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[The Register] It's the oldest working Seagate drive in the UK

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Seagate reckons it has found the oldest working Seagate disk drive in the UK: a 28-year-old ST-412 disk drive from 1983.

 

It is the drive for an old IBM PC, which booted up when it was brought down from owner Mitch Hansen's attic in his Ruislip house. The 5.25-inch disk has four platters, eight read and write heads, spins at 3,600rpm, weighs 2.1kg (4.1lbs) and holds just 10MB of data. Seagate says it would have cost £263 back in 1983.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/04/06/ol...te_drive_in_uk/

 

That's quite some revolutions, and many years for a HDD. Pity Seagate's more modern drives last a mere fraction of that time.

 

The oldest drives I have here: two MFM-interface Miniscribe, which I believe still work but lack a controller for, and one Rodyme Systems SCSI HDD (made in Scotland), which when I plugged it into my desktop at the time, Windows 2000 happily formatted, to give me a whopping 20MB disk space.

 

Makes me wonder what old drives people have in their systems still going.

Edited by Redhatter

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Pity Seagate's more modern drives last a mere fraction of that time.

Well, with the amount of data they cram into a platter, and the sheer accuracy required to get the things to work, it's a bloody miracle they work at all!

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The oldest drive I have (that I know still works) is an old Quantum Bigfoot. Young by comparison to the UK drive.

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Seagate reckons it has found the oldest working Seagate disk drive in the UK: a 28-year-old ST-412 disk drive from 1983.

 

It is the drive for an old IBM PC, which booted up when it was brought down from owner Mitch Hansen's attic in his Ruislip house. ...

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/04/06/ol...te_drive_in_uk/

 

That's quite some revolutions, and many years for a HDD. Pity Seagate's more modern drives last a mere fraction of that time.

...

 

Umm... there's no indication that the drive has been *running* for 28 years. In fact it came down from some dude's attic, which is where stuff is normally stored while it's not being used, right?

 

Still cool that it remains operational, but I somehow doubt that it has ~ 245 000 hours of running time under its belt. Having said that I am now curious about the actual MTBF of those old drives vs. the projected MTBF of modern drives - and once enough time has passed it would be good to see both how the projected and actual MTBF has changed over time, as well as the relationship between actual and projected MTBF.

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Hah, we had a BigFoot. I believe it was in the 486 that DonutKing picked up from here.

I think so, although I haven't bothered to power it up yet... its stashed away until I can find a home for it :(

 

I do have a working Seagate ST251 MFM drive and controller though- build date week 25 1988 - still goes although it needs a bit of a thump to get running when its cold.

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Still have 2 old 80GB PATA drives from Seagate and I still use them... >>

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With old HDDs, the bearings in the spindle would normally fail before the data surfaces or the arm assembly.

 

I used to have this 80MB HDD of an unknown brand, and towards the end of its life, it went from a quiet whizzing sound to a loud whine. Right up to the end it otherwise worked perfectly, no bad sectors, no ticking, it just didn't start one day.

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With old HDDs, the bearings in the spindle would normally fail before the data surfaces or the arm assembly.

 

I used to have this 80MB HDD of an unknown brand, and towards the end of its life, it went from a quiet whizzing sound to a loud whine. Right up to the end it otherwise worked perfectly, no bad sectors, no ticking, it just didn't start one day.

I guess with modern hard drives you get some warning it's going pack it in. The old drives had no system of checking the health of drive.

Edited by Jeruselem

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I have a 3.2gb WD that needs a tap with a screw driver on power on to get going. But my IBM Deskstar 9.1GB is still going beautifully, noisy little sucker though (they were never quiet).

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I have a 3.2gb WD that needs a tap with a screw driver on power on to get going. But my IBM Deskstar 9.1GB is still going beautifully, noisy little sucker though (they were never quiet).

That got me thinking, what plumbing shop to you visit to get a tap which has a screw driver built in? Ohh dear.

 

Sounds like bearings are probably wearing out, and that little "tap" is just enough to assist the spindle motor in overcoming that initial start-up friction.

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My media center is running a Seagate 120GB PATA drive that is about 8 years old.

It runs near silent 24/7.

 

Edit: Added brand of drive.

Edited by viremia

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