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Intel's Sandy Bridge-E Series Thread

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Similar to SceptreCore's thread on AMD's Bulldozer and Fusion Architecture

 

Seeing as more and more info is coming about about Intel's new high end chips, I thought I'd make a new thread, so the information can be centralised

 

Some older information on it here (mainly to do with the chipsets accompanying these chips)

 

Posted Image

 

Some new information I have found recently:

 

Intel To Still Launch Sandy Bridge-E in 2011, But With Reduced Platform Feature-Set

 

Sandy Bridge-E Model Numbers, Clock Speeds Surface

 

Feel free to continue posting news related to these chips here :-)

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I bet everyone on here saying oh I will wait for SB E series and be smart will have to buy like a $7-800 chip if they want to overclock and a $1200 chip if they want the extreme edition which is pretty much what intel always does.

Edited by nesquick

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The pricepoint of current SB parts should be an indication that intel don't need $1200 chips.

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well no look at the chips they are replacing ;) if the 25/2500k's were being replaced then yeah they would be cheap but like I said knowing intel they will just charge a massive premium for the high end part of which I think the X58 platform is still considered by Intel to be more high end than P67/Z68.

 

not trying to start an argument here just putting it how historically Intel has priced its components.

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I knew i should have waited...

 

Instead i just had to go and spend $580 for my i7 970 >.>

 

Oh well, i can wait a year or so and then upgrade once there has been some good real world testing of the new processors :D

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I knew i should have waited...

 

Instead i just had to go and spend $580 for my i7 970 >.>

 

Oh well, i can wait a year or so and then upgrade once there has been some good real world testing of the new processors :D

Your i7 970 will kick ass for a long while.

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well no look at the chips they are replacing ;) if the 25/2500k's were being replaced then yeah they would be cheap but like I said knowing intel they will just charge a massive premium for the high end part of which I think the X58 platform is still considered by Intel to be more high end than P67/Z68.

 

not trying to start an argument here just putting it how historically Intel has priced its components.

Indeed, hopefully they have a hex core part that does the same as the $1000 cpu for $300, like usual.

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Your i7 970 will kick ass for a long while.

Yeh i know, my old i7 920 is still pretty decent especialy when overclocked to 3.8Ghz, so im expecting to get a good run out of my i7 970 as well, still i seem to be a compulsive upgrader, i very rarely go more then 2 years without doing a totaly new build. and i tend to upgrade graphics around every 12-16 months.

 

I honestly dont know how i afford to do this >.> but my new computer proves i do it somehow!

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surely for gamers these cpus would be total overkill? for 90% of people on the desktop front an overclocked 17 2600k is complete overkill. Not that I dont think these cpus will be amazing - the intel top end has been stellar for a quite while now - but I do agree with nesquick that performance is gonna come at a huge price because the i5/7's are already at a good price point for intel and people are still gonna be buying them, unless the 4 core snadybridge e is going to be only +$100 on an 2600k and beats it into the ground.

 

Still I look forward to seeing just how beastly these things are, with any luck we may get a game that will actually utilise the power of one of these cpus and the $1500 worth of GFX cards someone bought to accompany it. Battlefield 3 maybe?

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I knew i should have waited...

 

Instead i just had to go and spend $580 for my i7 970 >.>

 

Oh well, i can wait a year or so and then upgrade once there has been some good real world testing of the new processors :D

Your i7 970 will kick ass for a long while.

 

hell, if these chips are to much then im just going to jump on a 6 core i7 and wait for a while.

 

i'd love a i7 970!..but intel doesnt make them anymore..:P

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Nice thread btw nobobdy :) Agree that unless there's some serious optimizing and speed bumps (or the benches are all lies) it looks increasingly unlikely that BD will quite match up to SnB-E - however it should be closer (I think) than Thuban ever got, so I'd say at the least Intel will have to look over their shoulder and leave prices at a reasonable-ish level. That having been said if neither SnB-E nor BD rock the party with their extra cores, Z68/SnB starts looking tempting again; given Ivy Bridge's relatively close release, speed bumps and compatibility with current 1155 boards - the only issue really would be dual card setups.

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SB-E should alleviate all the current shortfalls of 1155, looking forward to it.

 

Fixes RAM Banwidth (no moar dual channel)

Fixes PCIE from the get go

Introduces hex chips.

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I knew i should have waited...

 

Instead i just had to go and spend $580 for my i7 970 >.>

 

Oh well, i can wait a year or so and then upgrade once there has been some good real world testing of the new processors :D

Your i7 970 will kick ass for a long while.

 

hell, if these chips are to much then im just going to jump on a 6 core i7 and wait for a while.

 

i'd love a i7 970!..but intel doesnt make them anymore..:P

 

If i upgrade to the new chips when they come out ill sell you my old i7 970? :D

 

i cant see myself upgrading unless they are some kinda crazy good though...

