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Trekker

samsung galaxy s2

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Dude, have a look at the specs, the latest model is far superior to previous models and far superior to any android smartphone on the market. You say you have never seen the previous Android OS show any signs of lag. I say you are either drunk, retarded, blind or all of the above.

There's more processing power, setting the benchmark for smartphones to come. There's far more storage. There's more RAM and you say you have less RAM on your XP machine....well that's nice, thanks for telling us. RAM for a smartphone is quite important.

It can record video in 1080p....show me an N Gage that can do that?

 

There's even been an Android developer in this thread telling you it is far better from a development stand point and you choose to ignore him.

Are you out of your fucking mind?

l2read and come back

 

i listened and said its better from a dev point. Im not a dev, so it doesnt interest me. 2.2 is widespread enough that dev is unlikely to stop too quickly.

Also why whould I care? Once you have the 2 or 3 apps you need installed, you never care again.

Everyone with an app store goes app crazy for the first week, then gets their favorites and just enjoys how its set up.

 

and yay! tech specs! good for it! My question still stands.

 

and yeah, never seen lag on the previous Galaxy phone. I guess im all of the above, or your rom is bloated.

 

 

Will you stop comparing it to an ngage? I only brought it up because i notice the software to do all the above existed back then, and with the exception of adding touch screen support, still does the same shit in the same way! as i said, that was a comically extremist example.

 

So, i repeat myself for the 3rd or fourth time: WOW nice tech specs, nice 'oh yeah, well... read these numbers!' What do you do on your S2 that your S1 cant? I know its hard for the uppity crowd here but try not to be petty crybabies about it and use some logic when listing how important anyhting you decide on really is.

Edited by Master_Scythe

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image

Thats a QD, it didnt even do stereo sound. Fuck that noise.

 

Curiously, hows the scene for bluetooth LAN gaming on Android? I miss that form ngage days. playing Worms Armageddon or Snake3D across the room via bluetooth was fun.

 

 

Also, nice question dodge.

Edited by Master_Scythe

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Pfft, who needs stereo sound? What's wrong with normal sound. Come on man, who would pay over inflated prices for stereo sound! What a waste of money!

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Pfft, who needs stereo sound? What's wrong with normal sound. Come on man, who would pay over inflated prices for stereo sound! What a waste of money!

The QD was more expensive. Your argument is uneducated

AND makes my point nicely :)

QD vs Classic - Cheaper, slightly older, but better. Case and point.

Edited by Master_Scythe

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This hurts my brain.

 

MS, you're just as guilty as anyone for not listening and taking in.

 

To add some discussion, I still own a Motorola V3XX for a phone, it does all I need, but I 100% agree with Twinny and Cyber on the matter.

 

 

This is almost as fun as the time you thought getting a Nitrous kit on some 3cyl suzuki or w/e to help drag people in town was a good idea.

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When the iPad was first announced a lot of people said "What a pointless device. It's like an iPhone, only bigger and I can't make calls on it!"

And I will put cash money on it that MS was one of those people.

 

 

What most people did not get was that it opened the doors to a land of opportunity. All of a sudden enterprise developers took notice. The iOS platform was not just for making pointless applications. With the processing power and the extra screen real estate, developers could introduce more complex and business ready applications.

This is where the money is at and this is what assists businesses to grow and increase profits and productivity.

 

The Samsung Galaxy S2 is not about whether it can play games and or movies. It is about Samsung branching out from the consumer market into the enterprise market.

With its powerful specs it appeals to enterprise customers. For the first time since ever, I have had a number of customers wanting to introduce Android as a smartphone as well as iPads....because of their potential to help their business grow. Because of the potential for business applications.

 

 

MS, you can bang on about your N Gage all you like. Piss and moan about the S2 not being a leap ahead, but it is quite evident that you have zero idea about that which you speak.

I don't know how else to get it through your thick skull. So before I seriously offend you, I will go and make myself some breakfast.

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This hurts my brain.

 

MS, you're just as guilty as anyone for not listening and taking in.

And I think that summarises this thread pretty well.

 

How about we all move along then.

