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smegg

1st quantum computer sold...

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10 million a computer sounds fairly reasonable don't it? I thought it would cost alot more.

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does it work? if it does i want one, and a copy of cyrisis2

That's the sad bit about IT:

 

Imagine that Cray computer decides to make a personal computer. It has

a 150 MHz processor, 200 megabytes of RAM, 1500 megabytes of disk

storage, a screen resolution of 4096 x 4096 pixels, relies entirely on

voice recognition for input, fits in your shirt pocket and costs $300.

What's the first question that the computer community asks?

 

"Is it PC compatible?"

(That quote was written I remember reading that quote in the days when 100MHz computers with 16MB RAM and 1GB HDDs were "state of the art".)

 

Edit: Search on the first line suggests this might be the source of the above quote. Linux users can find it by installing the fortune-mod package and running fortune -m Cray. If that is the correct source, then the quote is older as I am (by about a fortnight).

Edited by Redhatter

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Hacking the multiverse site is all about coding for quantum computers, it's gonna be a pretty sweet future for computers coming up soon ^

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Not to sound paranoid, but it states that quantum computing all but renders high end encryption obsolite...wanna bet that ASIS have ordered one? Might have to find new ways to store all my PR on...

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Not to sound paranoid, but it states that quantum computing all but renders high end encryption obsolite...wanna bet that ASIS have ordered one? Might have to find new ways to store all my PR on...

Just to feed the paranoia, I doubt they would tell us if they had.

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quantum computers will obsolete current encryption methods, but it will also enable new encryption that would be secure beyond all imagining.

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This isn't the sort of quantum computer that makes encryption obsolete. It relies on being able to pose your problem as a complex Hamiltonian equation, quite a different beast than one which runs the encryption smashing algorithm.

 

Still pretty damn cool tho :)

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first thing i was going to ask was how this thing would do for cracking encrypted stuff.. wouldnt the US govt be getting one before lockhead martin? lol

Edited by B82R3S

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first thing i was going to ask was how this thing would do for cracking encrypted stuff.. wouldnt the US govt be getting one before lockhead martin? lol

probably have a dozen at NSA headquarters

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does it work?

Yes and no.

 

;)

 

Ah, but to really replicate its actions, you need to type yes and no really really fast - ideally so fast you are typing both at the same time...yneos

 

:)

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Will the old games like counter strike and red alert run on this computer?

 

Pretty dumb question eh... lol

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does it work?

Yes and no.

 

;)

 

Until you try it. Then it definitely does or definitely does not?

 

The article precisely states that high qubit-count quantum computers may render modern encryption pointless.

I don't think 128 qubit computers will do it.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shor's_algorithm

 

Have a read.

It's not been demonstrated to work, other than a 7-bit machine factoring 15.

Hardly impressive.

As far as I understand, the difficulty still scales, it's just that that's MILES better than what we currently use. So instead of being a brute-force to work out the best factors, it's more akin to a quick-sort.

It might still be a quick-sort of trillions of entities, if the encryption key is big.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shor's_algorithm

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does it work?

Yes and no.

 

;)

 

Until you try it. Then it definitely does or definitely does not?

 

Yes. At the same time.

 

"Certainty? We don' need no steenkin' certainty!"

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Any benchmarking?

What benchmarks would you suggest that would make sense? Bearing in mind that this system is not an IBM PC Compatible running Windows.

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Yup. it's like comparing an apple to a toaster at this stage.

 

Why people try to compare the two at the moment is ridiculous :/

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Yup. it's like comparing an apple to a toaster at this stage.

 

Why people try to compare the two at the moment is ridiculous :/

I suppose it's because, to a lot of people, a "computer" is a thing with a monitor, keyboard, mouse and system unit (sometimes these are combined) which runs Windows. Or if it doesn't run Windows, it must be a mac.

 

Gets them horribly confused when they see a machine like my Yeeloong.

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Wow, last I read they'd only got 8 particles to play nice together. TBH my understanding of the quantum computer is a bit shaky. It's all very well to laugh at people asking about running games and framerates, but I still have only a vague idea of what quantum computers do. I'd love more info...?

 

My vague understanding of their uses is in instantaneous communication (that's instant not quick). Which is only really useful over vast distances (manned mission to Mars) because related particles change state instantaneously. So anstible (instantaneous interstellar communications) technology - if only we had a use for this. Although I guess instantaneous communication between computer components could have its uses.

 

Also in the decription area, because, the particles are also all states at once, and thus can try all combinations simultaneously. My understanding of that idea is even shakier. Quantum mechanic ideas are slippery, and anyone who can understand them, let alone work in the field, has my respect. Any other info would bein layman's terms would be appreciated.

Edited by TazFromOz

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Well no, speed of light is still the speed of light regardless of how far apart the endpoints are, and quantum computers do not change that.

 

The differences are more in how they represent data which gives them the significant computing power advantage over traditional electronic computers.

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