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We can now thank Karma that Steve Jobs is dead and apple can move on

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I've got the Galaxy Nexus too, it's got power, volume up, and volume down.

Exactly, one less button than iPhone.

 

Buttons are a thing of the past.

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I've got the Galaxy Nexus too, it's got power, volume up, and volume down.

Exactly, one less button than iPhone.

 

Buttons are a thing of the past.

 

 

except the android phone i have has a single nav button (i never use) and the 4 "other" buttons are actually simply touch screen backlit icons under the main screen and either side of the mechanical button

like the iphone "group" at the bottom of their screen, but without taking up scroll space

 

and there's a camera button and volume on the side

 

guess you're either an iphone fanbois or not, but my experience left me disappointed, whereas i am having a hoot with the garmin/asus device

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Many of the interaction techniques popular in direct manipulation interfaces, such as how objects and text are selected, opened, and manipulated, were researched at Xerox PARC in the 1970's.

 

However, Bill Teitleman invented the first trainable gesture recognizer even earlier than that - 1964. A very early demonstration of gesture recognition was Tom Ellis' GRAIL system on the RAND tablet (1964, ARPA funded). It was quite common in light-pen-based systems to include some gesture recognition, for example in the AMBIT/G system (1968 -- ARPA funded). A gesture-based text editor using proof-reading symbols was developed at CMU by Michael Coleman in 1969. Bill Buxton at the University of Toronto has been studying gesture-based interactions since 1980. Gesture recognition has been used in commercial CAD systems since the 1970s, and came to universal notice with the Apple Newton in 1992.

 

Source

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True stories are true Virt.

 

Seriously I urge everyone to read the Steve Jobs biography before making uninformed comments and no, it doesn't portray the man as a saint, far from it.

However you feel about apple (not a fan myself) there is no denying the man was a visionary.

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Many of the interaction techniques popular in direct manipulation interfaces, such as how objects and text are selected, opened, and manipulated, were researched at Xerox PARC in the 1970's.

 

However, Bill Teitleman invented the first trainable gesture recognizer even earlier than that - 1964. A very early demonstration of gesture recognition was Tom Ellis' GRAIL system on the RAND tablet (1964, ARPA funded). It was quite common in light-pen-based systems to include some gesture recognition, for example in the AMBIT/G system (1968 -- ARPA funded). A gesture-based text editor using proof-reading symbols was developed at CMU by Michael Coleman in 1969. Bill Buxton at the University of Toronto has been studying gesture-based interactions since 1980. Gesture recognition has been used in commercial CAD systems since the 1970s, and came to universal notice with the Apple Newton in 1992.

 

Source

Absolutely.

 

Scruffy: personally i use windows, mac, linux. I have an iphone because there are three propietary aps i need that are't on android. From the sound of it the android has the same multitasking feature which i find supercedes the need to have fixed buttons.

 

Many of the interaction techniques popular in direct manipulation interfaces, such as how objects and text are selected, opened, and manipulated, were researched at Xerox PARC in the 1970's.

 

However, Bill Teitleman invented the first trainable gesture recognizer even earlier than that - 1964. A very early demonstration of gesture recognition was Tom Ellis' GRAIL system on the RAND tablet (1964, ARPA funded). It was quite common in light-pen-based systems to include some gesture recognition, for example in the AMBIT/G system (1968 -- ARPA funded). A gesture-based text editor using proof-reading symbols was developed at CMU by Michael Coleman in 1969. Bill Buxton at the University of Toronto has been studying gesture-based interactions since 1980. Gesture recognition has been used in commercial CAD systems since the 1970s, and came to universal notice with the Apple Newton in 1992.

 

Source

Absolutely.

 

Scruffy: personally i use windows, mac, linux. I have an iphone because there are three propietary aps i need that are't on android. From the sound of it the android has the same multitasking feature which i find supercedes the need to have fixed buttons.

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I'm seriously considering an iPhone as my next purchase. I want so much to love Android (I have an Android phone and tablet, and I prefer life outside walled gardens).

 

However, the Android app ecosystem is just so far behind iPhone at the moment that I'm missing out on a lot of daily conveniences.

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And FWIW Steve Jobs wasn't involved in the design or production of the Newton. But Apple definitely beat palm to the punch, and coined the term PDA.

There isn't much public display of affection in this thread :(

 

 

Virt, what apps are you after? I've made the opposite move and I have to say I've found the reverse effect. There are many needless apps I am happy to be without and yet I still have access to 70% of what you can find in the Mac market. The Velocity is just so stylish, it has better interactive software and greater viewing in it's larger screen size.

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Virt, what apps are you after? I've made the opposite move and I have to say I've found the reverse effect.

I was going to say ''it's the corporate apps that I find don't seem to make the coding jump to Android''. But then, I just searched the Android market and found Nike+ compatible apps, a Starbucks storefinder, a Polar watch syncing app... the kinds of corporatey things that weren't there last time I looked.

 

So perhaps my experience is out of date and I need to re-assess :-D

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Virt, what apps are you after? I've made the opposite move and I have to say I've found the reverse effect.

I was going to say ''it's the corporate apps that I find don't seem to make the coding jump to Android''. But then, I just searched the Android market and found Nike+ compatible apps, a Starbucks storefinder, a Polar watch syncing app... the kinds of corporatey things that weren't there last time I looked.

 

So perhaps my experience is out of date and I need to re-assess :-D

 

They have recently rebranded and massively refreshed the market (it's now play store)

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However, the Android app ecosystem is just so far behind iPhone at the moment that I'm missing out on a lot of daily conveniences.

Why not create a thread in one of the tech sections? Someone may be able to suggest apps to fill those voids.

 

My biggest gripe with the Android ecosystem is lack of consistency. Sometimes the "menu" button is at the bottom right, sometimes the top right, sometimes you long-tap an item, sometimes you tick it then hit the menu button... Consistent UI elements is one of the things I really liked about iOS, and their criteria for app approval.

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I have to say in the last 6 months most of the apps I was looking for on my Android phone and weren't available now are. Even where I work, Android & iOS versions of apps are being released simultaneously - who would thunk! :P

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Those Genius Bars are a fucking joke and a waste of time, I could source better advice myself from a quick search. Couldn't believe you had to book an appointment to get assistance even when some stores weren't even busy.

 

Just had to get that out there. /endrant

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Cooks is trying to improve the conditions of Apples Chinese sweat shop factory that Jobs created.

The above statement is as far from an informed opinion as could be, I'm thoroughly impressed. And I expect a lot of idiotic nonsense when opening these discussions, so very well done to you.

 

Here's a list of companies that use Foxconn as a manufacturer.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foxconn#Major_customers

 

Now surely you don't believe your statement to be remotely accurate?

 

The difference is most of the companies on the list get a single item from Foxconn, not the entire product. For example, Intel get the CPU socket, big whoop, Apple get an entire phone (or close enough to).

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The difference is most of the companies on the list get a single item from Foxconn, not the entire product. For example, Intel get the CPU socket, big whoop, Apple get an entire phone (or close enough to).

I guess the stickers stating "Made in China" on everything must be talking about a different china.

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The difference is most of the companies on the list get a single item from Foxconn, not the entire product. For example, Intel get the CPU socket, big whoop, Apple get an entire phone (or close enough to).

I guess the stickers stating "Made in China" on everything must be talking about a different china.

 

You jest, yet unkowingly are right.

 

There are in fact two countries called China, the Peoples Republic of China and the confusingly named Republic of China

 

:p

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