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Programming - The beginning

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I've put it off for quite a while now. but ive decided I want to learn how to write applications. Specifically support applications (generally WMI interactions to start out with)

I'm in a support role within a large enterprise (700 000 users - 1800 sites) so i have a pretty good understanding of the Windows/Server interactions, although I feel I cannot really progress further in my career without an in-depth understanding of programming (more of understanding what's going on in the background)

 

I know a little vbs - i can use powershell (no coding of cmdlets, just manipulating others).

With VBS i can modify lengthy scripts to perform the nessecary function, but only after googling around. It never starts out from scratch.

 

What would you reccomend for someone starting out?

Am i being too optimistic thinking about starting out with C++? Or Should I start with perl/python?

 

Can you recommend any Books? Websites? instructional DVDs?

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I would learn VB.net. We are being taught this at Uni before we dive in Java and i'm finding it really interesting.

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If you want to mainly interact with WMI, then try PowerShell. It makes life easy while digging through the OS, and it even supports doing WMI on remote computers "PowerShell Remoting" out of the box.

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I've put it off for quite a while now. but ive decided I want to learn how to write applications. Specifically support applications (generally WMI interactions to start out with)

I'm in a support role within a large enterprise (700 000 users - 1800 sites) so i have a pretty good understanding of the Windows/Server interactions, although I feel I cannot really progress further in my career without an in-depth understanding of programming (more of understanding what's going on in the background)

 

I know a little vbs - i can use powershell (no coding of cmdlets, just manipulating others).

With VBS i can modify lengthy scripts to perform the nessecary function, but only after googling around. It never starts out from scratch.

 

What would you reccomend for someone starting out?

Am i being too optimistic thinking about starting out with C++? Or Should I start with perl/python?

 

Can you recommend any Books? Websites? instructional DVDs?

I would suggest reading up a C++ book or a C# book, read the first few chapters (up to say chapter 4 to get a feel or understanding) and see what you like most.

 

C++ can generally be learned any time. But its a long time to master ( I always learn something new with C++ everyday still ). But if you are new to languages then you should pick up a book, read a bit and get a feel for it, since Visual Studio Express is for free you can download it on your laptop and write some simple applications :).

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It may not be a perfect fit for your work environment, but I usually suggest Python to people who are starting out.

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It may not be a perfect fit for your work environment, but I usually suggest Python to people who are starting out.

We've done some massive dev work in a windows environment with python,

 

I still don't know why someone would willing choose a language locked to a specific vendor.

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It may not be a perfect fit for your work environment, but I usually suggest Python to people who are starting out.

We've done some massive dev work in a windows environment with python,

 

I still don't know why someone would willing choose a language locked to a specific vendor.

 

Development tool (such as IDE and more), third party tools and controls, plugins, online resources and support. It depends on the popularity of the language in the field you're developing for IMO.

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It may not be a perfect fit for your work environment, but I usually suggest Python to people who are starting out.

We've done some massive dev work in a windows environment with python,

 

I still don't know why someone would willing choose a language locked to a specific vendor.

 

Development tool (such as IDE and more), third party tools and controls, plugins, online resources and support. It depends on the popularity of the language in the field you're developing for IMO.

 

Good point, I guess in the end its what the PHB wants.

 

Same reason we have coldfusion here.

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Of course I'm talking about .NET. Although, we have devs here who code in .Net in a Linux environment using Mono. You don't need to use the Microsoft tools to dev in a .NET lanugage but you'd be mad not to. You'd also be be nuts to not use some of the near mandatory third party tools, such as those offered by JetBrains - resharper - dotTrace , dotPeek, etc.

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I've had extensive experrience with Java and C#, some experience with C++ and tangential involvement with python development.

 

Java and C# are essentially the same language, the syntax is almost completely the same. Their primary difference is how they deal with the windows platform. Both have adequate and intuitive IDE's available (Use Eclipse for java), java is platform independent, but poorly optimized for any platform (The JRE has horrible overheads, just look at minecraft).

 

C# is a joy to use within windows because of its more direct access to many microsoft functions and software (Being able to directly interact with Microsoft office applications or DirectX can be surprisingly handy, as one example). The tradeoff is that it will not work on any other platform.

 

C++ is a spiteful language. It hates you, and everything you stand for. To my knowledge, there is no official API like there is with java and C#. Looking up how to do things is a chore, and debugging is even worse. I never found an IDE even vaguely resembling the functionality of either VS20XX or eclipse. Its prime advantage is that a shittonne of old software is written in C++, so you can fix other peoples code, although reengineering old C++ source is not a task I would willingly accept, not for any price. In addition, its got pretty much the best low level optimization possibilities this side of assembly code.

 

Python is easy to pick up, and fast to write in, but limited in capabilities. That's about all I know about it.

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C# is a joy to use within windows because of its more direct access to many microsoft functions and software (Being able to directly interact with Microsoft office applications or DirectX can be surprisingly handy, as one example). The tradeoff is that it will not work on any other platform.

And you say you have extensive experience. not quite true. .NET will and does run on Linux. I know 'cause a bunch of devs at work use Mono to work on our .NET apps, while the rest of us use Visual Studio on windows, for the same app.

 

but originally yeah, Java was platform independent and .NET was langauge independent (c#/j#/f#/vb.net/ironpython/ironruby and more). all on the FCL

Edited by kikz

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