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Intel's Sandy Bridge-E Series Thread

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Cheers for the preview nobody. TBH, as a gamer tho, I have to say 'meh'. The main thing it reinforces for me is that to be relevant now, Bulldozer has to perform well per thread.

I'm just glad that SB-E... according to Tom's at least. Isn't all it's cracked up to be. Not that much of an improvement really. And the Intel 2600k seems to be still the best bang for buck from the Intel camp.

 

This bodes well for Bulldozer.

 

True. But Sandy Bridge-E was never gonna be a huge improvement over Sand Bridge, in my books

 

I'd have to agree with you nobody, didn't expect much from SnB-E except more lanes and perhaps slightly better overclockability. At the end of the day it all depends on how well a Bulldozer module performs...

 

 

The guns are holstered, the two shooters are glaring at each other across the silicon-strewn battlefield (see what I did thar?) now if someone would just fire a shot! Of course... Intel has let us know how big it's gun is before AMD, so... erm. Ok so not an ideal analogy going forward in many regards, but it's interesting that Intel released a preview before AMD - does it mean Intel is nervous, or does it mean they're confident?

 

FIRE!

 

It's not the size of the gun that counts.

 

Of course, nobody should probably explain why he didn't expect much more from SnB-E. After all. E for Extreme should mean just that... extreme.

 

Sandy Bridge-E is Sandy Bridge + a bit, that's all. As far as I can see, there are no major "improvements". All it is really is getting the Sandy Bridge style chips into the high end market, and finally replacing the old but legendary Nehalem parts. And lookikg at how different they are, it's not by much. Extra memory channels and more PCIe lanes, to dumb it down and make it basic. Only other thing is no GPU, so you can overclock without using the multiplier

 

And that is essentially it, Intel have are merely introducing Sandy to the whole market. If you want major improvements, it'll be Ivy Bridge

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It's not the size of the gun that counts.

She's lying to you man - personal experience talking :/

 

Of course, nobody should probably explain why he didn't expect much more from SnB-E. After all. E for Extreme should mean just that... extreme.

No one expected more of SNB-E for the gamers and standard users because it was always going to be a modification of the 2600K. Two more cores, double the memory bandwidth and double (or quadrouple) the PCIe bandwidth - all of which are only of use to very 'extreme' users.

 

So yeah, not really a bad name at all IMO.

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Sigh.

 

 

 

SB-E is to SB What Westmere is to Nehalem.

 

Not meant to blow it out of the water with new architecture, just refine and finish

Edited by Morgoth

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It's not the size of the gun that counts.

She's lying to you man - personal experience talking :/

 

Yeah... you didn't fool me there, mate.

 

 

Sigh.

 

 

 

SB-E is to SB What Westmere is to Nehalem.

 

Not meant to blow it out of the water with new architecture, just refine and finish

Righto.

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when the time comes i think ill get another UD7....as i liked this one so much :D

for the sake of my and many others personal sanity you are forbidden to upgrade :P

 

Dear god that is possibly the most awesome thing for a company like Intel to come out with glad they went with the Asetek design not the Coolit.

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Hmm ... maybe no PCIe 3.0 this time around folks?

 

"Although Sandy Bridge E is still a couple of months away from launch, Intel's partners were allowed to show systems as long as they didn't divulge clock speeds or allow for anyone to play with the USB ports. Both Gigabyte and MSI had boards on display which you can check out in the gallery below.

Major themes? Cheaper boards have 4 DIMM slots (1 DIMM per channel) while the more expensive boards will have 8 DIMM slots (2 DIMMs per channel). All mentioning of PCI Express Gen 3 seems to have been forbidden (note the last image where PCIe Gen 3 has been marked out on the board). There are currently no PCIe 3.0 devices on the market which makes validation a bit of a problem at this point. "

 

and this is the new X79 boards, not the X58 ... now I am really confused.

 

from Anandtech ... http://www.anandtech.com/show/4793/x79-mot...msi-at-idf-2011

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It's not the size of the gun that counts.

