Jump to content
chilli

Why does my VID in coretemp stay the same?

Recommended Posts

Can someone help me understand why when I set core voltage to say 1.32 it shows VID in coretemp of 1.35 under load (1.23-1.31 idle) and why it gives the same readings when I change the voltage in BIOS to say 1.32?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The decrease in idle vcore is due to C1E, Speedstep and EIST (speed and voltage reducing functions), but the lack of load vcore . As to your main question, real life vcore (core voltage) doesn't always correspond to the settings you set in BIOS, hence your set 1.32 may become 1.35. VID can also be used in some programs to show the max permissible official safe voltage. CPU-Z gives an excellent measure of vcore (labelled as 'Core Voltage), and should show you the offset between your BIOS set voltage, and your real life load voltage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The decrease in idle vcore is due to C1E, Speedstep and EIST (speed and voltage reducing functions), but the lack of load vcore . As to your main question, real life vcore (core voltage) doesn't always correspond to the settings you set in BIOS, hence your set 1.32 may become 1.35. VID can also be used in some programs to show the max permissible official safe voltage. CPU-Z gives an excellent measure of vcore (labelled as 'Core Voltage), and should show you the offset between your BIOS set voltage, and your real life load voltage.

Well CPU-Z tells me that its's 1.044 idle /1.056 load when I set it in BIOS to 1.32 (and the same for 1.33), so now I'm even more confused! Not only because of the difference but again because it gives the same voltage readings when I change it in the BIOS.

 

Which readings should I trust? I'd love to trust CPU-Z but surely those numbers can't be right for a stable OC?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd be very inclined to trust CPU-Z but do understand your reluctance. My guess is that CPU-Z is right and what you're seeing is a high 'vdroop' - which is the motherboard dropping voltage under load), you should be able to fix this by enabling 'Load Line Calibration' or 'LLC' under the 'M.I.T' tab of your bios.

 

As for how plausible the result it... what’s your current O/C, what are you using to stress the CPU, and finally are you running the latest CPU-Z?

Edited by philo-sofa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd be very inclined to trust CPU-Z but do understand your reluctance. My guess is that CPU-Z is right and what you're seeing is a high 'vdroop' - which is the motherboard dropping voltage under load), you should be able to fix this by enabling 'Load Line Calibration' or 'LLC' under the 'M.I.T' tab of your bios.

 

As for how plausible the result it... what’s your current O/C, what are you using to stress the CPU, and finally are you running the latest CPU-Z?

Yes I'm using the latest version of CPU-Z, and I've been using the Prime95 blend test. The settings I mentioned above were for 4.3Ghz, which seemed to be as high as I could go on all auto settings.

 

I was trying to see how low I could take the voltage and have it still stable, but can't seem to drop it below 1.33 in the BIOS (which gives the above differing results inc Coretemp/CPU-Z)

 

I found any OC over 4.3 required me to use "Multi-steps Load Line" of 6 or greater (8 for 4.9-5), I assume this is the same thing as LLC? Is it recommended to use this for a 24/7 OC and will it help me to get it stable at lower voltages if I enable it?

 

Thanks for your help with this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

K set Multi-Steps Load-Line to 7 and leave it thar for now. If your CPU is stable, it's stable; 1.35v with no vdroop should be good for around 4.4 to 4.6GHz from what I've read. Not that core voltage is the only setting; if you haven't, get familiar with a 2500K overclocking guide and the various settings, but I'd roughly speaking 1.35v and ~4.5GHz if good. Often BIOS voltage settings are 'sticky' and won't change percisely with every increment you choose, so basically you're good to go.

 

Well CPU-Z tells me that its's 1.044 idle /1.056 load when I set it in BIOS to 1.32 (and the same for 1.33), so now I'm even more confused! Not only because of the difference but again because it gives the same voltage readings when I change it in the BIOS.

 

Which readings should I trust? I'd love to trust CPU-Z but surely those numbers can't be right for a stable OC?

Just re-read this and realised your question is also about idle voltage (which is fair as there are a fair few voltages around!) Your CPU has various power saving features, called EIST, Speedstep, C1E and others I can't remember. Basically they underclock and undevolt your CPU when it's idle, so there's a very good reason for your low idle voltage. If you look in CPU-Z you'll also see your core speed is much lower when idle. Basically there's nothing to worry about here - you only need to worry about load voltage unless we get really complex.

 

To sum this all up, everything seems fine; the load voltage is within normal deviation from set voltage in BIOS, and you're at a decent speed for your voltage. With a bit of optimisation from an O/C guide (or even without possibly) you should find 4.5GHz or so achievable with a few tweaks :)

 

 

The following is just an 'if interested' - (very) long story short , vdroop is there to protect your CPU - when a CPU goes from full power to low power the provided voltage spikes, sometimes getting dangerously high. As a result your motherboard deliberate undervolts the CPU when under load, however good motherboards (and the GA-Z68XP-UD4 is a good one) have fast enough voltage correction to prevent this kind of issue. LLC or as it's been annoyingly renamed by Gigabyte 'Multi-Steps Load-Line' allows you to control how much vdroop goes into your CPU. I found this graph for the UD3 version of your board:

 

Posted Image

 

This is what suggests to me that a setting of 7 will effectively remove vdroop and make it a non-issue.

Edited by philo-sofa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×