Jump to content
nobody813

Intel's Ivy Bridge Series Thread

Recommended Posts

Ivy Bridge Desktop Core i3 Processor Lineup Detailed, Lack PCIe Gen. 3.0

Details of desktop Core i7 and Core i5 "Ivy Bridge" processors in the LGA1155 package have been detailed at lengths, in the past. Core i3 parts based on the same 22 nm Ivy Bridge silicon, however, were relatively known. Tables listing out updated information about the lineup points out that Intel has as many as five Core i3 "Ivy Bridge" desktop processors in the works, all dual-core, and among which two are low-power parts.

 

The table also suggests that these Core i3 chips will have reduced features, importantly, the lack of PCI-Express 3.0 bus. When connected to these chips, PCI-E 3.0 add-on cards (such as graphics cards) will function in PCI-Express 2.0 mode. Further, these chips will lack support for AES-NI (accelerates encryption), VT-d (enhanced virtualization), and TXT (security). Certain models in the lineup have faster integrated graphics, denoted by a "5" in the end of the model number. These chips also lack Turbo Boost for the x86 cores, but feature HyperThreading.

 

Leading the pack is Core i3-3240, clocked at 3.40 GHz, with integrated graphics clocked at 650 MHz / 1020 MHz Dynamic. This is followed by the Core i3-3225, which is clocked at 3.30 GHz, packing faster Intel HD 4000 graphics. The Core i3-3220 is likely the cheapest of the lot, also clocked at 3.30 GHz, but with slower HD 2500 graphics. These three chips have rated TDP of 55W. Moving on to the low-power models, which have 35W TDP, we have the Core i3-3240T, with 3.00 GHz clock speed, and Core i3-3220T, with 2.80 GHz clock speed.

 

Posted Image

 

Posted Image

What do you think? I also see Core i5's there with 8 threads, and that Sandy Bridge-E is missing PCIe 3.0, and heading is LGA1155 Low Power CPU's... Not sure about this one, but still something to talk about :-P Edited by nobody813

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

lack of pci-e 3 could hurt those who want to run two new high end gpu on ivy

there was talk a while back that they didnt have it in officially yet due to lack of cards to test it with but now that they have that... maybe this info is still a mix of old or maybe it didnt work

or maybe they just want cf\sli users that want the extra bit of performance to spend extra on 2011

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The revision he is selling is Rev 1.3. It states PCIe 3.0 support, and that's only gonna come via Ivy Bridge. That's the best answer I can give you, without official confirmation (which we should see in the next few months from all motherboards manufacturers)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mass Shipments of Ivy Bridge Delayed to June

In what could come as a disappointment to some, Intel has reportedly put off mass-shipments of its third-generation Core processors (codenamed "Ivy Bridge") to June. The company, however, will go ahead with its April launch schedule, and will issue small shipments of these chips. This information comes from sources among notebook manufacturers.

 

This delay, however, doesn't appear to be linked to Intel's ability to ship the new 22 nm chips. Sources say that most notebooks vendors are having a very hard time digesting inventories of current-generation "Sandy Bridge" Core processors, and so the delay is merely to help them ship the last of their notebooks running current-generation chips, and to minimize the impact of the onset of new chips. Notebook vendors are currently seeing lukewarm demand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

can anyone find a solid release date for the Z77 motherboards?

 

keep finding very uninformative crap on google

all i have found is a suggestion that intel is releasing slightly higher clocked sandy chips which to me suggests they are in no hurry to release new cpu\mb

i wouldnt be surprised if we didnt see much till 2nd-3rd quarter from intel or nvidia as much as i want there new gear right now

 

 

damn it thats really disappointing was hoping for a decent new motherboard. 1155 pricers are going down however.

 

decent 3way sli/crossfire are few and far between

 

Z77 is out now, most manufacturers are just waiting for confirmation on when Ivy is coming to launch along side it with strong numbers. We have boards already, and launch is coming soon. Hopefully in the next few weeks for AU.

 

So if I was to buy p0is0n's GB-Z68XP-UD4 because its socket 1155, will it be able to take the new ivy bridge socket 1155 cpu's when they come out?

Yes.

 

As for the graphs, Ivy has full support for PCI-E 3, It's SB-E that doesn't.