She's lying to you man - personal experience talking :/

 

Yeah... you didn't fool me there, mate.

 

 

Sigh.

 

 

 

SB-E is to SB What Westmere is to Nehalem.

 

Not meant to blow it out of the water with new architecture, just refine and finish

Righto.

 

And here I was thinking the days of petty fanboyism is gone...

 

Neither Bulldozer nor SB-E have been released, but intel has First Gen Sandy out as a pretty good gauge of performance, Bulldozer doesn't, so maybe go back and troll your own thread.

 

p.s - It's easy to play the fanboy card, I whipped up this post in half a second, unlike yours, it has some merit.

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And here I was thinking the days of petty fanboyism is gone...

 

Neither Bulldozer nor SB-E have been released, but intel has First Gen Sandy out as a pretty good gauge of performance, Bulldozer doesn't, so maybe go back and troll your own thread.

 

p.s - It's easy to play the fanboy card, I whipped up this post in half a second, unlike yours, it has some merit.

I honestly don't know why your chucking a sad. I was just saying 'righto' to your explanation. Thank you for enlightening me.

 

No need to go right out and wave the flag upon the hill. But it looks like you've played your card. Who's the fanboi?

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And here I was thinking the days of petty fanboyism is gone...

 

Neither Bulldozer nor SB-E have been released, but intel has First Gen Sandy out as a pretty good gauge of performance, Bulldozer doesn't, so maybe go back and troll your own thread.

 

p.s - It's easy to play the fanboy card, I whipped up this post in half a second, unlike yours, it has some merit.

I honestly don't know why your chucking a sad. I was just saying 'righto' to your explanation. Thank you for enlightening me.

 

No need to go right out and wave the flag upon the hill. But it looks like you've played your card. Who's the fanboi?

 

Nowadays I have many a nice thing to say about you, but you're definitely very pro-AMD - an as such are bound to generate friction. I took your reply to Morgoth the way I'm sure you meant it, but single word replies can be easily misinterpreted.

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How to Overclock Sandy Bridge E

 

 

http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/cpus/2011...andy-bridge-e/1

 

 

"The good news is that in LGA 2011 systems the BCLK frequency will be additionally multiplied by an intermediate reference clock ratio multiplier before getting to the processor, and this multiplier will be at 1.0x, 1.25x or 1.67x."

 

You know what that means :P

 

 

More info

 

http://www.anandtech.com/show/4847/looking...-e-overclocking

 

it looks like the initial i7-lineup will consist of three CPUs: i7-3820, i7-3930K, i7-3960X. We covered most of the SB-E specs in our Additional info on Sandy Bridge-E Processors, X79 and LGA2011 article. The two latter ones, i7-3930K and i7-3960X, will have an unlocked CPU multiplier, which allows easy CPU overclocking by just changing the multiplier. However, the cheapest model, i7-3820, does not have an unlocked CPU multiplier.

 

With LGA 1155 based CPUs, this means you are limited to adjusting the BCLK (base clock). The BCLK is 100MHz by default but unlike in previous microarchitectures, it can only changed by a few MHz until you run into problems. This means you must buy a CPU with unlocked multiplier (i.e. a K CPU) in order to overclock effectively. There was concern that SNB-E would follow a similar path.

 

Fortunately, Sandy Bridge-E isn't as limited as regular Sandy Bridge. On top of BCLK and CPU multipliers, Intel has introduced something called reference clock ratio (RCR). This is a multiplier that affects the CPU and memory frequency, but does not affect things such as SATA and USB buses like the BCLK does. Hence it can be changed more dramatically than the BCLK without causing instability. This isn't an open multiplier though; Intel has limited it to 1.00x, 1.25x and 1.66x.

 

Compared to regular CPU multiplier overclocking, playing around with the RCR is a bit more complicated due to only two possible multipliers. You will need three equations to figure out the three values needed for accurate overclock.

Edited by mudg3

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http://www.fudzilla.com/processors/item/24...ts-at-$294

Sandy Bridge E starts at $294

 

Goes all the way to $999

Sandy Bridge E is going to launch in Q4 2011 and we got some latest price and specs of these three new CPUs. Let’s start from the cheapest one.