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Intel To Still Launch Sandy Bridge-E in 2011, But With Reduced Platform Feature-Set

 

Sandy Bridge-E is Intel's next-generation high-end desktop and enterprise platform that is an upscale of the Sandy Bridge platform the company launched early this year. At this year's major trade-shows such as Computex, motherboard partners displayed their socket LGA2011 motherboards with the complete feature-set of the platform. Apart from the large socket, and memory slots at odd places, the most distinct feature of those motherboards was the plethora of SATA ports they came with. Even the most [relatively] low-end LGA2011 motherboards had around 10 SATA ports, most of which were 6 Gb/s. Platform schematics also made it to the public domain around that time, revealing a key feature that makes driving 8 SATA 6 Gb/s ports possible: a supplementary PCI-Express 3.0 x4 link between the X79 PCH and the LGA2011 processor, that adds 16 GB/s (8 GB/s per direction) of bandwidth between the processor and the chipset, without which the storage controller would be severely bottlenecked with the DMI Gen2 (physical PCI-Express 2.0 x4), with its puny 8 GB/s (4 GB/s per direction) bandwidth.

 

Originally slated for Q4 2011, Intel's Sandy Bridge-E platform was reported to have been delayed to Q1 2012. It is now emerging that Patsburg-D, the variant of Patsburg X79 chipset, which features 8 SATA/SAS 6 Gb/s ports, which requires that supplementary PCI-E 3.0 x4 link, may be causing a development hold up at Intel. So, the company is planning on launching the platform this year itself, but with Patsburg-B, a variant of the chipset that has only four SATA/SAS 6 Gb/s ports, and relies entirely on DMI as the chipset interconnect. The slide below lists out differences between the many variants of Patsburg PCH. DMI would give the platform the same amount of chipset interconnect bandwidth as today's LGA1155-Cougar Point platform. It is, however possible that the higher Patsburg-D/X variants will be launched when Intel irons out whatever issues exist with them.

http://www.techpowerup.com/149224/Intel-To...eature-Set.html

 

Sandy Bridge-E Model Numbers, Clock Speeds Surface

 

Before we move to the model numbers, here's a quick run up of the brand extenders. "X" denotes Extreme Edition, "K" denotes "Unlocked" (BClk multipler unlocked). Leading the pack will be Core i7-3960X Extreme Edition. This six-core (6 cores, 12 threads with HTT) chip has a nominal clock speed of 3.30 GHz, Turbo Boost speed of up to 3.90 GHz, and features the full 15 MB of L3 cache present on the Sandy Bridge-E silicon. Expect this chip to have a four figure price-tag.

 

Next up, is the Core i7-3930K, with 6 cores, 12 threads, a nominal clock speed of 3.20 GHz, and Turbo Boost speed of 3.80 GHz; but 12 MB of L3 cache compared to 15 MB on the Extreme Edition chip. This chip features an unlocked BClk multiplier, making overclocking it possible.

 

The most affordable LGA2011 chip will be Core i7-3820, with 4 cores, 8 threads, nominal clock speed of 3.60 GHz, Turbo speed of 3.90 GHz, and just 10 MB of L3 cache. Unlike the other two, this one has its BClk multiplier locked. All three models feature quad-channel DDR3 memory controllers, but it is likely that the lower-end models could also have lower DRAM multiplier limits. All three chips will have other features in common, including a PCI-Express 3.0 root complex that gives out two x16 links to drive graphics.

http://www.techpowerup.com/149241/Sandy-Br...ds-Surface.html

Edited by mudg3

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The most affordable LGA2011 chip will be Core i7-3820, with 4 cores, 8 threads, nominal clock speed of 3.60 GHz, Turbo speed of 3.90 GHz, and just 10 MB of L3 cache. Unlike the other two, this one has its BClk multiplier locked. All three models feature quad-channel DDR3 memory controllers, but it is likely that the lower-end models could also have lower DRAM multiplier limits. All three chips will have other features in common, including a PCI-Express 3.0 root complex that gives out two x16 links to drive graphics.

http://www.techpowerup.com/149241/Sandy-Br...ds-Surface.html

 

I expect the highest Bulldozer part to go up against this.

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I'd had (and still hold out some hopes for) BD being able to go up against hex-core SnB - especially as BD seems very likely to have about the same number of transistors and a similar die size compared to SnB-E.

Edited by philo-sofa

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I'd had (and still hold out some hopes for) BD being able to go up against hex-core SnB - especially as BD seems very likely to have about the same number of transistors and a similar die size compared to SnB-E.

dont say that, then ill have no excuse for spending all my cash on a i7 970... :o

Edited by ridir

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Not to be rude, but I can't work out why you did that either man. How come not a SnB with an NF200 controller or something?

Edited by philo-sofa

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I'm hoping Bulldozer is quicker than SB in multi-thread stuff

 

However the "refined" Bulldozer I think will compete with the E-series

 

Maybe?

Edited by nobody813

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Not to be rude, but I can't work out why you did that either man. How come not a SnB with an NF200 controller or something?

cause i wanted 6 cores >.> really thats pretty much it... that and i really really liked my i7 920 i had before this and im use to the x58 mobos... im waiting for my mate who is doing a 3D course at AIE to start bugging me to let him use my pc for his 3D work while im at work and not using it lol

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