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Nich...

Fortified Wines

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I'm not a big wine person, in that I can drink and like wine, but I don't drink and like enough wine to appreciate a lot of the nuances and subtleties. Which is fine, it's something to work on over time. I am more partial to fortified wines, and have many fond memories of just smelling some Brown Brothers port at family events (usually a blend of the tawny and special reserve, from memory), too young to even drink it. I've not had too many sherries, but I've enjoyed a BB creamy one, and this little gem that Fuzz picked up:

 

Posted Image

 

It's clearly more expensive than a BB sherry, and especially more expensive than McWilliams, which I consider to generally be cheap, and sometimes nasty. It's also awesome, and I felt like I was sipping in liquified raisins. Distilled carrot cake (ice-cream).

 

I'm also partial to, but haven't had much, of muscats and tokays.

 

Do you have any suggestions?

 

This is mostly to do with improving my own collection, but, you know, I'm not going to complain if it helps with other things, too.

Edited by Nich...

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Morris of Rutherglen do a pretty good tokay and muscat - the vintage ones can be obtained from most Dan Murphy stores for ~$50

 

--edit--

Here are the tasting notes by the judges for wine tasting I recently went to:

 

Muscat

 

Tokay

 

They were paired with a chocolate creme brulee. Labels of the wines are shown in the links.

Edited by Malkieri

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I have a preference for Vintage Port. Try a Chateau Reynella but try to get one with at least 20 years aging on it.

Decant it properly or run it through a filter (a coffee filter paper will do) before drinking or you'll get a lot of sediment in the glass. The sediment will taste vile and will ruin the flavour of the wine.

 

You might also try some Buller's Fine Old Muscat - doesn't need aging. They have a Tokay as well but I prefer the Muscat.

 

BedeM

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Sweet sherry mixed with some coke isn't so bad.

 

My dad drinks McWilliams flagons like they're going out of fashion so I also kind of have acquired the taste.

/

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As well as the Spanish PX up above, I'm contemplating the following additions:

 

Local Sherry:

Seppeltsfield Flora Pale Dry Fino DP117

 

Local Port:

Seppeltsfield Para Grand Tawny

Yalumba Museum Release Antique Tawny

 

I was thinking of sticking to Rutherglen for some other fortifieds, like a muscat and a tokay. The reviews of the Morris ones above is making me lean towards, say, the Cellar Reserve Grand Tokay and the Cellar Reserve Grand Muscat, as a compromise on price.

 

If anyone's had personal experience with them, or has others to recommend, it'll help when I get to doing some legwork to try all of these out. I'm also a little unsure on whether I'm really covering the depth of character available in the styles that I have more than one entry for.

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Try Di Bortolli - Noble One. A type of very sweet (almost dessert) wine that's made with grapes that have been affected by the Bortrytis cinerea fungus (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Botrytis_cinerea) which creates an unusual concentration of sugar within the grapes. It's very nice, you'll probably like it. As for port, well, put most good liquors in the right kind of glass and you'll appreciate them a lot more. I know that some would say it's sacrilege for them to be used for anything but what they were intended for, but, I put most anything worth drinking neat in a tall or balloon glass to enjoy the flavour. It was how I discovered that my Glenmorangie Signet had caramel added to it and why I'm unhappy with them for that insult. Should have been additive free. Bastards.

Edited by Mudman

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I don't consider botrytis, late harvest, and ice wines to be fortified, tho' that isn't stopping me from getting one of each for the non-fortified dessert selection.

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vintage portuguese ports are where its at if you want something different. imo they offer a complexity far greater then whats on offer of the ports you get here.

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Here's a really good idea. Why doesn't everyone just settle the fuck down?

 

Having a go at someone for suggesting something that is a little off base is pretty off. And whatever happened years ago is not relevant to either this conversation or conversations on these forums.

 

I've hidden the posts in the interests of keeping on topic and general civility.

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Ermm... My post was hardly vitriolic... Far from it, i thought.

 

 

It was however clarifying that some of the wines suggested weren't fortified, but were of a subsection of wines considered (by nearly everyone...) to be 'stickies'.

 

 

 

 

edit: as qualification that i wasn't just talking out of my arse, my family owns a vineyard, and has been in the industry for the last 20+ years.

Edited by Caelum

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http://nicks.com.au/Product/View/Pertaring...-(500ml)/478733

 

Looks nice. I might see if I can grab a bottle.

 

I also still have a bottle of New Norcia Abbey muscat sitting here from my trip to WA -- if any WAans feel like bringing over more next time they go cross-continental I'd be happy to take it off their hands. So, I suspect, would Nich (although apparently the bakery is also quite good, so Nich might have to be the one to take a trip).

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I had my eye on that Pertaringa, actually! And maybe a Portuguese Port, tho' it's possibly a little pricey for me, at $50 for a half-sized bottle.

Edited by Nich...

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Out of curiosity, what is a 'normal' serving size for a fortified wine?

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Thanks, wasn't sure if it was 50 or 60.

 

And, sort of related, is it common for dessert wines, not-fortified, to be served in 90ml increments? Or are sauternes and their ilk served in the more typical 150ml servings of white wine?

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I think 150ml of a dessert wine would be too much, for me. Though i'm not a real big fan of them anyway. They have their place though, for sure.

 

I'd probably prefer 90ml, for a dessert wine. Having not drunk many in a restaurant though, i'm not sure what the norm is.

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Thanks, wasn't sure if it was 50 or 60.

 

And, sort of related, is it common for dessert wines, not-fortified, to be served in 90ml increments? Or are sauternes and their ilk served in the more typical 150ml servings of white wine?

 

So my enjoyment of dessert wines filling an oversized brandy snifter probably isn't kosher?

 

Damn. :(

 

:P

 

http://www.save-on-crafts.com/giantbrandy.html

 

:)

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It's not a snifter if it fits your whole port barrel in there : )~

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As a somewhat belated followup on this, I ended up getting the Mr Pickwicks and Seppeltsfield Grand Para ports, the Petaringa Full Fronti muscat, the Valdespino El Candado PX, some Delgado Zuleta Manzanilla, and a Seppeltsfield Grand Tokay.

 

And for the non-fortified dessert wines I nabbed a bottle of St John Commandaria, Long Gully's ice riesling, and a Chateau du Cros loupiac.

 

The PX is still my favourite. The Mr Pickwick went nice as a port and chocolate kind of thing, tho' I kind of think it's overpriced for what it essentially is. The others were all nice enough, tho' I think I need to convince myself to spend more time with the la Goya, or just generally fino type sherry - it tasted weak and yeasty to me.

 

Pondering getting some Chambers or Morris fortifieds in the muscat/tokay family later this year, when i go on a fortified wine binge with a friend. And lots of port. I might treat myself and finally get in an aged bottle from Portugal, just for a completely contrasting style. And probably a few more varieties of nicer sherry - I like the sound of the rancio notes that sherry (and port) are meant to pick up while oxidising during aging, but I've not really experienced it in a way I found memorable (if at all).

 

Open once again to suggestions.

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