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nobody813

Intel's Ivy Bridge Series Thread

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wonder if they will release another revision of ivy in a few months that clocks a little better and comes with a lower tdp kinda like they did with q6600 c0 or was it g0? no mater you get the idea

yea that happened with quiet a few CPU's

 

Q6x00 B3>G0

E8x00 C1>E0

i79x0> C0>D0

 

interestingly enough all of which I have owned :S

 

AMD is different. I love my C3 stepping Phenom II :-D

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I dunno nehalem was always a fun chip to overclock, I had a 4200+ back when AMD was actually good in the high end dektop market, it was pretty cool, this is back when overclocking to 2.8ghz for a suicide run was a thrill and you spent like 20mins getting all the settings exactly right after hours of trial and error, now days its just increase the multi *derp*

 

edit: mind you in the timeline of CPU's its hardly prehistoric, I wasn't around when overclocking required physical mods to the mobo and crazy stuff like that.

Edited by nesquick

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Well, Intel made overclocking too safe really. You just up the voltage a notch, and scale the multi as stable it can go. There isn't that 'Oh crap, will it or won't it?' attitude any more when overclocking. I liked that challenge which was probably hard given Intel made the best chip and yet had the crappiest way to overclock. :S

 

EDIT: BTW, got them in stock ATM. Picked up a 3570K already... >>

Edited by sora3

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If everyone hasn't already noticed, reviews are starting to trickle in

 

There are some on Atomic, loads on Anandtech, and one on Tom's Hardware. Haven't looked elsewhere yet

 

I'll say this though, it's an improvement in many areas, but for all those with Sandy Bridge it's not worth it. HD 4000 is good, the cold bug has gone, but it just doesn't seem to want to clock all that well, and is a lot hotter while doing it

 

Seems this new process works extremely wellat normal voltage, with a drop in power consumption, but overclocking this increases the heat even more so than Sandy Bridge

Edited by nobody813

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temps may be higher but its still using less power and creating less heat so aslong as your cooling is good enough to keep it at a safe temp for overclocking it shouldnt be a problem

but after the reviews have confirmed some overclocking fears im not in a hurry to upgrade at this stage

 

heaps of reviews listed here

http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showth...7-3770K-Reviews

Edited by Dasa

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temps may be higher but its still using less power and creating less heat

?

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temps may be higher but its still using less power and creating less heat

?

 

I think DASA might mean that temps, power draw and heat creation are lower at stock speeds and with stock-voltage overclocking but the opposite is true with significant overclocks. They soar at a definite point, with ~1.3v/4.6GHz being a fair bit more power hungry than with Sandy and 4.8 being voraciously inefficient.

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temps may be higher but its still using less power and creating less heat

?

 

the die size is smaller so it has less surface area to dissipate the heat which would be a fair part of why it runs hotter its just not transferring it to the heatsink very well

lower power use means less heat

if you have a large car radiator at 40c and a 120mm pc rad at 80c which will heat a cold room quicker? the larger one with a lower temp will

 

sandy 216mm² die size 995 million transistors

ivy 160mm2 die size 1.4 Billion transistors

ivy crams much more into a smaller space and power use hasnt dropped as much as one would like so yes its hotter

 

as for overclocking im still looking threw reviews but there seems to be a lot of variance between chips with how much v is needed for ~4.8ghz

 

 

 

From the large pool of CPUs that we have tested/binned, Ivy Bridge uses 25% less power on average clock for clock due to the lower voltages required (in this case Sandy's 1.48v to Ivy's 1.27v).

Read more: http://vr-zone.com/articles/ivy-bridge-vs-...l#ixzz1sujQBtAz

 

next to no sandy need more than 1.4v for just 4.8ghz and some ivy need over 1.35v so the above would bea rather exaggerated example i think

Edited by Dasa

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It's only worth the upgrade if you're still sitting on old C2D / C2Q technology. I wouldn't even make the jump from an i5 750.

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temps may be higher but its still using less power and creating less heat

?

