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TheFrunj

Adding gigabit networking to existing house

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Huh. That makes sense, it was a box of cable rather than a spool (which makes little sense to me).

 

And yeah, very much relieved - 0ms ping time via ethernet is very nice. Makes the most of the ADSL connection. Will be able to stream HD video nicely too, when I get around to setting that up :)

 

Thanks for the advice all, AD in particular.

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Very nice...

 

If I'm ever up your way and I have my tools, remind me to pass by your place and assess and check.. :P

 

My biggest gripe in 'existing cabling' is with lead in for phone.. Typically, they do 'semi decent' quality from pole to house, and then really REALLY nasty Cat 3 (yes... 3 as in Three) from there to first socket. It's woeful for ADSL signals.. Replacing that short loop of Cat 3 from lead in to socket with Cat5e cable can add megabits to your connection. I've proven it numerous times. Both with Atomicans and non-Atomicans.

 

However, if you have a stable connection, that is 100% the most important thing.

 

AD

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REALLY nasty Cat 3 (yes... 3 as in Three) from there to first socket. It's woeful for ADSL signals.. Replacing that short loop of Cat 3 from lead in to socket with Cat5e cable can add megabits to your connection. I've proven it numerous times. Both with Atomicans and non-Atomicans.

 

However, if you have a stable connection, that is 100% the most important thing.

 

AD

Ah interesting that it can make that much difference. May be worth my while getting CAT 5e from the lightning arrestor on the outside wall to my phone then, about 7 metres through the roof. I thought Telstra had to do this though as it is on their side of the network boundary point.

Also really need to see about a new lead in from the pit to the house as last time I had the joints remade the linesman commented that there was so little free tail left that anyone would be lucky to remake one or two more joints.

He had to strip back about half a metre to get good copper. :-(.

I assume pit to house would have to be approved by Telstra and done by them or a contractor.

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Depends Ali.

 

The 'first socket' is officially where the join is from external cable to internal cable. It doesn't necessarily have to be a socket. Which is why it is now often called the "Network Boundary". A lightning arrestor is not the boundary point. The first point you can consider moving things around is the first official junction AFTER the arrestor.

 

You cannot chop and change the external cable (a real no-no). But what happens after can be changed and moved by a licensed cabler.

 

Pit -> House is specifically Telstras domain. It must be carried out by a work order from Telstra to a Telstra approved contractor.

 

AD

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Depends Ali.

 

The 'first socket' is officially where the join is from external cable to internal cable. It doesn't necessarily have to be a socket. Which is why it is now often called the "Network Boundary". A lightning arrestor is not the boundary point. The first point you can consider moving things around is the first official junction AFTER the arrestor.

 

You cannot chop and change the external cable (a real no-no). But what happens after can be changed and moved by a licensed cabler.

 

Pit -> House is specifically Telstras domain. It must be carried out by a work order from Telstra to a Telstra approved contractor.

 

AD

Ye thought that was the case. NBP in my case is the socket on the wall right next to me, at least one time when I had phone problems the Telstra dude climbed up in to my roof and replaced a very corroded joint between the arrestor and phone socket. Was an old bakelite connector that had probably been there since the phone was put on in the 1940s. :-)

Still would be nice to replace the shitty old phone cable from the arrestor to the wall socket to try and get a bit more than 3.2 Mbit out of my ADSL connection.

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ADSL is stable enough, it resyncs three or four times in an average day (and drops whenever there's thunder/lightning), but otherwise is solid. We're looking to get a back-to-base alarm system installed that'll need a central splitter, so I'll ask them to replace the cable after the network boundary while they're at it (which I imagine they'd do anyway).

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If they do it properly, they put the splitter at the network boundary. Then it stars off from there. If you ask the guy nicely, he'll probably do a cat5e run from the splitter to the ADSL modem and you are set.

 

AD

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