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Intel's Sandy Bridge-E Series Thread

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Ahh KK, I retract my previous amazement ;) In highly multi-threaded workloads you'd be owning a SnB.

which is like 0.05% of desktop PC users :P

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Core i7-3960X About 47% Faster On Average Than Core i7-990X: Intel

 

Slides of a key presentation to Intel's partners was leaked to sections of the media, which reveal Intel's own performance testing of the Core i7-3960X Extreme Edition, the top-model of the socket LGA2011 "Sandy Bridge-E" processor series. Meet the family here. In its comparison, Intel maintained the Core i7-990X Extreme Edition socket LGA1366 processor as this generation's top offering. It was pitted against the Core i7-3960X in a battery of tests that included some enthusiast favourites such as Cinebench 11.5, POV-Ray 3.7, 3DMark 11 physics, Pro-Show Gold 4.5, and some OEM favourites such as SPECint_rate base2006, SPECfp_rate base2006, and SiSoft SANDRA 2011B multimedia and memory bandwidth.

 

From these test results, the Core i7-3960X Extreme Edition is pitched to be about 47.25% faster on average, compared to Core i7-990X Extreme Edition. Intel is attributing the performance boost, apart from the normal IPC increase, to the 33% higher bandwidth thanks to the quad-channel DDR3 IMC, and the new AVX instruction set that accelerates math-heavy tasks such as encoding. The Core i7-3960X Extreme Edition is an upcoming socket LGA2011 six-core processor that is clocked at 3.30 GHz, with Turbo Boost speed of up to 3.90 GHz, with 12 threads enabled by HyperThreading technology, and 15 MB L3 cache. It will release by either late 2011 or early 2012.

 

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TechPowerUp

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^^

 

looks awesome..but i cant afford it :P

 

ill just grab a 980x and rock out for a couple of years!

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That'll replace the 990x at it's price point (I reckon), so it should be the same price

 

Still would last you a long time though, even my Phenom II will for me

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^^

 

looks awesome..but i cant afford it :P

 

ill just grab a 980x and rock out for a couple of years!

 

Im not sure why your 950 cant last you for a couple of years?

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^^

 

looks awesome..but i cant afford it :P

 

ill just grab a 980x and rock out for a couple of years!

 

Im not sure why your 950 cant last you for a couple of years?

 

it could but i wouldnt mind getting at least one upgrade out of this rig before i upgrade.

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I will say this; In most cases, a GPU upgrade is all you need

 

In my experiences, I've been getting longer life spans from CPU's, as I find that they are "useful" for a lot longer. It's getting to the point that if I do another GPU upgrade, my CPU will be the limiting factor

 

A Core i7 950 won't be "slow" for a very long time

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Still, if these slides are correct, Intel has done it again

 

Can "Enhanced" Bulldozer compete?

i want it to, i really want to try out a AMD system and see what all the fuss is about.

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Still, if these slides are correct, Intel has done it again

 

Can "Enhanced" Bulldozer compete?

i want it to, i really want to try out a AMD system and see what all the fuss is about.

 

I think the fuss is pretty much that it isn't Intel :P

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Bulldozer wont be able to compete against this 6 core monster but then I don't think AMD really needs to. If they can just match/outpace and beat the price of the i72600k then it'll become the enthusiast's choice or at the very least become a valid enthusiast choice as opposed to just budget choice.

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I will say this; In most cases, a GPU upgrade is all you need

 

In my experiences, I've been getting longer life spans from CPU's, as I find that they are "useful" for a lot longer. It's getting to the point that if I do another GPU upgrade, my CPU will be the limiting factor

It's just typical then that GPU sockets have longevity but CPU sockets do not. :S

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yeh, i really should have put off my upgrade and kept using my i7 920 until these new processors came out... feel like i wasted my money now :(

 

maybe i can sell my i7 970 to my mate for his graphics work and ill use the cash towards getting one of the new chips :D

 

or i could just use my i7 970 cause its not like its in danger of being too slow to do what i want it to do... but where is the fun in that!

