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Intel's Ivy Bridge Series Thread

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Well, my 3570k was shipped out last night, may turn up today, but most likely Monday.

 

Anyone else picked an Ivy up yet?

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Yeah I really want to grab a 3570k, especially if I can get 4.6 on low volts. However I'm not sure if Intel is going to make a big revision to ivy or not, though I think current performance is a deliberate move. Actually I think I may grab one, as my mates want me to build them new systems later this year, and if they get good clockers I'll probably swap with them as they couldn't care less about ocing.

 

Fallen what board are you getting? I'm thinking an Asrock extreme4, or maybe the 6, though the only difference I can see between them is an extra pcie 2 slot.

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Don't forget that the Ex 4 is not a standard ATX size either. It's a bit skinnier than standard so the mounting can end up a bit flimsy.

 

For comparison...

 

Asrock Ex 4 = 30.5x21.8cm

Asrock Ex 6 = 30.5x24.4cm (standard ATX size)

ASUS Sabertooth = 30.5x24.4cm (standard ATX size)

 

Just something to consider.

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Well thats just put me of the Ex 4. Might even wait till someone does a big board comparison test.

 

Hint, hint.

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Just built my brother a computer, with the z77 extreme4, mounted in a HAF922 fine. Very impressed with the set of features its got, might upgrade mine (p8p67 pro) with one.

Oh and got the 2500k, his runs 4.5ghz @ 1.22volts.

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Don't forget that the Ex 4 is not a standard ATX size either. It's a bit skinnier than standard so the mounting can end up a bit flimsy.

 

For comparison...

 

Asrock Ex 4 = 30.5x21.8cm

Asrock Ex 6 = 30.5x24.4cm (standard ATX size)

ASUS Sabertooth = 30.5x24.4cm (standard ATX size)

 

Just something to consider.

That's what I've read in reviews, the z68 extreme3 was like that too, I remember I built one up for a mate and thinking it was small, and the pcb is thin and flexy as well. I don't think it impacts too much, unless you want to mount xfire/sli and a nh-d14. It is definitely something to consider though. Hmm... Now I may go for the Ex 6, I do want something that will be able handle some RAM tweaking as well.

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Fallen what board are you getting? I'm thinking an Asrock extreme4, or maybe the 6, though the only difference I can see between them is an extra pcie 2 slot.

I ended up going with a gigabyte Z77X-UD3H, was either that or the UD5, but decided to save ~$100 and just go the UD3. I'm a bit of a Gigabyte Fan Boy, had them in my last 3 builds.

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Don't forget that the Ex 4 is not a standard ATX size either. It's a bit skinnier than standard so the mounting can end up a bit flimsy.

 

For comparison...

 

Asrock Ex 4 = 30.5x21.8cm

Asrock Ex 6 = 30.5x24.4cm (standard ATX size)

ASUS Sabertooth = 30.5x24.4cm (standard ATX size)

 

Just something to consider.

That's what I've read in reviews, the z68 extreme3 was like that too, I remember I built one up for a mate and thinking it was small, and the pcb is thin and flexy as well. I don't think it impacts too much, unless you want to mount xfire/sli and a nh-d14. It is definitely something to consider though. Hmm... Now I may go for the Ex 6, I do want something that will be able handle some RAM tweaking as well.

 

 

Asrock must've shrunk the Ext4 down to the Ext3 size - wonder why?

the Z68 ext4 is standard ATX sized - I didn't get the Ext3 for that very reason

the Asrock Fatal1ty boards are rather nice.........

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TIM is Behind Ivy Bridge Temperatures After All

It's proven: the thermal interface material (TIM) used by Intel, inside the integrated heatspreader (IHS) of its Core "Ivy Bridge" processors are behind its higher than expected load temperatures. This assertion was first made in late-April by an Overclockers.com report, and was recently put to test by Japanese tech portal PC Watch, in which an investigator carefully removed the IHS of a Core i7-3770K processor, removed the included TIM and binding grease, and replaced them with a pair of aftermarket performance TIMs, such as OCZ Freeze and Coolaboratory Liquid Pro.

 

PC Watch findings show that swapping the TIM, if done right, can shave stock clock (3.5 GHz, Auto voltage) temperatures by as much as 18% (lowest temperatures by the Coolaboratory TIM), and 4.00 GHz @ 1.2V temperatures by as much as 23% (again, lowest temperatures on the Coolaboratory TIM). The change in TIM was also change the overclockability of the chip, which was then able to sustain higher core voltages to facilitate higher core clock speeds. The report concluded that Intel's decision to use thermal paste inside the IHS of its Ivy Bridge chips, instead of fluxless solder, poses a very real impact on temperatures and overclockability.

Click on the link above for pictures and tables

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personally i dont wana risk pulling off an IHS. hopefully intel does a revision.

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personally i dont wana risk pulling off an IHS. hopefully intel does a revision.

removing the ihs itself doesnt worry me as much as installing the cpu without the socket retention and you cant have one without the other

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If I got one, I'd likely use the ihs with a new tim, I'd do direct die if u had a reliable spacer

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I'm hoping a third party manufacturer releases some sort of direct-die heatsink kit. Unlikely, but one can hope.

Oh yes, that would be awesome, but failing that +1 to Intel doing a revision with fluxless solder instead of TIM

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if intel does a revision what the funk do i do with my 3570k?

Keep using it? its no different to any other revision of a cpu if they did one.

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if intel does a revision what the funk do i do with my 3570k?

Keep using it? its no different to any other revision of a cpu if they did one.

 

i just meant if intel said hey we ***ed up, heres a solder version go nuts kids, and they overclock better and run cooler, what would i do with my shitty ivy bridge chip, apart from have a lower oc and run hotter lol

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if intel does a revision what the funk do i do with my 3570k?

Keep using it? its no different to any other revision of a cpu if they did one.

 

i just meant if intel said hey we ***ed up, heres a solder version go nuts kids, and they overclock better and run cooler, what would i do with my shitty ivy bridge chip, apart from have a lower oc and run hotter lol

 

Like I said historically this happens quite alot, not just to Intel chips to.

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haha yeah i guess thats fair plus its a bit much to expect intel to replace old ones anyway, and my 4.5 doesnt run too hot atm..

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