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This is almost as fun as the time you thought getting a Nitrous kit on some 3cyl suzuki or w/e to help drag people in town was a good idea.

I just wanted a reason to bitch about not being allowed it; and making up excuses is always fun around here. Its the only way to guarantee a good argument these days :D lol. I was convinced early on it wouldnt work, but hey, if i conceded the argument stops. Where's the fun in that?

 

 

When the iPad was first announced a lot of people said "What a pointless device. It's like an iPhone, only bigger and I can't make calls on it!"

And I will put cash money on it that MS was one of those people.

 

 

What most people did not get was that it opened the doors to a land of opportunity. All of a sudden enterprise developers took notice. The iOS platform was not just for making pointless applications. With the processing power and the extra screen real estate, developers could introduce more complex and business ready applications.

This is where the money is at and this is what assists businesses to grow and increase profits and productivity.

 

The Samsung Galaxy S2 is not about whether it can play games and or movies. It is about Samsung branching out from the consumer market into the enterprise market.

With its powerful specs it appeals to enterprise customers. For the first time since ever, I have had a number of customers wanting to introduce Android as a smartphone as well as iPads....because of their potential to help their business grow. Because of the potential for business applications.

 

 

MS, you can bang on about your N Gage all you like. Piss and moan about the S2 not being a leap ahead, but it is quite evident that you have zero idea about that which you speak.

I don't know how else to get it through your thick skull. So before I seriously offend you, I will go and make myself some breakfast.

You're old and stuck in circular thought arent you? What does the Ngage have to do with the S2? lol. That was simply a 'my uses are filled long ago' example, and i let it go, you seem to be in love with it.

 

OK, so from your description, you're claiming its a great leap in 'the industry' and its a great leap for devs?

I can agree to that.

 

The Samsung Galaxy S2 is not about whether it can play games and or movies.

For the end user, I think it is!

And on that point I still stand for the consumer its a great 'ho hum'.

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I embrace new technology and I have eyes for the future. What's old hat about that?

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My other mate walks in with his S2. Holds it out and declares how awesome it is. I take it away for a couple of hours to mess with; after I bring it back, I couldnt find anything it could do the tab couldnt.

 

Every app, every task, every utility, and i noticed no lag on either. "Wow mate thats awesome, congratulations!" all while thinking "What does this one do that the cheaper one doesnt?"

From a dev point, fair enough, from a user perspective, please tell me someone can understand WTF i'm getting at.

CPU: 1GHz single core A8 vs 1.2GHz dual core A9

Ive never seen lag on the S1 or tab, why the dual core?

RAM: 512MB vs 1GB

Its a mobile device. My PDA\old XP machine has less ram. Even running all the above description I noticed no 'out of memory errors' on the S1\tab

RE the RAM. Install a few apps (especially ones that run as/with a service) and the RAM usage climbs. My phone currently is using 49% of it's available RAM (420MB left, so some must be reserved for OS/GPU) That's before I even get to running games or any other apps like browsers etc.

Storage: 8GB vs 16GB

Fair enough; Im a memory card guy. This is valid for some people though.

 

Battery: 1.5Ah vs 1.65Ah

I'll admit this, but 'slightly bigger battery' is not a huge price justifier

Camera: 5MP vs 8MP

Irrelivant on such a tiny sensor.

Video capture: 720p vs 1080p

See above

Extra bits GS1 lacks: HDMI out over MHL, OTG, NFC (if you include Korean GS2 variants), HSPA+ connectivity.

Which are all very neat; but I do ask once again who will miss this on a DAILY (eg. price justifiable) level. Admittedly there will be a few. there always is. But I'm confident the majority will never use it as more than a 'phone with apps'

Watching a streaming TV show over the NextG network whilst on your DAILY train commute? NFC, use DAILY instead of credit cards, possibly less chance of fraud? OTG, copy work files from peoples USB sticks to your phone for editing/review on the go? Sales rep putting a demo video on his phone and uses it to display via HDMI a presentation?

 

Just because you can't see a need for these things doesn't mean others can't.

Ive never seen such a huge backlash from "great device, but not worth the price hike" before. Fuck!