Edited by ridir

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Far out it felt like yesterday when Sandy Bridge came out and now this thing is coming out. Technology continues to grow like steroids.

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If Bulldozer can match a 990X (and that's a big if) then a 10 core enhanced Bulldozer, say with a few improvements to the design could be maybe 33% faster than a 990X (25% more cores and a bit extra for design improvements), which would put it within shouting distance of Intel's latest and greatest...

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I will be getting the 3960x providing it falls below $1500aud on release. Was super close to purchasing the 980x/990x, then a robbery and subsequent item replacement costs left my 'BEAST' fund rather depleted. So by the time this is released I should be back on top of the savings and snag myself what I hope to be a 4year machine :)

 

Looking forward to seeing the combination of the cores/grunt of the 990x with the overclockability headroom of Sandy Bridge.

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found some very interesting rumours about SB-E on VR-Zone:

 

Sandy Bridge E to ship without cooler

How many of you rely on aftermarket coolers for your CPU? We don't know anyone that thinks Intel's stock coolers are great and when details reached us of Intel not shipping coolers with its upcoming Sandy Bridge-E processors we were at first surprised, but considering the target market it makes a lot of sense.

 

The upcoming Core i7 processor from Intel, the 3820, 3930K and the 3960X will all ship without a cooler in the box. That said, Intel has decided to offer own brand coolers for the platform, it's just that they won't come in the box with the CPU. We can't really see why anyone would buy an Intel cooler over a third party cooler as not even Intel's high-end heatpipe cooler for its current and past Extreme Edition models were all that great. Some of the third party cooler makers will have products ready at launch, but worst case scenario, we might be looking at a cooler shortage at launch.

 

On top of this, we're hearing that although the rated TDP is 130W these beasts are consuming closer to 180W and that's without even overclocking them. In fact, according to PSU design guidance we've seen, Intel is telling power supply makers to make sure their Sandy Bridge-E PSUs can cope with a peak current of 23A on the 12V2 rail and based on an 80 percent or better efficiency rating of the PSU.

 

As such it might be a very good idea to invest in a water cooling kit if you're planning on going Sandy Bridge-E, especially if you're planning on pushing the boat out and overclock. The bad news for LN2 crowd is that at least early samples of Sandy Bridge-E is suffering from the dreaded cold bug, although this might have been fixed in later revisions of the processor.

 

On top of all that it looks like the quad core 3820 model has been delayed and will arrive later than the 3930K and 3960X, although we don't know exactly when Intel intends to release it to the market. Intel is currently working on the C1 stepping and this should be what ships in the end unless there are any unforeseen issues with the latest stepping. So in other words, good news all around…

and this little bit about possible pricing:

 

When it comes to pricing, Intel is a very predictable company and although we're not quite sure why the company is sticking to the exact same prices over and over again, it's just how it is. One of our very reliable sources have come through with the pricing for Intel's upcoming Sandy Bridge-E processor and although there were whispers of a price point over US$1,000, well, let's just say that there aren't any big surprises in store.

 

In fact, Intel has stuck with its regular tiered pricing, so in other words, the Core i7-3960X will be priced at US$999, just as pretty much every other Extreme Edition desktop CPU since back in the Pentium 4 days. That said, as you're not getting a CPU cooler thrown in this time around, you're actually paying a bit more than you do for the current Core i7-990X, at least if you use the stock cooler.

 

The Core i7-3930K will end up replacing the Core i7-980 and it'll also end up with the same price, US$583. Finally the Core i7-3820 should be replacing the lower-end Core i7's and as such we're looking at US$294 price point. As such the Core i7-3820 will be cheaper than the Core i7-2600K, the question is how it will perform in comparison to Intel's top of the line LGA-1155 CPU.