 

The controller is on the CPU, so future revisions of SB-E could gain support for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SB-E supports PCIe 3.0 surely, but was not official at time of release, as they had no PCIe 3.0 devices to test it with

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So if I was to buy p0is0n's GB-Z68XP-UD4 because its socket 1155, will it be able to take the new ivy bridge socket 1155 cpu's when they come out?

It's only an issue if you're running dual cards, but bear in mind that board won't be able to take 16 PCIe 3.0 lanes and split them - I'm not 100% on the specifics, but PCIe 3.0 x8, x8 would be out, even with an Ivy Bridge processor.

 

Yes.

 

As for the graphs, Ivy has full support for PCI-E 3, It's SB-E that doesn't.

Are the rumours that i3 and i5 Ivy won't support PCIe 3.0 untrue from what you know? Also I thought Sandy-E was completely PCIe 3.0 compatible in the end?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SB-E supports PCIe 3.0 surely, but was not official at time of release, as they had no PCIe 3.0 devices to test it with

In our testing, yes it does (with the 7970), but it's still not Intel official. We have not tested ti with any other devices other than 7900 cards.

 

Are the rumours that i3 and i5 Ivy won't support PCIe 3.0 untrue from what you know? Also I thought Sandy-E was completely PCIe 3.0 compatible in the end?

From the limited info I have, i3 won't have support for Gen 3. But I don't have a sample yet, so I can't confirm for sure. I haven't signed an NDA yet, so I can talk for now about boards and stuff. Next week that may have changed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

so unco_tomato

any z77 asus rog mb amongst them? maybe a gene to?

or maybe a mb with 3 pci-e 3.0 16x slots perhaps with the last one running at 4x for tri cf\sli?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gene is always 2-3 months after launch. They can't put focus on it until their "money makers" are in the market.

 

ASUS have a board for launch, we aren't sure what yet, but we find out next week (likely have to sign NDA).

 

most "enthusiast" boards have 3x SLI/CF with x8/x8/x4 in PCI-e Gen 3. Don't want to list specific names as to avoid trouble, but they are not rare, there should be 5 or so choices on launch, with more following after.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Core i5-3570K Graphics 67% Faster Than Core i5-2500K, 36% Slower Than GeForce GT 240

An Expreview community member ran benchmarks comparing the performance of the Intel HD 4000 graphics embedded into its upcoming 22 nm "Ivy Bridge" Core i5-3570K, comparing it to the integrated graphics of Core i5-2500K, and discrete graphics NVIDIA GeForce GT 240. These tests are endorsed by the site. The suite of benchmarks included games that aren't quite known to be very taxing on graphics hardware by today's standards, yet are extremely popular; games such as StarCraft II, Left4Dead 2, DiRT 3, Street Fighter IV. Some of the slightly more graphics-intensive benchmarks included Far Cry 2 and 3DMark Vantage. All benchmarks were run at 1280 x 720 resolution.

 

The Intel HD 4000 graphics core beats the HD 3000 hands down, with performance leads as high as 122% in a particular test. The chip produces more than playable frame-rates with Left4Dead 2 and Street Fighter IV, both well above 50 FPS, even DiRT 3 and Far Cry 2 run strictly OK, over 30 FPS. StarCraft II is where it produced under 30 FPS, so the chip might get bogged down in intense battles. A mainstream discrete GeForce or Radeon is a must. On average, the graphics core embedded into the Core i5-3570K was found to be 67.25% faster than the one on the Core i5-2500K.

 

When pitted against a 2+ year old GeForce GT 240, the Core i5-3570K struggles. In StarCraft II, it's 53.64% slower. On average, the GT 240 emerged 56.25% faster. A decent effort by Intel to cash in on the entry-level graphics. We are hearing nice things about the HD video playback and GPU acceleration capabilities of Intel's HD 4000 core, and so there's still something to look out for. Agreed, comparing the i5-3570K to the i5-2500K isn't a 100% scientific comparison since the CPU performance also factors in, but it was done purely to assess how far along Intel has come with its graphics.

