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p0is0n

P-Plater kills young mother

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Hey guys,

 

This happened just down the street from my house the other day, and I could tell it was something bad, due to the number of police and ambulances which showed up, but I didn't know anyone had died until I looked at the news.

 

Here are a few links to the article:

http://www.smh.com.au/wa-news/oh-my-god-wh...1130-1o7ao.html

http://www.perthnow.com.au/news/western-au...u-1226209835714

 

and a brief summary for those who can't click

 

The man who managed to save his three-month-old son's life but not his young wife when an out-of-control car struck them while walking through Maylands on Tuesday night says he wants justice over her death.

Gurdeep Singh managed to push his baby's pram out of the way of the vehicle but his 25-year-old wife, Manju Bala, was thrown several metres from the car's bonnet.

"He was speeding. The recommended speed is 40. I'm a taxi driver so I can imagine what the speed [was]. There was no reaction time," he said.

 

The 18-year-old P-plater who was driving the Subaru which struck Ms Bala is yet to be charged over the incident after speaking to major crash detectives yesterday.

Mr Singh is speaking with investigators this morning.

Police believe the teenager's car crossed onto the wrong side of the road and mounted the curb where the woman was walking north along Peninsula Road about 8pm.

 

A resident who lived metres away from the crash, Craig Melchor, said he believed the car was travelling well in excess of the 40km/h speed limit after hearing the screeching of tyres at the first bend before the accident.

"The way it sounded... if you even drive 60km/h your tyres aren't going to squeal at all, in any car you use," he said.

"He was going way over, he had to. You don't squeal a tyre like that and not be going really quickly and like I said, I could hear the engine and it was pretty revved out."

 

Police spokeswoman Susan Usher said that drugs and alcohol were not believed to be a factor in the crash but police would be investigating if speed or inexperience played a role.

The accident occurred on a sharp bend in the residential road, between Fogerthorpe Crescent and Joseph Street, where the road curves at an almost 90-degree angle.

It is understood that the driver may have only had his licence for a week.

One of the first residents on the scene to help said the driver denied driving at speed at the time of the crash.

Rebecca, who declined to have her last name published, said the driver was badly shaken saying, "I wasn't going fast, I didn't mean to hit them, oh my God what have I done, I didn't mean to hit them".

"He was rocking back and forth and shaking his hands," she said.

 

She had run from her home, having heard the crash after she had put her eight-year-old daughter to bed at 7.45pm.

"I heard a screech that got me out of bed and then a small bang followed by a huge, big crash that sent me running down the driveway," she said.

"I saw the father standing by the pram, up the driveway a bit, saying 'my baby, my baby'. I rushed over to the baby.

"[The baby] was pressed up on his stomach.

"The husband was saying 'my wife, my wife' and I ran around and that's when I saw the car and all the dust or smoke coming out of the bonnet. And I saw her lying on the nature strip, where the rose is now, and I looked at her and she was awkwardly positioned.

"She had scratches on her face. She moved her head slightly and breathed. Then I turned my attention back to the baby."

The woman lay unconscious while many people called triple-0. It was Maylands police who first arrived at the scene, she said.

Ms Bala was rushed to Royal Perth Hospital, but died of her injuries several hours later. A small timber cross adorned with flowers has since been placed at the scene.

"I am totally heartbroken at the moment, totally just flattened. I can't say anything," Mr Singh said. "She was the best lady in the world."

 

Mr Singh will now arrange to have her body flown to India for burial.

Please excuse the poor formatting of above text, was a direct copy paste from SMH.

 

I was driving along this street just a few minutes after this accident happened, and am very familiar with the corner where this happened. The driver must have been doing at least 70km/h to have lost control as there are no hazards or dangers, he just plain fucked up and crashed.

 

The driver had apparently only been on his P plates for a few weeks, and now he killed a mother. No charges have been made though.

 

I was discussing this with my housemate and we were of mixed opinions on what would be a just punishment.

 

Honestly I think this kid needs to see jail for a while, and probably never be allowed to drive again.

Realistically, he will probably get a few months of juvi and have his license again within a year or two.

 

Still quite sad anyway.

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18 year old, speeding, killed someone, put him in gaol where he can't do this sort of thing.

 

Understandable that he didn't mean to do it, but he did it, his careless driving killed someone.

