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n00bile

4tb+ desktop, best solution?

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I have an i2500k, p8p67 pro mobo, 4gb gskill ram, 1tb spinpoint f3, radeon hd6870, seasonic 620w 80plus psu.l

Now i want to put my blu ray collection on here so i can send it to any of my 4 display devices and take the ugly rack out of my home theatre, im going to need another 3+ terabytes.

Not concerned about redundancy apart from the time taken to back them all up, have a 1tb external for anything important.

Now my question is what is the best solution for me, not concered about size noise or heat in a harddrive, case has 7+ bays free.

 

Do i get 4 more spinpoint f3's and raid 0 or 5 them? Do i get 2 2tb f4 green drives?( not raid friendly) Do i wait for samsungs 4gb drive?

 

Cheers

Edited by n00bile

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My suggestion would be to avoid the Ricer's Array of Iffy Disks (aka RAID 0). If you do decide to go down the path of multiple disks with no redundancy, just keep them separate, then if one does, you only loose part of your data, you won't be left with little holes everywhere.

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Listen to redhatter and avoid RAID 0, the must unreliable RAID config. Your data is worth more than a few hundred bucks worth of HDD's! If you're data is that worthless, don't bother keeping it. Instead purge. and therefore you wouldn't need 4TB of space :)

 

I went with RAID 0 in my NAS initially. Overly concerned about read performance. I regretted it and spent a good amount of time grabbing all the data off it and then breaking the array apart, into normal disks.

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I don't really see a problem with raid 0 if its just for storing data he already has on physical media, though it would be a pain having to rip all the movie's again..

Edited by A Hitman

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I don't really see a problem with raid 0 if its just for storing data he already has on physical media, though it would be a pain having to rip all the movie's again..

Yeah. Comes down to money still. If you're ripping from BD to 6GB file size (rather than just storing the BD files on disk) there's a hell of a lot of time involved in converting 4TB worth of media (~600 movies at a many hours each). That's a lot of time wasted. Much more than $400-$500 spend on more drives and decent RAID add on card for RAID 10.

 

Admittedly he did say he wasn't concerned about redundancy...

 

I'm just offering my personal experiences based on first running a HTPC with 1TB (2x500GB in RAID 0) internal to my HTPC since 2007, then 3TB (2 x 1.5TB) RAID 0 on my NAS and then going back to 4TB (2 x 2TB) as 2 normal drives in my HTPC only a few weeks ago. I originally ran RAID 0 because I knew I had backups on disc, but the annoyance factor and the seemingly frequent RAID 0 failures really annoyed me (the RAID 0 NAS never failed but the potiental was there and I needed more space anyway).

 

I really don't think RAID 0 is necessary. At all.

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I said this a long time ago in another thread "So much raid so little recoverable data". I know you say you are not concerned about redundancy, but for me the time it would take to have to replace all those lost files/movies would far outweigh the little increase in performance such a raid set up would give me. After all, as you said, it's mostly for movie play back so is raid really necessary ? Just grab a 4tb drive.

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If you are looking at raiding to get one single big partition then just use JBOD (SPAN). Simpler than raid and if you lose a drive theoretically only the files on that drive and any that span between the different drives will be lost.

Still a bit risky though.

:-)

However I would just grab some Hitachi 3TB Deskstars as they are available now, and then if using Win 7 use the Libraries to "group" all the different video folders under videos.

I have my Win 7 Video library set up this way so all the videos on my HDDs, PVR and WHS server show up in the one "location".

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Should just buy a couple of 2tb drives or two 3tb drives problem solved. No need to put these in raid...

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Do i wait for samsungs 4gb drive?

Why would you do that if you want 4tb?

 

haha see what I did there :)

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I personally prefer a stand alone solution to media storage, not tied into the os or motherboard chipset for raid.

At least using a pci-e sata card (raid?) can be transferred to your next / another rig.

The bigger the drive the greater the loss potential, so 2 x2TB rather than holding out for larger more expensive drives.

That way when 4tb becomes available it's an easy migration. This is usually the start of an ongoing data storage solution so plan for the upgrade.

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The bigger the drive the greater the loss potential, so 2 x2TB rather than holding out for larger more expensive drives.

The smaller the drive, the fewer drives you need, and the fewer potential points of failure. Using, say 2x3TB drives instead of 3x2TB drives (for a 6TB RAID) means an instant 33% reduction in the probability of drive failure.

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The bigger the drive the greater the loss potential, so 2 x2TB rather than holding out for larger more expensive drives.

The smaller the drive, the fewer drives you need, and the fewer potential points of failure. Using, say 2x3TB drives instead of 3x2TB drives (for a 6TB RAID) means an instant 33% reduction in the probability of drive failure.

 

Eh?? I think you got your wording mixed up a bit, you seem to be contradicting yourself. Don't you mean, "The larger the drive, the fewer drives you need, and the fewer potential points of failure."?

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The bigger the drive the greater the loss potential, so 2 x2TB rather than holding out for larger more expensive drives.

The smaller the drive, the fewer drives you need, and the fewer potential points of failure. Using, say 2x3TB drives instead of 3x2TB drives (for a 6TB RAID) means an instant 33% reduction in the probability of drive failure.

 

Eh?? I think you got your wording mixed up a bit, you seem to be contradicting yourself. Don't you mean, "The larger the drive, the fewer drives you need, and the fewer potential points of failure."?

 

No, not at all! I said "smaller" and I meant "smaller."

 

I may, however, have intended to substantially change the rest of that sentence... :-/

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Cheers guys, im going to go with a couple of samsung f4 2tb drives for now, may goto a NAS as some stage once i cant fit anymore harddrives in the computer.

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Cheers guys, im going to go with a couple of samsung f4 2tb drives for now, may goto a NAS as some stage once i cant fit anymore harddrives in the computer.

From what I have been reading I have not been too impressed with the currently available NAS solutions. Either underpowered or overpriced seems the order of the day.

Personally I would do a home made NAS based around regular and easily available PC components.

Then use either FreeNAS (if the hardware is supported) or Windows Home Server.

This way you have more options to configure and customise your hardware to suit your needs.

 

I am currently running a WHS box based around a via MM3500 with an embedded VIA C7 1.5GHz CPU.

 

http://www.pioneercomputers.com.au/product...129&id=2256

All passive cooling with the only fan being the PSU one.

Only running two SATA HDDs ATM as that's all I need but it is a quiet low power unit that does enough.

I have been thinking of building a new one based around say an Atom dual core or similar and set it up as a NAS/server/HTPC possibly housed in an Antec Fusion Remote or something similar.

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