforts writing the same scripts in two languages. (Pity autoconf can't generate batch scripts.)

 

I'm facing this now. Writing an application to build on both Windows (using VisualStudio), Linux, and MacOS X. The latter two are easy since they both use gcc, and there's just a few little Apple-inspired quirks to worry about. Windows on the other hand; I'm having the mind-bending exercise of figuring out how to write a Makefile and wrapper scripts that will take Unix-style paths generated by a Cygwin/MSYS environment, and translate that to the world of DOS for cl.exe's tiny little mind.

 

Worse though, is the appauling terminal emulator one has to deal with. You'd think that after all this time, they'd have made some provision for a cmd.exe-compatible terminal that can do greater than 80 columns, has a decent scrollback buffer and understands something of ECMA48 escape codes. Don't mind if it's some command switch you need to give it to enable the feature. I know MSYS had a hacked-up RXVT which I quite liked. It was half way there to being decent.

 

It unfortunately did not work with old DOS applications, since stdin and stdout was handled by reading from the keyboard buffer and writing to CGA memory. Microsoft could do well to improve this, there are lots of cases where being able to say, start up an equivalent of GNU screen, run a command-line script that will take some time, then detach the session and let it putt along nicely in the background, would be a godsend.

Your walls of text are the only ones that i bother reading. Full of information worth reading.

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Improving our file management basics: copy, move, rename, and delete

 

We wanted to do an early Windows 8 post about one of the most used features, and one we have not improved substantially in a long time. With the increasing amount of local storage measured in terabytes, containing photos (in multiple formats and very large files), music, and video, these common operations are being taxed in new ways. These changes, along with consistent feedback about what we could improve, have inspired us to take a fresh look and redesign these operations. Of course this is just one feature among many, but we wanted to start with something we can all relate to. Alex Simons is a director of program management on our Windows engineering team and authored this post on the redesign of some Windows file management basics. (PS: A lot of folks asked about Building Windows 8 Video #1 -- this is the user experience demo, http://win8.ms/uxpreview1. The numbering seems to be confusing so this will be our last numbered video.)--Steven

The article has pictures and a video... so enjoy.

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And @ Redhatter. Command Lines are so 1980's man. They are for the elitist super nerds such as yourself. But aren't really that more productive than navigating with mouse clicks.

As a Windows user who likes my GUI's but also dabbles with linux command lines on my works servers, CLI's have their place, especially in server land. Some things can simply be done way faster via CLI than any GUI ever can. Plus you can do some quite advanced tasks using regular expressions and scripts and things.

 

There's also the advantage of remote connections. CLI's are way better with the bandwidth.

 

GUI's might be easier, but CLI's once learnt can be faster and provide more control. Its just an education thing imo and using/implementing them for the right task.

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I agree. Command line scripts can be really handy. But Linux terminal is in a whole other language. And is anything but easy to understand, read, navigate, and utilise.

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But Linux terminal is in a whole other language. And is anything but easy to understand, read, navigate, and utilise.

Luckily we windows users have powershell :p

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But Linux terminal is in a whole other language. And is anything but easy to understand, read, navigate, and utilise.

Luckily we windows users have powershell :p

 

yeah....

 

But we still have a great GUI. Something Linux doesn't have.

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as of now, there are no reliable sources as to when Microsoft would release win 8. But rumors say it's far better than already-successful win 7. And I think that's a good news for everyone.

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as of now, there are no reliable sources as to when Microsoft would release win 8. But rumors say it's far better than already-successful win 7. And I think that's a good news for everyone.

That can't be right? Isn't it supposed to go good OS, crap OS, good OS...??

 

It is looking quite nice. Some nice additions such as the copy dialog, which really should have been implemented ages ago. Still not to sure what to make of the Metro UI.

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Hmm, I'm just getting used the new ribbon thing on Office 2010 but on explorer in Win 8 is going to be screen space pig on my netbook.

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Hmm, I'm just getting used the new ribbon thing on Office 2010 but on explorer in Win 8 is going to be screen space pig on my netbook.

Haven't you read? You will get an extra 2 files displayed in Windows 8. Just a little bullshit seeing as their showing the Libraries open which has that header.

 

Regardless the ribbon can be minimized and most stuff will be available via right-click context menu or keyboard shortcuts.

Edited by rs727

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Does anyone actually use Libraries? I swear I've never even used them, beyond adding a bunch of folders then forgetting about it.

Depends what you mean by used, I guess. I have to access the Download directory fairly frequently one way or another - the Library entry for that is convenient in that I can arrange for it to do both the public and user version at the same time. The rest I don't use, though.

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I've been through so many cycles of Windows over-hype and under-delivery that I can no longer get excited about any claims being made for the next version of Windows.

 

In my experience MS will screw around with the UI yet again, copy Apple's icon design, bung in a few new utilities, play catch up on the latest computing fad (eg. search for Vista, tablet interfaces for 8), jack the price up 10%, and try to palm it off as some kind of whole new Windows experience.

 

Meh. I still haven't found a compelling reason to move to 7.

Edited by Virtuoso

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Meh. I still haven't found a compelling reason to move to 7.

I did, it was free!

 

I don't see myself getting windows 8, looks like Vista V3 with another new UI.

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Does anyone actually use Libraries? I swear I've never even used them, beyond adding a bunch of folders then forgetting about it.

Depends what you mean by used, I guess. I have to access the Download directory fairly frequently one way or another - the Library entry for that is convenient in that I can arrange for it to do both the public and user version at the same time. The rest I don't use, though.

 

Yeah, they tend to just annoy. I use the desktop for downloads and my own folders for everything else pretty much, although I add things to the libraries on my HTPC.

 

I got a bit of a shock when deploying SBS2011 recently as redirected desktop and documents was on for all profiles by default. It's handy in theory but slow for VPN users especially and actually more trouble than its worth IMO.

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Meh. I still haven't found a compelling reason to move to 7.

I did, it was free!

 

I don't see myself getting windows 8, looks like Vista V3 with another new UI.

 

hehe, looks like something yet has a different UI? Looks nothing like Vista u mean :p (well, not the 'selling point', the new UI, anyway. obviously if you turn off that abstraction it'll look similar to Win7 and Vista).

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Meh. I still haven't found a compelling reason to move to 7.

I did, it was free!

 

I don't see myself getting windows 8, looks like Vista V3 with another new UI.

 

hehe, looks like something yet has a different UI? Looks nothing like Vista u mean :p (well, not the 'selling point', the new UI, anyway. obviously if you turn off that abstraction it'll look similar to Win7 and Vista).

 

I mean't the underlying code, not that the UI looks the same.

Just like Win7 is Vista V2 with an altered UI.

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Meh. I still haven't found a compelling reason to move to 7.

I did, it was free!

 

I don't see myself getting windows 8, looks like Vista V3 with another new UI.

 

hehe, looks like something yet has a different UI? Looks nothing like Vista u mean :p (well, not the 'selling point', the new UI, anyway. obviously if you turn off that abstraction it'll look similar to Win7 and Vista).

 

I mean't the underlying code, not that the UI looks the same.

Just like Win7 is Vista V2 with an altered UI.

 

and vista is an evolution of xp etc etc ;) from what I've read, windows 8 is more of a leap from windows 7 than vista was from xp. Yes there will be much shared, as there needs to be to maintain compatibility. but on the other hand, windows 8 will a better cloud integrated OS.

While that probably doesn't mean anything to you, as far as whether or not it's worthwhile upgrading from windows 7 upon release, it is significant and significantly different from windows 7 (vista V2 as you dubbed it).

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