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Think of your licence as a ‘contract’, or an agreement

between you as a driver and the rest of society. The RT A

and the NSW Police administer this contract on behalf of

the people of NSW. When you get your licence, look after

it. Do not abuse it or allow it to be misused. There is a

heavy penalty if you fraudulently alter, use or lend a licence

to another person or allow a licence to be used by another

person.

 

Obligations of licence holders

The State provides the roads for drivers to use if they meet certain conditions.

Drivers mus t:

• Show that they understand the road rules, most of which are written in this

handbook in plain English.

• Show that they understand society’s concerns to reduce the impact of traffic on

the environment and to use the road system efficiently.

• Show the skills necessary to drive safely.

• Obey the laws and drive responsibly.

• Pay a licence fee which goes towards maintaining the system.

The contract can be broken by significant traffic offences which cause

inconvenience, costs or suffering to others. These offences carry penalties such

as fines, licence cancellation, disqualification or suspension or, in extreme cases,

imprisonment.

sometimes the above is just bullshit old people write up to make stuff anoying.

sometimes, young humans learn the hard way.

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The driver had apparently only been on his P plates for a few weeks, and now he killed a mother. No charges have been made though.

 

I was discussing this with my housemate and we were of mixed opinions on what would be a just punishment.

 

Honestly I think this kid needs to see jail for a while, and probably never be allowed to drive again.

Realistically, he will probably get a few months of juvi and have his license again within a year or two.

 

Still quite sad anyway.

Really needs to be investigate. It's possible that this incident will completely taint the driver's life. Killing a young mother. Especially if he's not a complete sociopath, and has kids of his own someday. I'd say if he's speeding by more than a few kph, he'll get done for vehicular manslaughter. Might depend on other factors though. If he's a freshly minted driver, perhaps something on the road scared him, or he was too tired and too inexperienced to know how tired his was.

 

Definitely it's sad situation for the family, but most people don't enjoy killing others, so the young driver needs some consideration too.

 

18 year old, speeding, killed someone, put him in gaol where he can't do this sort of thing.

It's been decades since our justice system incarcerated people to remove them from society. Jail is about rehabilitation, not punishment. - Criminology 101. Edited by kikz

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Thats a fair point kikz, I think if it were me, I wouldn't be back in my car for a very long time... but the father/husband needs justice, and i also think that this incident could be better highlighted to other young drivers, maybe making an example out of the boy (not too harsh, but no slap on the wrist).

 

I will admit to doing 65km/h or more around that corner many times (never again) and I see so many other drivers daily doing at least 60km/h (the road limit is 50km/h, the corner is signposted for 40km/h) so it also possible the kid just thought he could do it at the same speed as others, but it is quite a tight bend.

 

Being a P-Plater myself, and driving fast a lot of the time, this really hit home hard for me anyway. I thought WA had a quite strict licensing system, but I was thinking more and more about this today while stuck in the traffic. I was able to legally drive my car unsupervised with just a few hours of practise with friends. I didn't have a driving teacher and I didn't learn when I was 17 (learned at 22). I was able to pass all of my tests first go without even attempting the practise computer tests, I barely knew the road rules and I was probably bloody dangerous for weeks. The attitude of people these days is that they expect to allowed to drive as soon as they are 17, it seems like no longer a privilege but a right. I was also of that attitude.

 

The result is too many people on the roads who honestly just shouldn't be there. Not everybody can be good at everything, especially driving. Why as a society do we tolerate bad drivers, or poorly maintained vehicles? I would like to see a transition into a system where not everyone is entitled to a drivers license, then we might see some more respect on the roads.

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"She was the best lady in the world."

That's the heart-breaking point of the story right there.

 

yep. poor bugger

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Thats a fair point kikz, I think if it were me, I wouldn't be back in my car for a very long time... but the father/husband needs justice, and i also think that this incident could be better highlighted to other young drivers, maybe making an example out of the boy (not too harsh, but no slap on the wrist).

I'm not saying what the kid did wasn't terribad, but for arguments sake, is the kid serving serious jail time and being banned from driving for life justice? Maybe if you subscribe to Retributive justive. A far more useful form of justice would be where the driver gave something of value back to the family. Perhaps not even monetary... I'm not sure what though, but as a society we need to be careful we don't create more problems by sending young kids to jail. Perhaps extensive community service to educate on the dangers of his activities for all involved.

 

The result is too many people on the roads who honestly just shouldn't be there. Not everybody can be good at everything, especially driving. Why as a society do we tolerate bad drivers, or poorly maintained vehicles? I would like to see a transition into a system where not everyone is entitled to a drivers license, then we might see some more respect on the roads.

