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Intel's Sandy Bridge-E Series Thread

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3960x with CNPS12x heatsink in a Level10 GT case

rampage IV

revodrive 3 x2 240G

Vertex 3 MAX IOPS 240G

MARS II

32G RipJaws Z 1600Mhz

TV tuner card

Creative Soundblaster X-Fi Titanium

plus other stuff

Where did you pick the RIVE from? I'm still waiting (with no real ETA) on one from AusPCMarket and cannot find any in stock elsewhere

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3960x with CNPS12x heatsink in a Level10 GT case

rampage IV

revodrive 3 x2 240G

Vertex 3 MAX IOPS 240G

MARS II

32G RipJaws Z 1600Mhz

TV tuner card

Creative Soundblaster X-Fi Titanium

plus other stuff

Where did you pick the RIVE from? I'm still waiting (with no real ETA) on one from AusPCMarket and cannot find any in stock elsewhere

 

 

I ordered it from ITSDirect, they sent it friday and i got it today, computer is all built, just installing stuff, interestingly with the installation i can't have raid setup if i want to use other harddrives by themselves, so all harddrives RAID or none at all, dissapointing. :(

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interestingly with the installation i can't have raid setup if i want to use other harddrives by themselves, so all harddrives RAID or none at all, dissapointing. :(

That seems a bit strange. What sort of chip IO setup is on that board? All SATAs hang off the southbridge? is there some different coloured connectors indicating they're 6Gbps connections? They usually hang off a 3rd party controller and so can only be RAIDed or non raided with the HDDs directly attached to 'em at they're dual port jobbies.

 

Or you saying the X79 chip isn't allowing it?

Edited by mark84

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quoted from the motherboard manual "Due to chipset limitations, when set any of SATA ports to RAID mode, all SATA ports run at RAID mode together"

 

Luckily Windows has no issue in creating RAID.

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I believe it's always been like this. You switch the ICH/PCH between AHCI or RAID modes. You can then create your RAID volumes. I do believe, however, that you can still have single volumes hanging off the PCH when in RAID mode.

 

My R4E has now been shipped and should arrive tomorrow. I may test the above then, if I decide to run my SSDs in RAID 0 before intel release their new RST, bringing TRIM to RAID.

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Yeah thats how its always been. Once you set the controller to raid in the bios you dont have to run all disk's in raid you just select what drives you want to put in the raid array and the rest stay as single drives.

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Yeah thats how its always been. Once you set the controller to raid in the bios you dont have to run all disk's in raid you just select what drives you want to put in the raid array and the rest stay as single drives.

 

exactly.

;)

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Very nice video there mudg3. Was very informative, especially seeing as he went back to show where it's come from

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Good video, but he didn't mention how beneficial a die shrink is past lower power.

 

Ivy being 22nm should be very noticably better in terms of overclocking and performance per clock

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Seems I've missed the party by about 6 months, and now everyone is over at the Ivy-Bridge rave.

 

Anyways, better late than never. I haven't been into new cpus for a while with my last one being an E8400. My new 3930K is quite the upgrade.

 

System

CPU:3730k - Stepping 7, Rev C2.

Motherboard: Asus Sabertooth x79

RAM: G.Skill 16GB 2133MHz Quad kit

Cooling: Corsair H100

Case: Coolermaster Storm Trooper

PSU: Coolermaster 1050W

 

I've hit 4.7GHz, stable with 1.33V.

 

Temps seem ok, but not sure. Does mid 50s on the "CPU Temp" seem ok?

 

My "VCORE" temp (apparently this is the VRM temp on ASUS boards) is sitting high 70's. I'm not sure if this is a problem or not.

 

 

I'm testing 4.8GHz now. BSOD with 1.34V, failed Prime with 1.35V, and now just testing with 1.36V. If this isn't stable, I'll have to play with some other settings, as 30mV+ for 100MHz more doesn't seem right.

 

I'm a pretty far from understanding all the weird and bizarre options in the BIOS, but there seems to other ways to get stability.

 

Let me know your thoughts. Cheers.

 

Also, it seems the C2 revisions are a fair bit of an improvement. Most people need 1.4GHz+ to get similar results on the older CPU's.

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yea if you want a proper 8 core (none of this bulldozer crap) you have to pay a fair bit for them.

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yea if you want a proper 8 core (none of this bulldozer crap) you have to pay a fair bit for them.

True. Though I think my little old quad will suffice for a while to come now haha

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Intel Ivy Bridge-E Slated for Q3-2013

Intel's next high-end desktop (HEDT) platform, codenamed "Ivy Bridge-E," is slated for Q3-2013, according to the latest platform road-map slide sourced by VR-Zone. According to the leaked slide, launch of Ivy Bridge-E Core i7 processors follows that of Core "Haswell" socket LGA1150 processors (Q2-2013). What's more, the upcoming Ivy Bridge-E chips will be compatible with existing socket LGA2011 motherboards, based on Intel X79 Express chipset.

 

Intel's next-generation Ivy Bridge-E chips are up-scaled versions of today's Core "Ivy Bridge" chips, built on the same 22 nm process, with more processing cores, memory channels, cache, and PCI-Express 3.0 certified system interfaces. It remains to be seen if Intel launches a new chipset to go with the new processor, or retains the X79 chipset with a few minor updates in the form of steppings. The company retained its X58 Express chipset over the first two HEDT processor generations (45 nm Core i7 "Bloomfield" and 32 nm Core i7 "Westmere").

 

Posted Image

So by the time Sandy Bridge-E is out, the mainstream platform will have been 2 generations ahead (Ivy Bridge and Haswell)

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