 

Posted Image

 

Posted Image

 

Posted Image

Not bad if I say myself, but I know the HD 3000 in my laptop certainly couldn't get that much performance :-P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Intel Might Make Up for Ivy Bridge Delay With Lower Prices

Intel was reportedly planning to limit mass-shipments of its third-generation Core processors (codenamed: "Ivy Bridge") to notebook ODMs, to help in digestion of swelling inventories of current-generation "Sandy Bridge" Core processors. Only a few models (those targeting Ultrabooks and mainstream notebooks) are expected to face delays till June, performance desktop retail processors will most likely not be affected, their launch is on-course for April.

 

To make up for the delay, Intel will might lower prices of its Ivy Bridge chips by as much as $70 a piece. The lower prices would ease transition between the two generations of processors without causing a price-shock to ODMs, when they then have to transfer to the end-users. Intel already attractive pricing for its Sandy Bridge CPUs to help clear inventories. The result of all this would be Ivy Bridge-powered notebooks being not much more expensive than current-generation Sandy Bridge-powered ones, on launch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Intel Z77 Chipset Motherboards to Start Selling in Early-April

Regardless of whether you'll be able to get an "Ivy Bridge" Core processor till the second week of April, motherboards that are compatible with it out of the box, based on Intel's Z77 chipset (successor to Z68), will start selling in early-April. Sources told OCWorkbench that most motherboard vendors have in fact begun shipping orders to their distributors, while some are waiting for the green light. Motherboards based on the Z77 chipset feature LGA1155 CPU socket, are compatible with today's "Sandy Bridge" Core i3, Core i5, and Core i7 processors; and tomorrow's "Ivy Bridge" ones, out of the box. The new chipset offers features such as some native USB 3.0 ports, and support for certain Ivy Bridge-exclusive features, beyond which they're functionally identical to 6-series. Enthusiasts might not find the need to upgrade their motherboards to use Ivy Bridge, if their current motherboards have BIOS updates that let them support the new processors.

 

Posted Image

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have a Z77-GD65 in next issue of Atomic.

 

Pretty boring TBH, not much has changed between the two chipsets.

yea hardware side of things has beena bit slow lately. SB-e isnt all that impressive, not expecting much more out of IB over SB.

 

Z77 chipset well.... doesnt seem to much that Z68 or P67 doesnt offer for that matter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Intel Confirms Ivy Bridge Mobile Processor Delay to ODMs

In mid-February, it was reported that Intel was delaying availability of its upcoming "Ivy Bridge" Core processor family, at least to Notebook ODMs, to June, in a bid to help digestion of inventories of current-generation "Sandy Bridge" Core processors. Intel confirmed this delay. The company expects its next-generation chips to go on sale eight to 10 weeks later than initially planned, according to Sean Maloney, executive vice-president of Intel and chairman of Intel China. Maloney told Financial Times that sales of machines (notebooks, pre-built desktops) have been pushed back from April to June. “I think maybe it’s June now,” he said.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Intel Ivy Bridge Revised Launch-Schedule Revealed

Citing issues with the 22 nm manufacturing process, Intel postponed the release of its 22 nm "Ivy Bridge" Core processor family by as much as 10 weeks. There still seems to exist some confusion surrounding this launch, which SweClockers sought to clear with its latest article containing important dates related to the launch.

 

- 8 April, 2012: This was supposed to be the day "everything" (all CPU models slated for April, compatible motherboards) launched. Instead on this day, motherboard vendors will launch their products based on Intel Z77, Z75, H77, and B75 chipsets. System builders (you) will have to use existing "Sandy Bridge" processors, which are very much compatible with those motherboards. You will not be able to buy "Ivy Bridge" processors from anywhere on this day.

- 29 April, 2012: This is when Intel will launch quad-core Core i5, Core i7 "Ivy Bridge". On this day, the media will be able to post reviews of the new processor platform. It's not clear if you'll be able to buy these chips on this day, either. Perhaps you might.

 

Continued

 

- 3 June, 2012: This is when Intel will launch Q77 and Q75 chipset. The notebook platform based on "Ivy Bridge", dual-core "Ivy Bridge" processors, and the much talked about Ultrabook "Ivy Bridge" form-factor are due for "sometime in June".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So reading this it seems like I should be able to build myself a new ivy bridge setup in late April/May?

 

I've been holding off an upgrade until this is released, and my heart sank when it looked like I'd have to wait until June, but there's now a glimmer of hope that it may happen before then.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×