The reason I put the spec differences down, was mainly to show why it costs so much more. New (better) tech costs more, simple. How you justify wanting or not wanting it after that is another matter.

 

Ok, I agree with you that if you had an GS1 or similarly capable device, upgrading to the GS2 wouldn't provide much benefit on top of what you already have. If you had an Android 1.6 device (that couldn't be upgraded to 2.x) it might be worth it simply for the OS improvements.

 

With my purchase of the GS2 I was coming from an N97. Whilst the N97 was good for it's time it was still slow and the symbian platform is essentially dead. Couple that with the fact that I hang on to my phones for at least 2 years (N97 would've lasted longer but after seeing an Android in action I realised how slow and clunky this thing was), if I get something well specced it'll "keep up with the Johns's", and my expectations for longer.

 

Phones are quite personal things. One device that suits one person often mightn't suit another. Often it's down to what features you need vs what ones you can do without for the price you want. If you had the option of swapping your current device for a GS2 at no extra cost, I'm sure you'd have a hard time turning the offer down.

 

Perhaps in a year or mores time the GS2 will be more main stream in feature set and thus price and would be more amenable to your price range preferences. Who knows, if your phone dies or you want something newer your next phone might well be something along this things specs.

 

You prefer saving money and getting something that'll achieve only what you need. When I buy expensive things I tend to look at what has more than what I need so that they may last me longer and may even surprise me occasionally with what they can do down the track. Neither way is right or wrong, it's just what we prefer.

 

With that, can everyone show a little more respect to each other in here? :)

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mark84, well said.

There will always be some market for new features. agree 100%.

 

I think the proof will be in the pudding and arguing over how much is 'useful' will be proven in the long run.

 

As I currently still love my E63 (purely because android wont offer a decent hardware keyboard), i notice probably 10+ people a day with the E63\71\72 (all various little tweaks of each other). Clearly a successful budget phone.

You look around and see the iphone everywhere. Somewhere someone is fingering their screen - clearly a very successful expensive device.

And I often see people playing with an android tab more than an ipad on trains and busses - clearly the budget factor has won out here.

 

This argument has stepped away from my inital point anyway. I'll give it 3 or so months and see how many people on the train are playing with S2's.

 

I catch it daily, and use busses sometimes too. Considering everyone likes to whip out their smart device on public transport, it'll be pretty easy to build myself a 'sample' of how needed and thusly popular the S2 really is :)

Im happy for the results to go either way; and if i notice more S2's than other smart phones, i'll start asking the strangers why they chose it; just so i can learn too :)

 

Thanks for the discussion all. THATS what a forum should be :)

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Horses for courses.

You monitor people on the train playing games, where as I read analyst reports, i.e IDC, Gartner (these are certainly not the be all and end all) etc etc. I monitor business needs, pain points and requirements.

 

You're looking at it purely from a consumer perspective. I am looking at it from a business perspective.

One thing I will say about Android, is the openness of it's platform, is what is causing slow uptake. Security. Security. Security. I'm working directly with Samsung, wrapping our security and mobile device management software around their devices to help them go to market and tackle the enterprise world.

 

As I said, horses yada yada.

 

Game over. The end.

Edited by twinair

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MS -

Had a wall-o-text, but I think it's pretty much been covered already: your opinion differs to that of other people. Deal with it and quit your whining.

Although I agree with you in principle and my purchases are similar to yours in many ways (I buy for adequacy and value rather than maximum performance), I appreciate that it's the enthusiast market that pushes tech ahead such that my affordable, adequate tech still keeps getting better and better over time.

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One thing I will say about Android, is the openness of it's platform, is what is causing slow uptake. Security. Security. Security. I'm working directly with Samsung, wrapping our security and mobile device management software around their devices to help them go to market and tackle the enterprise world.

I'd say the "openness" is not quite that open.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/03/31/go...droid_partners/

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Wall of text warning...

 

The gist of it is, there are pros and cons to open source. Enterprise adoption is typically slow with open source platforms. Android being a prime example.