 

Core i7 3820 is a quad-core version with eight tread support that works at 3.6GHz and supports turbo overclocking. It comes with 10MB of cache and LGA2011 socket. It will be the cheapest Sandy Bridge E and will sell for $294 but it comes locked and probably won’t be that great for overclocking.

 

The second in line is $583 priced Core i7 3930K, as K stands for overclocking, you can expect an unlocked processor. This K letter and two additional cores will cost you almost 100 percent more from i7 3920. This is a six core with twelve treads processor, clocked at 3.2GHz but with turbo it can go much higher. It has 12MB cache and supports X79 and LGA2011 socket. Price of an unlocked processor in Sandy Bridge E world is quite high.

 

The most expensive is Core i7 3960X and this one will sell for standard $999. This CPU and the rest of the platform comes as a replacement of long overdue Core i7 990X a six core, twelve treads 3.46GHz clocked LGA 1366 processor, that will end up slower than Core i7 3960X clocked at 3.3GHz.

 

Core i7 3960X extreme expensive edition and the other two LGA2011 processors will ship in Q4 2011, but we still don’t have better date than that.

 

http://techreport.com/discussions.x/21720

Report: Sandy Bridge-E to launch on November 14

 

As AMD's Bulldozer processors draw closer to release, so, too, do Intel's upcoming Sandy Bridge-E chips. According to VR-Zone, we'll see the first Sandy Bridge-E processors in stores on November 14. The site claims the chips won't launch alongside Intel's accompanying DX79SI and DX79TO motherboards; instead, users will have to turn to Taiwanese motherboard makers for their early X79 fix.

 

Sandy Bridge-E was supposed to roll out much earlier (back at Computex, we were told to expect it in early September), but mysterious delays have pushed back its release. We heard whispers on the IDF show floor that those delays were related to PCI Express interoperability and especially the lack of devices against which to test compatibility.

 

The upcoming processor for X79 sounds like a powerhouse regardless. The flagship model is reported to have six cores, 15MB of cache, a 3.46GHz base clock speed, a 3.9GHz Turbo speed, and performance 12-15% greater than that of the existing Core i7-990X. Sandy Bridge-E chips will have quad memory channels, with DIMM slots arranged on either side of the LGA2011 socket.

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I was going to say Sceptre core has always been pro AMD and went looking for an old thread to prove it instead I found something I said that is quite laughable http://forums.atomicmpc.com.au/index.php?s...ost&p=49888

I was initiated into Computerdom as an AMD fan. May as well stay a fan. Someone has to.

 

You can still edit that comment nes. Change it to recommend waiting till Haswell, and Bulldozer. :P

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I'm not sure if i'll grab a 22nm SB-E this year or even next year, i'm so happy with the 2600K, but i'm danm happy that my motherboard supports the CPU which gives me the option!

Edited by smakme7757

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I'm not sure if i'll grab a 22nm SB-E this year or even next year, i'm so happy with the 2600K, but i'm danm happy that my motherboard supports the CPU which gives me the option!

SBE is 32nm. IB is 22nm, and then after that will be the IBE parts.... I assume.

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I'm not sure if i'll grab a 22nm SB-E this year or even next year, i'm so happy with the 2600K, but i'm danm happy that my motherboard supports the CPU which gives me the option!

SBE is 32nm. IB is 22nm, and then after that will be the IBE parts.... I assume.

 

Ah I see,

 

I have 22nm support so i suppose i can support both 32 and 22nm.

 

Of course there are exceptions as there always is (More pwoerful CPUs for another chipset or something like that), but i'll have some future CPU support which is my point :)

Edited by smakme7757

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Just spotted some new chips on ARC's website

 

 

CORE i7 3930K/3.20GHz/12MB CACHE/LGA2011/6CORES $652.61

CORE i7 3960X/3.30GHx/15MB CACHE/LGA2011/6CORES $1,131.87

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