Unrelated, but what choice do we have in this country, where everything is so spread out, from our desire for large residential areas (and houses) to the distance from our employment, study, and commerce? Everyone isn't entitled to a drivers license. They have to earn it, by means of learning and proving they're capable :) I'm jaded, so I think the lack of respect on the roads is just a lack of respect. everywhere .... :( Edited by kikz

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There was a lady in Perth about 7-8 years ago that got 3 years for being too tired to drive and drifting into the emergency lane on the freeway, cleaning up a motor cyclist who was walking back down it to pick something he'd dropped. Wasn't speeding. No drugs. Just tired. Just drifted half a lane.

 

The judge made remarks to the effect that it was a "make an example" case about not driving tired, but still.

 

This kid drifted a lane and a half and was probably speeding in a suburban area. With a good chance they were distracted (hard to drift like that without being distracted), I'll take an intuitive leap and say by having his/her mobile out. They'll probably get 5-10.

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I'm not saying what the kid did wasn't terribad, but for arguments sake, is the kid serving serious jail time and being banned from driving for life justice? Maybe if you subscribe to Retributive justive. A far more useful form of justice would be where the driver gave something of value back to the family. Perhaps not even monetary... I'm not sure what though, but as a society we need to be careful we don't create more problems by sending young kids to jail. Perhaps extensive community service to educate on the dangers of his activities for all involved.

Perhaps having him take 6-12 months touring NSW schools, telling people about what he did. Might drive the point home for him, and others.

 

One session a week for 12 months ought to drill the point home.

 

Beyond that, ban from using any motorized vehicle, 4 years, and when he gets to the end of it, mandatory driving courses from a professional teacher and/or driver, rather then someone random dude out to make a quick buck.

 

Unrelated, but what choice do we have in this country, where everything is so spread out, from our desire for large residential areas (and houses) to the distance from our employment, study, and commerce? Everyone isn't entitled to a drivers license. They have to earn it, by means of learning and proving they're capable :) I'm jaded, so I think the lack of respect on the roads is just a lack of respect. everywhere .... :(

The truth is, if I could, I'd take the bus for the rest of my life. Unfortunately, even in Adelaide, which is pretty small, its too big for busses to be practical.

 

Employers are not very tolerant of people without licenses (go see how many jobs on seek have "must have current drivers licence" as a requirement. Sales position at a furniture store, must have valid drivers licence, WTF?).

 

Its once again a social problem generated by commercial interests. Managers want their employees to be able to show up at a moments notice, and if you need a 2 hour warning in order to deal with public transport, you get the cold shoulder.

 

With a better public transport system and a bit of attitude change, we could start making drivers licenses a privilege rather then a right, and eventually a job qualification rater then a life qualification. It would be nice if we could have a society where having a drivers license was like having a forklift license.

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Thats a fair point kikz, I think if it were me, I wouldn't be back in my car for a very long time... but the father/husband needs justice, and i also think that this incident could be better highlighted to other young drivers, maybe making an example out of the boy (not too harsh, but no slap on the wrist).

 

I will admit to doing 65km/h or more around that corner many times (never again) and I see so many other drivers daily doing at least 60km/h (the road limit is 50km/h, the corner is signposted for 40km/h) so it also possible the kid just thought he could do it at the same speed as others, but it is quite a tight bend.

 

Being a P-Plater myself, and driving fast a lot of the time, this really hit home hard for me anyway. I thought WA had a quite strict licensing system, but I was thinking more and more about this today while stuck in the traffic. I was able to legally drive my car unsupervised with just a few hours of practise with friends. I didn't have a driving teacher and I didn't learn when I was 17 (learned at 22). I was able to pass all of my tests first go without even attempting the practise computer tests, I barely knew the road rules and I was probably bloody dangerous for weeks. The attitude of people these days is that they expect to allowed to drive as soon as they are 17, it seems like no longer a privilege but a right. I was also of that attitude.

 

The result is too many people on the roads who honestly just shouldn't be there. Not everybody can be good at everything, especially driving. Why as a society do we tolerate bad drivers, or poorly maintained vehicles? I would like to see a transition into a system where not everyone is entitled to a drivers license, then we might see some more respect on the roads.

I do realise from your posts that this incident has shocked you to the core, and, not to be heartless about it, I'm glad 'cause aren't you the guy who likes to toke on a daily basis ?