 

the die size is smaller so it has less surface area to dissipate the heat which would be a fair part of why it runs hotter its just not transferring it to the heatsink very well

lower power use means less heat

if you have a large car radiator at 40c and a 120mm pc rad at 80c which will heat a cold room quicker? the larger one with a lower temp will

 

 

 

I know and understand the point you are trying to make, but that is a horrible analogy :P

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I know and understand the point you are trying to make, but that is a horrible analogy :P

i never claimed to be good with words :P

but feel free to show us how its done and hopefully make it a bit clearer

Edited by Dasa

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built an ivy yesterday with a asus z77 chipset. defaults the ram to 1333 still. and does random boot cycles. id wait peeps a while for either revisions of mb's bios's to arrive or tried and tested mb/cpu combos before running out and purchasing an ivy cpu. 2700k overclocks better anyway.

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Looking forward to seeing concrete pricing, I've heard reports that the 3570k is around $280 which seems a bit steep? Interesting to see what happens with current SB prices as that will determine what I do with my upgrade next month.

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The product has been launched (hooray Intel), but where the bloody h*ll can we find it to purchase? Intel has screwed up with this paper launch, preview before NDA's, rogue benchmarks, high temps, immature ES samples, the list goes on...

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I've been reading the reviews and most are very positive. For new builders Ivy Bridge will be very nice chips.

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Ivy Bridge Temperatures Could Be Linked To TIM Inside Integrated Heatspreader: Report

PC enthusiasts with Ivy Bridge engineering samples, and reviewers at large have come to the consensus that Ivy Bridge is a slightly warmer chip than it should be. An investigation by Overclockers.com revealed a possible contributing factor to that. Upon carefully removing the integrated heatspreader (IHS) of an Ivy Bridge Core processor (that steel plate on top of the processor which makes contact with the cooler), the investigator found common thermal paste between the CPU die and the IHS, and along the sides of the die.

 

In comparison, Intel used flux-less solder to bind the IHS to the die on previous-generation Sandy Bridge Core processors in the LGA1155 package. Attempting to remove IHS off a chip with flux-less solder won't end well, as it could rip the die off the package. On the other hand, the idea behind use of flux-less solder in CPU packages is to improve heat transfer between the die and the IHS. Using thermal paste to do the job results in slightly inferior heat transfer, but removing IHS is safer. One can be sure that making it safe for IHS removal couldn't have been the issue behind switching back to conventional thermal paste, as everything under the IHS isn't user-serviceable anyway, and off limits for them. Perhaps Intel kept extreme overclockers in mind.

 

Posted Image

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That's what a fella discovered last week, I really want to see what a block like a storm g4 can do with a naked ivy.

 

I've got that block somewhere

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if they all have thermal paste not solder yahoo :) my storm g5 may be put to the test

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itestate has some ivy prices up but they are much lower on staticice than in store dodgy buggers

 

CPU/Processor Intel S1155 i5-3450 Quad Core (3.1GHz/6M/22nm/77w/Integrated Graphics/Box within Cooling Fan) $209

CPU/Processor Intel S1155 i5-3550 Quad Core (3.3GHz/6M/22nm/77w/Integrated Graphics/Box within Cooling Fan) $229

CPU/Processor Intel S1155 i5-3570K Quad Core (3.4GHz/6M/22nm/77w/Integrated Graphics 4000) $255

CPU/Processor Intel S1155 i7-3770 Quad Core (3.4GHz/8M/22nm/77w/Integrated Graphics 4000) $339

CPU/Processor Intel S1155 i7-3770K Quad Core (3.5GHz/8M/22nm/77w/Integrated Graphics 4000) $379

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dam that is a nice ram speed

 

Andre Yang has been playing with the both the ASUS Maximus V Formula and Maximus V Gene, putting them through SuperPi 32M and AquaMark3 respectively. The Maximus V Formula was coupled with a Core i7-3770K running at 6,758.6 MHz using a BCLK of 109 MHz and a multiplier of 62x, as well as a Vcore of 1.920 volts. 2x 2 GB of DDR3 memory was run at 1,308 MHz (DDR3-2,617) using timings of 5-9-7-18 1T for a SuperPi world record time of 4m 48.718s.

http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showth...6-638-points%29

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2x 2 GB of DDR3 memory was run at 1,308 MHz (DDR3-2,617) using timings of 5-9-7-18 1T

 

O_O!

 

2600mhz+ at cas5 is amazingly insane... i wonder how much $$ he spent binning memory kits to achieve that... thats pretty insane!

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