 

http://opensource.sys-con.com/node/1852091

 

 

A lot of talk has been circulating lately about security issues in Android. Should anyone really be surprised to discover that an open source system is not only open to legitimate developers but also to hackers? Is it reasonable to expect that a system developed and maintained by thousands of heterogeneous developers can be relied upon to behave reasonably well under all circumstances?

The concept of open source is very appealing. Highly talented developers have created tremendous products and generously shared them with the rest of us. Individual developers are not at issue here. The issue is with the concept of building critical systems on an unsupported framework such as Android.

Having spent a good deal of time porting Android to our DevTouch Pro tablet (www.devtouchpro.com), I had the chance to take a deep look at the internals of Android and its underlying Linux kernel. I also had to support our team of developers in finding solutions to the myriad of issues that we faced.

 

Here are some of the difficulties that we encountered, that irremediably shook my belief that Android is a viable operating system:

 

The first major hurdle is that there is a split between the Linux Kernel and the Android Kernel. At some point in time, Linux Kernel developers decided to kick out Android developers for various reasons. Device developers ended up with two sets of source-code to deal with. Some functionality and fixes became available in one set but not the other.

 

 

The lack of centralized or properly maintained documentation is a real nightmare to both newcomers and experienced developers. Googling the Web trying to understand the source of an error or a crash produces tons of useless forum posts and mailing lists, outdated blog articles and incomprehensible developer jargon that never get you anywhere. To Google documentation for explaining the internals of the OS, or how to adapt it to a device, is either nonexistent or completely outdated.

 

 

On top of nonexistent documentation, there is no one to whom one can submit an issue or ask a question and expect a meaningful answer. Use at your own risk says the license, and the concept applies very well to open source Android.

 

 

Many developers have resorted to all kinds of hacks to resolve their issues - browsing through thousand of lines of source code and applying workarounds here and there without ever knowing if there will be side-effects to the changes being made. The end result: Android phones that have to be rebooted three times a day, phones that refuse to start, applications that behave erratically and security issues that keep popping up here and there that make the headlines.

Many analysts have predicted a great future to Android. I am not sure these analysts have ever looked beneath the hood. I see Android as being doomed unless Google takes a serious approach to making it anything more than an experiment. Close down the code, do a complete review, charge a license fee, provide documentation and customer support. This is the only way that this system is going to survive.

 

Caveat Emptor!

Edited by twinair

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+1 to that.

 

They also need to lock down the market Apple style (perhaps a little more lax) to strip out all the crap. There's always sideloading and 3rd party app stores for lazy developers.

Edited by .:Cyb3rGlitch:.

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hmm interesting read.

Do you think the larger players in the market Sony, Samsung, HTC etc will start keeping their own "split" of the android versions?

and develop them according to their own needs?

 

edit: Not sure if what i wrote conveys what i mean to ask. Eg they will have their own source of code, drivers, utils, frameworks etc that they will refine and bolt in / inject / intergrate into each release as needed?

Edited by Josho

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It's already happening. Whether it will stay that way is unclear.

For example, the work that I'm doing on Android at the moment, the APIs made available to me from Samsung, using their particular flavour of Android, are far greater than any other Android on the market. I can completely rape that device, but cannot with other Androids...using our software anyway.

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It's already happening. Whether it will stay that way is unclear.

For example, the work that I'm doing on Android at the moment, the APIs made available to me from Samsung, using their particular flavour of Android, are far greater than any other Android on the market. I can completely rape that device, but cannot with other Androids...using our software anyway.

So in a sense it's fragmenting even more?

By the sounds of it whoever samsung have running their android integration they should hang on too.

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I wouldn't say fragmenting more. It's already fragmented. But yeah as my article points out above, something needs to be done if Android is going to be a serious contender.

Hard for the likes of me to keep under control. But, there's two sides to this fence.

 

Do you want uniformity, control and consistency?

If yes, see Apple.

You want open source and freedom?

If yes, see Android. But beware it's going to be fkn messy.

 

A lot of folk jump up and down and hate Apple and their procedures, but it is for the best.

iOS is iOS.

Android isn't always Android

Edited by twinair

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