 

On a related note, if you look at recent Intel roadmap leaks, you'll notice a little symbol that looks like this ≥ and it's suggesting that Intel is about to replace, or at least add a faster Core i7 K-SKU sometime this quarter which happens to corroborate some whispers we've been hearing. As to why Intel would be doing this is anyone's guess, but it's possible that the new model will have additional multipliers unlocked compared to the Core i7-2600K. We'll just have to wait and see how things develop, but right not it's not looking good for Intel's Core i7-3820, unless it can really outperform the LGA-1155 by some margin.

Source:

 

http://vr-zone.com/articles/intel-s-sandy-...ises/13298.html

 

http://vr-zone.com/articles/exclusive-sand...oler/13296.html

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found some very interesting rumours about SB-E on VR-Zone:

 

Sandy Bridge E to ship without cooler

How many of you rely on aftermarket coolers for your CPU? We don't know anyone that thinks Intel's stock coolers are great and when details reached us of Intel not shipping coolers with its upcoming Sandy Bridge-E processors we were at first surprised, but considering the target market it makes a lot of sense.

 

The upcoming Core i7 processor from Intel, the 3820, 3930K and the 3960X will all ship without a cooler in the box. That said, Intel has decided to offer own brand coolers for the platform, it's just that they won't come in the box with the CPU. We can't really see why anyone would buy an Intel cooler over a third party cooler as not even Intel's high-end heatpipe cooler for its current and past Extreme Edition models were all that great. Some of the third party cooler makers will have products ready at launch, but worst case scenario, we might be looking at a cooler shortage at launch.

 

On top of this, we're hearing that although the rated TDP is 130W these beasts are consuming closer to 180W and that's without even overclocking them. In fact, according to PSU design guidance we've seen, Intel is telling power supply makers to make sure their Sandy Bridge-E PSUs can cope with a peak current of 23A on the 12V2 rail and based on an 80 percent or better efficiency rating of the PSU.

 

As such it might be a very good idea to invest in a water cooling kit if you're planning on going Sandy Bridge-E, especially if you're planning on pushing the boat out and overclock. The bad news for LN2 crowd is that at least early samples of Sandy Bridge-E is suffering from the dreaded cold bug, although this might have been fixed in later revisions of the processor.

 

On top of all that it looks like the quad core 3820 model has been delayed and will arrive later than the 3930K and 3960X, although we don't know exactly when Intel intends to release it to the market. Intel is currently working on the C1 stepping and this should be what ships in the end unless there are any unforeseen issues with the latest stepping. So in other words, good news all around…

Good News All Around!?!

 

180W TDP. That's just plain ridiculous. Only complete morons will buy these... surely.

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and this what everone wants..

 

leaked benchies!

 

the i7 3930K (ES) Vs the i7 980x

 

from Wccf Tech:

 

for the click shy:

 

Intel’s Sandy Bridge-E Benchmarks Unveiled, Core i7 3930K (ES) gets pitted against Core i7 980X

by Hassan Mujtaba

 

First benchmarks of Intel’s Upcoming Sandy Bridge-E Processors have been leaked over at Coolaler Forums. The Sandy Bridge-E chip tested was an Core i7 3930K Engineering Sample which was tested on a LGA2011 X79 Chipset based Motherboard.

 

The Chip was tested in various CPU benchmarks against the current Core i7 980X Processor. The Core i7 3930K CPU was already detailed by us over here, Its a 6 Core CPU featuring 12 Threads, Stock Speed of 3.20Ghz (Turbo – 3.80Ghz) and 12MB L3 Cache. The K Logo represents that the CPU will feature an Unlocked Multiplier which would allow overclocking.

 

The guy who benchmarked the CPU’s disabled the Turbo Mode for both processors for a Clock-to-Clock Speed Comparison. Also we can see a Rated TDP of 130W listed in CPU-z, This may improve with the final revision of the Processor. Also the Corei7 980X was equipped with Tri-Channel Memory due to LGA1366 platform while the X79 chipset allows for Quad Channel Memory Support.