 

I agree with kikz that both the family and the young driver have suffered irreparably because of the driver's total disregard of the laws he should have been following.

 

There's an atomican who posted some months ago, about his pregnant sister ( I think it was ) who also was the victim of a similar type of accident. She lost the baby.

 

It's all such a damn needless tragedy.

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Wait a minute, has it been confirmed that speed was a factor?

 

The dude is an inexperienced driver. The ink on his P's has barely dried. There could have been other factors, other than speed, at play here.

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At this point I think the speed thing is still hearsay ... I did wonder if the car might have malfunctioned ... or distraction re mobile / music etc.

 

... from the link he seems to just be horrified by the accident he caused.

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Could have been a distraction on the side of the road. Something may have spooked him, he reacted poorly (as inexperienced drivers tend to do), and was unable to recover.

 

I'm not saying it wasn't or couldn't have been speed, and I'm interested in finding out the details from the investigation, but I'm not going to hang him out to dry just yet.

Edited by Juggalo Scrub

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i'd quite like to know also, and I'm sure p0is(+)n would too. The young driver says in the second link he lost control ...

 

edit: just for you Juggalo ... he was charged with dangerous driving.

Edited by eveln

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I know that stretch of road quite well. But I have not been down there for the last 4 months.

Used to work down the end and to the right. Yeah, that big Police Complex.

Many police cars travel the route often.

 

I will admit it is a fairly tight bend, and those that dont see can be cought out.

 

I will also say that i see a lot of people go through it just under 60, but have not herd anyone squeal the wheels.

 

This is one very unfortunate incident and I truly do hope that the driver has lernt his lesson from this event.

 

8(

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I lived about 50 metres away from that corner when I first got to Perth; if you don't know the road well, it's tight and it's easy to carry too much speed into it.

 

I saw the poor bastard on the news last night. With a three month old infant that he managed to save to care for, and to watch your wife die in front of you in horrific circumstances, it's every husband and father's worst nightmare come true. The poor kiddy will never know her mum either.

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Yes eveln I am that guy, and this has made me think a bit more carefully before getting behind the wheel now, but hopefully we can all learn from this kids mistake though.

 

Wait a minute, has it been confirmed that speed was a factor?

You may be right about speed not being a factor, as I noticed yesterday there were no skid marks anywhere on the road.

I think the police may have determined this and as such he wasn't charged with vehicular manslaughter or similar.

 

Although, for those curious, it was an impreza wrx i believe.

 

Police today charged the 18-year-old Noranda man with dangerous driving occasioning death

I am surprised how many of you used to live/work in the area. I like to walk my dog past that police complex MSGT Bilko, he loves watching the horses for some reason. Are you a copper these days? Been more than a few years since I caught up with any of the Perth atomicans.

Edited by p0is(+)n

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Yes eveln I am that guy, and this has made me think a bit more carefully before getting behind the wheel now ...

Good to know :)

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I am surprised how many of you used to live/work in the area. I like to walk my dog past that police complex MSGT Bilko, he loves watching the horses for some reason. Are you a copper these days? Been more than a few years since I caught up with any of the Perth atomicans.

Me a Copper, no. Used to work on the radio comms dept. Since then moved couple of states East.

 

Yeah moved over to Sydney. Perth was getting a little crowded.

 

I saw the meida reports today of the booking of the driver.

 

8)

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Haven't been down there in a while but I do recall that corner, very easy to go into it too fast.

 

A tragedy,but to be honest as much as I love living in Perth the roads are in general abysmal, and they are forever doing roadworks, the freeway south is currently an accident waiting to happen, in general Perth drivers are hopeless, I seriously have problems even going on the roads these days, and I'm a former driving instructor, defensive driving tutor, various other driving quals - it's just ridiculous, they drive better in Malaysia for Gods sake.

 

Until the system wakes up and learns that driving is NOT a right, it is a skill that needs to be assessed by professionals we will continue to see these awful things happen.

 

Cheers

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Could have been anyone who fucked up. P Plates have nothing to do with it. Still needs the book thrown at him though.

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That's a bit unfair to call "P" platers that ;) As g0t.w00t? says, it could easily have been an old man, or a woman distracted by her kids ... it's just that in this case, it wasn't.

From a few peeps here who have driven the road, it's obviously a corner to be given due attention to, and the kid in question didn't know to, or just didn't think he'd have a problem ... is all.

Just a tragedy that it wasn't just his car mangled.

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