 

Following are the benchmark results:

 

Super PI (32M Calculations):

 

Core i7 3930K: 11m.19.827 Sec

Core i7 980X: 11m.33.852 Sec

 

WPrime 1.55 (32M/1024M):

 

Core i7 3930K: 5.977 Sec (32M) / 168.51 Sec (1024M)

Core i7 980X: 5.772 Sec (32M) / 161.039 Sec (1024M)

 

CineBench R11.5 (Multi-Threaded):

 

Core i7 3930K: 9.00 Points

Core i7 980X: 8.22 Points

 

3D Mark Vantage (CPU Score):

 

Core i7 3930K: 31904 CPU Score

Core i7 980X: 29979 CPU Score

 

AID64 Memory bandwidth test:

 

Core i7 3930K: 15796MB/s Read , 12349MB/s Write , 14204Mb/s Copy , 57.7ns

Core i7 980X: 14406MB/s Read , 12938MB/s Write , 13425MB/s Copy , 58.7ns

 

Not a huge amount of performance leap over the 980X but considering its still an Engineering Sample and had Turbo Boost turned off, The final revision would surely show huge improvements, Plus we can clearly see the improvement in AID64 with the Quad Channel Memory Interface. The Core i7 3930K is expected to launch in Q4 2011 at a price range of 500US$. More info on Sandy Bridge-E and pics of the benchmarks below:

 

(Thanks alot to Coolaler Forums for posting these benchmarks and comparison)

Original Article:

 

http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=e...8%26prmd%3Divns

 

 

Very Interesting to say the least. I know now its early but if this continues into the final product them im getting a 6 core 1366 and rocking on that for a few years! :D

Edited by jdog

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November 15 Launch Date for Sandy Bridge-E

 

Even as AMD struggles to get its FX series processors out, and into to the market, Intel seems to be doing the opposite: trying to get Sandy Bridge-E (enthusiast) out as quickly as possible. The new high-end desktop/workstation platform was slated for December, and then there was news that chipset delays could push it into 2012. Fresh news pin-points the launch date to Week 46 of 2011, more specifically, November 15. On that day, Intel will have processors as well as compatible Desktop Board products (Intel-branded motherboards) out in the markets, ready for purchase. Ideally, motherboard vendors should have their socket LGA2011 products stocked up by then, too.

 

Intel will begin the Sandy Bridge-E platform with Core i7-3960X Extreme Edition 6-core Unlocked processor, Core i7-3930K 6-core Unlocked processor, and Core i7-3820 4-core processor. Intel X79 Express is the De facto desktop chipset. The first compatible Intel Desktop Board products include DX79SI, and DX79TO.

Posted Image

 

At this rate, it'll beat Bulldozer :P

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is an i7 2600k or a i5 2500k that is overclocked to around the 4.5 ghz mark, really that much slower than the 990x or 980's that everyone is talking about? i dont know to much about the 1156 sockets, im intrigued why people still buy them over the 2nd gen cpu's?

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is an i7 2600k or a i5 2500k that is overclocked to around the 4.5 ghz mark, really that much slower than the 990x or 980's that everyone is talking about? i dont know to much about the 1156 sockets, im intrigued why people still buy them over the 2nd gen cpu's?

Just for the added memory channel and PCIe lanes. 25/2600k does very well, and effectively destroys them in bang for buck

 

http://www.guru3d.com/article/core-i5-2500...2600k-review/13

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is an i7 2600k or a i5 2500k that is overclocked to around the 4.5 ghz mark, really that much slower than the 990x or 980's that everyone is talking about? i dont know to much about the 1156 sockets, im intrigued why people still buy them over the 2nd gen cpu's?

depends, if you run a shitload of VM's like some people do on here it may be a bit faster since as far as I can tell this is really a workstation level platform for desktops. Edited by nesquick

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